Dr Adam Alston

Lecturer in Theatre and Performance Studies

Qualifications: BA, MA, PhD

Email:
Phone: Work: 01483 68 3133
Room no: 03 NC 01

Office hours

  • Mondays: 09:00-10:00
  • Wednesdays: 09.00-11.00

(While I endeavour to be in my office at these times, it's best to email in advance to guarantee a tutorial / meeting). 

Further information

Biography

My research over the past few years has been exploring the aesthetics and politics of audience participation in a range of theatre and non-theatre settings, focusing especially on immersive theatre and performance. I'm particularly interested in what audiences are expected to do, think and feel in immersive theatre; in the production and consumption of immersive experiences; and the latent political values that emerge through the audience's encounter with different forms of immersive theatre. My first monograph, Beyond Immersive Theatre: Aesthetics, Politics and Productive Participation, is published with Palgrave Macmillan. 

I'm currently completing an edited collection for Methuen Drama Engage, co-edited with Martin Welton (QMUL), called Theatre in the Dark: Shadow, Gloom and Blackout in Contemporary Theatre (see also www.theatreinthedark.com). The collection considers the aesthetics and phenomenology of theatre performances that take place in complete darkness, in relation to the uses and roles of darkness in various historical and cultural settings. Theatre in the Dark will be published in the summer of 2017. My research also addresses notions of labour and performance in theatre settings and in the service industry, the uses of secrecy in theatre and service industry marketing, Futurism, dining in the dark, Marx and Marxism, the philosophy of Jacques Rancière, and decadence.

I am currently co-convener of the Theatre and Performance Research Association's Performance, Identity and Community Working Group, and I'm also a Creative Associate with the devised, science-led theatre company Curious Directive

Research Interests

Immersive theatre, audience participation, one-on-one theatre and performance, the experience economy, neoliberalism, affect studies, risk, theatre in the dark, dining in the dark, Italian Futurism, labour and performance, Marx and Marxism, the New Left and counterculture, the uses of secrecy, the philosophy of Jacques Rancière, and decadence.

 

I particularly welcome proposals for PG research in any of the above areas. I am currently principal supervisor on the following projects:

Will Osmond, 'The Nature and Functions of Role-Playing in Immersive and Participatory Theatre'. 

Julia Peetz, 'The Currency of Distrust: Populist Performance in the Twenty-First Century'.

Yaron Shyldkrot, 'How to Keep the Audience in the Dark: Uncertainty in Pitch-Black Theatre'.

Research Collaborations

Research collaborator, Lundahl & Seitl The Time of No Time.
'Theatres of Failure', network member
International Immersive Performance Network

Publications

Highlights

  • Alston A. (2016) Beyond Immersive Theatre: Aesthetics, Politics and Productive Participation. London : Palgrave Macmillan

    Abstract

    Immersive theatre currently enjoys ubiquity, popularity and recognition in theatre journalism and scholarship. However, the politics of immersive theatre aesthetics still lacks a substantial critique. Does immersive theatre model a particular kind of politics, or a particular kind of audience? What’s involved in the production and consumption of immersive theatre aesthetics? Is a productive audience always an empowered audience? And do the terms of an audience’s empowerment stand up to political scrutiny? Beyond Immersive Theatre contextualises these questions by tracing the evolution of neoliberal politics and the experience economy over the past four decades. Through detailed critical analyses of work by Ray Lee, Lundahl & Seitl, Punchdrunk, shunt, Theatre Delicatessen and Half Cut, Adam Alston argues that there is a tacit politics to immersive theatre aesthetics – a tacit politics that is illuminated by neoliberalism, and that is ripe to be challenged by the evolution and diversification of immersive theatre.

  • Alston A. (2013) 'Audience Participation and Neoliberal Value: Risk, Agency and Responsibility in Immersive Theatre'. On Value Edition. Performance Research, 18 (2), pp. 128-138.

    Abstract

    This article identifies a value set shared between the neoliberal ethos and modes of audience participation frequently promoted in immersive theatre: values such as risk-taking, individual freedoms and personal responsibility. The promotion of self-made opportunity, premised either on opportunistic risk-taking, or the savvy attitude that comes with experience and familiarity with immersive theatre participation, will be addressed as valorising another shared value: entrepreneurialism. A participatory mode will be introduced that I call ‘entrepreneurial participation’: a kind of audience participation privileged in much immersive theatre performance identifying the enactment of neoliberal value. While entrepreneurial participation may be deliberately deployed by audiences as a participatory tactic, it will be argued that this particular participatory mode is frequently expected of audiences, or at least privileged as a means of engaging with performance. Work by the British immersive theatre company Punchdrunk will be taken as a means of illustrating this suggestion, particularly The Masque of the Red Death (2007). The article begins with a definition of immersive theatre that focuses on the figuring of participating audiences, paying particular attention to the relativity of participatory freedoms and the centrality of experience production. Hedonistic and narcissistic experiences will pull focus and will be approached as a possible reason behind immersive theatre's susceptibility to absorption within the experience industry and co-optation by innovative marketers. The article then establishes a set of shared values between the neoliberal ethos and audience participation in The Masque of the Red Death. Risk perception research, especially that arising from the Oregon Group and Stephen Lyng, will be touched on as a means of introducing some political considerations arising from the notion of entrepreneurial participation. A more optimistic, but ultimately sobering set of responses will be offered in conclusion.

Journal articles

  • Alston A. (2016) 'Making mistakes in immersive theatre: Spectatorship and errant immersion'. Journal of Contemporary Drama in English, 4 (1), pp. 61-73.

    Abstract

    Immersive theatre makers often go to great lengths to configure and control each aspect and detail of an immersive theatre environment; but what happens when an audience member breaches its borders, while remaining unaware of their transgression? This article explores how the coherence of an immersive theatre aesthetic is not necessarily threatened by acts of ‘errant immersion’, in which the audience strays off an immersive map designed and intended for them. The errantly immersed spectator accepts but accidentally takes too far an invitation to explore, perceiving and folding a range of aesthetic stimuli that are unintended by a designer into their immersive experience of a theatre event. Drawing on studies of immersion, failure and urban dramaturgy in recent theatre and performance discourse, and reflecting on anecdotal experiences of errant immersion in work by dreamthinkspeak and Coney, the article reflects on the creative and constitutive role played by audiences in immersive theatre aesthetics, and assesses the currency of the immersive theatre neologism through an address of its core subject: the audience.

  • Alston A. (2015) 'Performing Labour in Look Left Look Right’s Above and Beyond'. Questions of Aesthetics and Participation Edition. Research in Drama Education: The Journal of Applied Theatre and Performance, 20 (1), pp. 50-61.

    Abstract

    This article looks at the theme of ‘performing labour’ in Look Left Look Right’s Above and Beyond. In this performance, individual audience members participate as a generic staff member in a fully-functioning five star hotel in London. I consider three modes of performing labour in Above and Beyond: audiences role-playing as staff; theatre workers role-playing as staff; and hotel staff performing care and attentiveness. The aesthetics of performing labour is considered as being noticeably theatrical in each of these three modes, prompting evaluation of what it means to ‘reveal’ labour both inside and outside of explicit theatre contexts. The article concludes, perhaps controversially, by focusing on the bourgeois qualities of this revelation: to be attended to, either as audience or guest, as one who pays for the craft of care.

  • Alston A. (2013) 'Audience Participation and Neoliberal Value: Risk, Agency and Responsibility in Immersive Theatre'. On Value Edition. Performance Research, 18 (2), pp. 128-138.

    Abstract

    This article identifies a value set shared between the neoliberal ethos and modes of audience participation frequently promoted in immersive theatre: values such as risk-taking, individual freedoms and personal responsibility. The promotion of self-made opportunity, premised either on opportunistic risk-taking, or the savvy attitude that comes with experience and familiarity with immersive theatre participation, will be addressed as valorising another shared value: entrepreneurialism. A participatory mode will be introduced that I call ‘entrepreneurial participation’: a kind of audience participation privileged in much immersive theatre performance identifying the enactment of neoliberal value. While entrepreneurial participation may be deliberately deployed by audiences as a participatory tactic, it will be argued that this particular participatory mode is frequently expected of audiences, or at least privileged as a means of engaging with performance. Work by the British immersive theatre company Punchdrunk will be taken as a means of illustrating this suggestion, particularly The Masque of the Red Death (2007). The article begins with a definition of immersive theatre that focuses on the figuring of participating audiences, paying particular attention to the relativity of participatory freedoms and the centrality of experience production. Hedonistic and narcissistic experiences will pull focus and will be approached as a possible reason behind immersive theatre's susceptibility to absorption within the experience industry and co-optation by innovative marketers. The article then establishes a set of shared values between the neoliberal ethos and audience participation in The Masque of the Red Death. Risk perception research, especially that arising from the Oregon Group and Stephen Lyng, will be touched on as a means of introducing some political considerations arising from the notion of entrepreneurial participation. A more optimistic, but ultimately sobering set of responses will be offered in conclusion.

  • Alston A. (2012) 'Damocles and the Plucked: Audience Participation and Risk in Half Cut'. Contemporary Theatre Review, 22 (3), pp. 344-354.

    Abstract

    This article looks to identify a political mode of audience engagement in the ‘one-on-one’ performance, Half Cut. In response to recent economic turbulence in the UK and abroad, I draw on Hans-Thies Lehmann’s appeal for an ‘aesthetics of risk’ in the theatre: an aesthetics which I suggest might begin at the level of audience reception. This marks a turn away from the more prevalent application of risk to artistic production. Couched in the sociological context of Ulrich Beck’s ‘risk society’, I compare risk-taking in contemporary financial markets with the apparently trivial and seemingly ‘risky’ act of paying to pluck a single hair from another’s body as a participant in Half Cut. I consider how affective responses such as embarrassment and awkwardness in one-on-one theatre (which might be felt as ‘risks’) function either as something masochistically consumed within the experience industry, or as positive values subversively premised on loss – such as loss of dignity and self-assuredness – provided that risk is not something passively submitted to, but actively committed to. The argument centres on an economically defined power dynamic operating between performer and participant, paying close attention to how the successful operation of this dynamic within the aesthetic space of Half Cut might lift an otherwise fetishised relationship into something felt through affectation. I suggest that a triadic relationship between risk, agency and responsibility – which is perhaps broken in financial markets – is forged through a ‘dialogic intimacy’ between performer and participant, opening space for a radical engagement with risk beginning at the level of an existential queasiness.

  • Alston A, Daker R. (2012) 'Contemporary Theatre “Philanthropy” and the Purchase of Participatory Privilege'. Contemporary Theatre Review, 22 (3), pp. 433-439.

    Abstract

    This brief article looks at the ramifications of private and corporate philanthropy having become institutionalised in the policy of Arts Council England – although couched in the rhetoric of mixed economic funding – and in the fund-raising strategies of theatres themselves (perhaps as a consequence). Philanthropic giving frequently comes with strings attached, strings tied to a much wider system of power. This, in itself, may seem a tired complaint: patronage of various kinds has been a fact of artistic life for centuries. But perhaps this complaint seems a little less tired once we ask how ‘philanthrocapitalism’ might be trickling through into arts funding policy, particularly in the light of the heritage from which this trickling stems. And what of the recent, but dumped plans of the current coalition government to cap philanthropic giving?

  • Alston A. (2012) 'Funding, Product Placement and Drunkenness in Punchdrunk's The Black Diamond'. Studies in Theatre and Performance, 32 (2), pp. 193-208.

    Abstract

    This article responds to Stella Artois Black’s recent hiring of Punchdrunk members for their ‘immersive’ theatre marketing venture The Black Diamond (Scene 1). What happens to immersive theatre when product placement enters its world? And what happens to the product having entered the world of immersive theatre? These questions are addressed in relation to Arts Council England funding policy and Punchdrunk’s award of a significant rise in ACE funding. Balancing ACE’s framework for ‘sustainable’ art against the threat of ‘selling out’ to commercial interests, a critical approach is proposed that addresses how audiences might assume partial responsibility for recognising and responding to the control of art production at the institutional level. With tongue only half in cheek, drunkenness is explored in relation to product placement as a means to this end.

  • Alston A. (2012) 'Reflections on Intimacy and Narcissism in Ontroerend Goed’s Personal Trilogy'. Performing Ethos, 3 (2), pp. 107-119.

    Abstract

    This article looks at the functioning of intimate experience in three one-on-one performances by the Belgian theatre company Ontroerend Goed, grouped together as the Personal Trilogy: The Smile Off Your Face (2003), Internal (2007) and A Game of You (2010). It will be argued that ‘the experience’ is rendered a site of aesthetic engagement in these performances and that this rendering encourages the participant to reflect on the terms of intimate interaction. Some potentially productive discrepancies in these performances will be discussed in addressing the production of experience, such as belief and belief under false pretences, control and being controlled, and a desire for self-fulfilment in relation to its being undermined. These discrepancies will be theorised with reference to Ovid’s myth of Narcissus and Echo and Richard Sennett’s comments on narcissism in The Fall of Public Man, where a provocative model of ‘narcissistic participation’ will be proposed as being relevant to this kind of work. Perhaps the deliberate undermining of intimate experience may open up space to formulate a politics of participation premised not on a balance of power between performer and participant, but, rather, an affective revealing of its elusiveness.

Books

  • Alston A, Welton M. (2017) Theatre in the Dark: Shadow, Gloom and Blackout in Contemporary Theatre. London : Bloomsbury
    [ Status: Submitted ]

    Abstract

    This edited collection of essays explores how theatre works in the dark, examining performances that blur the boundary between stage and auditorium by turning out the lights, and the significance of seeing and listening in darkness to some of this new century’s most exciting and innovative theatre artists. Theatre in the Dark responds to the rising tide of experimentation in dark theatre aesthetics, bringing together, for the first time, leading and emerging practitioners and researchers in a volume dedicated to theatre in the dark. As well as examining the history of how theatre lowered the lights in order to see differently, the book also explores the work of a growing number of theatre makers experimenting with the aesthetic potential of darkness, including Sound&Fury, Lundahl & Seitl, Chris Goode, David Rosenberg and Glen Neath. The book is divided into three parts: (1) Dark Aesthetics, (2) Dark Phenomena, and (3) Shadow, Night and Gloom. Opening up a field of research that considers the aesthetics and phenomenology of dark theatre performances, along with their contexts, Theatre in the Dark proposes and explores areas for discussion and debate that will appeal to researchers, practitioners and audiences alike.

  • Alston A. (2016) Beyond Immersive Theatre: Aesthetics, Politics and Productive Participation. London : Palgrave Macmillan

    Abstract

    Immersive theatre currently enjoys ubiquity, popularity and recognition in theatre journalism and scholarship. However, the politics of immersive theatre aesthetics still lacks a substantial critique. Does immersive theatre model a particular kind of politics, or a particular kind of audience? What’s involved in the production and consumption of immersive theatre aesthetics? Is a productive audience always an empowered audience? And do the terms of an audience’s empowerment stand up to political scrutiny? Beyond Immersive Theatre contextualises these questions by tracing the evolution of neoliberal politics and the experience economy over the past four decades. Through detailed critical analyses of work by Ray Lee, Lundahl & Seitl, Punchdrunk, shunt, Theatre Delicatessen and Half Cut, Adam Alston argues that there is a tacit politics to immersive theatre aesthetics – a tacit politics that is illuminated by neoliberalism, and that is ripe to be challenged by the evolution and diversification of immersive theatre.

Book chapters

  • Alston A, Welton M. (2017) 'Introduction: The dark draws in'. in Alston A, Welton M (eds.) Theatre in the Dark: Shadow, Gloom and Blackout in Contemporary Theatre 1st Edition. London : Bloomsbury Academic Article number Introduction
    [ Status: In preparation ]
  • Alston A. (2017) 'Melting into air: Dining in the dark, reification and the aesthetics of darkness'. in Alston A, Welton M (eds.) Theatre in the Dark: Shadow, Gloom and Blackout in Contemporary Theatre 1st Edition. London : Bloomsbury Academic Article number 2
    [ Status: In preparation ]
  • Alston A, Welton M. (2017) 'Introduction: The dark draws in'. in Alston A, Welton M (eds.) Theatre in the Dark: Shadow, Gloom and Blackout in Contemporary Theatre 1st Edition. London : Bloomsbury Academic Article number Introduction
    [ Status: In preparation ]
  • Alston A. (2017) 'Melting into air: Dining in the dark, reification and the aesthetics of darkness'. in Alston A, Welton M (eds.) Theatre in the Dark: Shadow, Gloom and Blackout in Contemporary Theatre 1st Edition. London : Bloomsbury Academic Article number 2
    [ Status: In preparation ]
  • Alston A. (2017) 'The Promise of Experience: Immersive Theatre in the Experience Economy'. in Frieze J (ed.) Reframing Immersive Theatre: The Politics and Pragmatics of Participatory Performance London : Palgrave Macmillan

    Abstract

    This chapter reflects on the centralisation of immersive experiences in contemporary cultural production, broadly conceived, comparatively analysing a range of examples including Lucien Bourjeily’s 66 Minutes in Damascus (2012), Punchdrunk’s The Crash of the Elysium (2011-12) and …and darkness descended (2011), Hilary Westlake’s Dining with Alice (1999), Florida’s Walt Disney World Resort, and US, UK and Japanese horror house culture. It situates immersive theatre within a (now) pervasive ‘experience economy’ identified by B. Joseph Pine II and James H. Gilmore, and addresses a ‘gap’ between lived experiences and idealised and especially marketable experiences within this economy. Alston suggests that the entry of ethically-engaged immersive theatre into the experience economy, especially, raises a number of concerning issues once participation and immersion are aligned with one of the experience economy’s most important goals: ‘authenticity’. The chapter proposes a critique of authenticity in immersive theatre that focuses on the performance of confinement in a Syrian detention centre in Bourjeily’s 66 Minutes in Damascus, and the director’s claim that the performance offers the chance ‘to experience first-hand’ what it must be like to be detained. In conclusion, Alston explores how the assignation of authenticity to the promise of Experience merges an ethics of encounter with a consumable product for an audience’s delectation, suggesting that the ethical space left for audiences ultimately amounts to sabotage.

  • Alston A. (2016) ''Tell no-one': Secret Cinema and the Paradox of Secrecy'. in Nicholson H, Harpin A (eds.) Performance and Participation: Practices, Audiences, Politics London : Palgrave Macmillan

    Abstract

    This chapter considers the oddness of secrecy’s prominence in contemporary theatre marketing strategies that flaunt secrecy as a trope: for instance, in the recent campaigns of several London-based companies including the Lyric Hammersmith’s Secret Theatre Company, Secret Theatre London, and Secret Cinema. It also considers the incorporation of secrecy in the design of frameworks for audience immersion and participation in fairly recent work by Punchdrunk and Coney that encourage audiences to discover a performance’s hidden depths through physically explorative participation (Punchdrunk), or covert forms of participation that are meant to go unnoticed (Coney). Both of these areas – the economics and aesthetics of secrecy – inform the production and reception of work by Secret Cinema, especially, which pulls focus in this chapter. Secret Cinema makes live immersive theatre performances of films that are unknown in advance of a screening that appends each show. Audiences are encouraged to advertise the performance in advance of going by telling others to ‘tell no one’ about it on social media, and they are prompted to figure out the film’s identity by engaging with clues and procedures for participation that are inscribed in a marketing strategy and embedded within immersive environments. Drawing on sociological and psychological studies of secrecy, Erving Goffman’s concept of ‘keying’, and recent scholarship on audience participation and immersion, the chapter explores notions of audience inclusivity and exclusivity in work by Secret Cinema and how these notions are informed by a framework for audience participation and immersion that ties in with the economic uses of secrecy. I argue that the kind of secrecy at stake is a paradoxically spectacular and commodified secrecy in a contemporary twist on the secret society, complicating the binding of secrecy to polarised notions of inclusivity and exclusivity, inclusion and exclusion.

  • Alston A. (2013) 'Politics in the Dark: Risk Perception, Affect and Emotion in Lundahl and Seitl’s Rotating in a Room of Images'. in Shaughnessy N (ed.) Affective Performance and Cognitive Science: Body, Brain and Being London : Methuen , pp. 217-228.

    Abstract

    This chapter reflects on the close relationships between affect and risk in the aesthetics and politics of immersive theatre. The participatory demands of immersive theatre are such that audiences are more than just receivers of theatre, but producers as well. As producing receivers, participants are required to contribute to the creative trajectory of a theatre event without necessarily knowing how to participate or even what it is that they are meant to be participating in. Immersive theatre requires audiences to invest in uncertainty and this investment is what characterises participation as risky. But risk emerges in another sense as well, for this engagement with uncertainty tends towards the production of affects such as exhilaration, anxiety, embarrassment, or, on rare occasions, fear. Drawing on cognitive psychology and neuroscience, the chapter approaches the relationship between risk and affect in two ways: firstly, by looking at how risk might be experienced as an affective presence; secondly, by asking how committing to a theatre event which might produce a variety of affects is itself a risk for participating audiences. Given risk’s relationship to uncertain futures, the implication of feeling risk as an affective presence collapses that future into a material present, material because of affect’s functioning through and impact on the embodied mind. The implication of committing to the risky production of affect is a political one, for it brings into play the distribution of power dynamics within performance: who affects and who is affected? This chapter, then, will approach the relationship between risk and affect in immersive theatre as one imbued with political resonance, raising the stakes of what it means to engage with immersive theatre as a participating audience.

Teaching

Performing Audiences

Introduction to Theatre and Performance Studies

Theatre Laboratory (contributing tutor)

Design Dialogues

Departmental Duties

Programme Leader, BA Theatre and Performance

Affiliations

Fellow of the Higher Education Academy

Curious Directive, Creative Associate

TaPRA working group coordinator: Performance, Identity & Community

SCUDD, departmental representative

Conference, Symposium and Seminar Papers

KEYNOTE PAPERS
Alston A. 'Errant Immersion: Mistakes and Accidental Transgression in Immersive Theatre'. Keynote paper. Audience, Experience, Desire: Interactivity and Participation in Contemporary Performance and Cultural Industries. University of Exeter, Exeter. 30 January 2016.
Alston A. 'Dining in the Dark: Darkness, Commerce and Disappearance'. Keynote paper. Royal Central School of Speech and Drama, London. 12 January 2016.

CONFERENCE, SYMPOSIUM & SEMINAR PAPERS
Alston A. 'The Aesthetics of Immersive Theatre'. SAND Festival, Kristiansand, Norway, 16 September 2016. 

Alston A. 'The Aesthetics and Commerce of Darkness: Dining in the Dark from Italian Futurism to Global Franchise'. Quorum. Queen Mary, University of London, London, 21 Oct. 2015.
Alston, A. ‘Making Mistakes in Immersive Theatre: Spectatorship and Errant Immersion’. Theatre and Spectatorship, 24th Annual Conference of the German Society for Contemporary Theatre and Drama in English (CDE), Barcelona. 4-7 June 2015.
Alston A. 'The Politics of Paradise: The Living Theatre, the New Left and the New Spirit of Capitalism'. TaPRA. Royal Holloway, University of London, Egham. 4 September 2014.
Alston A. 'Frustrating Participation: Shunt’s The Architects as Postimmersive Theatre'. IFTR. University of Warwick, Coventry. 30 July 2014.
Alston A. ‘Secret Cinema, Secret Escapes and the Paradox of Secrecy’. Dance Research Seminar. University of Surrey, Guildford. 20 Mar. 2014.
Alston A. ‘Performing Labour: Labour and Performance in Look Left Look Right’s Above and Beyond’. Questions of Aesthetics and Participation. Gulbenkian Centre, University of Hull. 18 Sept 2013.
Alston A. ‘Reflections on Intimacy and Narcissism in Ontroerend Goed’s Personal Trilogy’. London Theatre Seminar. Senate House, University of London, London. 13 Dec 2012.
Alston A. ‘Affect and/as Risk in Lundahl and Seitl’s Rotating in a Room of Images’. Affective Science and Performance. University of Kent, Canterbury. 7-8 Sept. 2012.
Alston A. ‘Audience Participation and Neoliberal Value: Risk, Agency and Responsibility in Immersive Theatre’. PSi. University of Leeds, Leeds. 27 June-1 July 2012.
Alston A. ‘Product Placement in Punchdrunk’s The Black Diamond: ACE, Stella and the Privatisation of Theatre Funding’. Subsidy, Patronage and Sponsorship: Theatre and Performance Culture in Uncertain Times. V & A, London. 19-21 July 2012.
Alston A. and R. Daker. ‘Contemporary Theatre “Philanthropy” and the Purchase of Participatory Privilege’. Politics at RHUL. Royal Holloway, University of London. 31 May 2012.
Alston A. ‘Participation and the Production of Affect in Ray Lee’s Cold Storage’. TaPRA. University of Kent, Canterbury. 5 Sept. 2012
Alston A. ‘Audience Participation and the Aesthetics of Risk’. Relate Participate. Aberystwyth Arts Centre, Aberystwyth. 2-4 May 2011.

DIALOGUES ON DARKNESS
Jarvis, Liam, with Adam Alston and Martin Welton (2016) ‘Dialogue on darkness II: theatre in the dark in the 21st century’. Conventions of Proximity in Art, Theatre and Performance. Birkbeck, University of London. 6 May 2016.
Palmer, Scott, with Adam Alston and Martin Welton (2016) ‘Harnessing shadows: Darkness and the theatrical experience’. Dialogue on Darkness I. University of Surrey. 17 February 2016.
Please note – more Dialogues on Darkness forthcoming.

MISCELLANEOUS
Alston A. ‘Audience participation and the politics of compromise’. Forum on the Art of Participation. University of Kent. 7 May 2016.
Alston A. ‘Two provocations on counting the uncounted’. TaPRA – Performance, Identity and Community study day: Willing to be Included? Institutions, Outsiders, Performance. Royal Central School of Speech and Drama, London. 30 April 2016.
Alston, A. ‘Successful Publication’. TaPRA, University of Worcester. 9 Sept. 2015.
Alston A. et al. ‘Early Careers Panel’. SCUDD. Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth. 11 April 2014.
Alston A. ‘Participatory Performance’. Stand-up comedy set. Bright Club. Bar des Arts, Guildford. 13 February 2014.

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