FHMS Studentships and Scholarships

The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences at the University of Surrey offers studentships and scholarships in conjunction with industry to support students through their research.  

Details of current studentships and scholarships are listed below:


Novel controls for gastro-intestinal disease in poultry

Applications are invited for a prestigious four year British Egg Marketing Board Research and Education Trust (BEMB) fully funded PhD studentship commencing in October 2014.  The project will use state of the art phenotypic and mechanistic approaches to study the potential for probiotics to be employed as novel intervention strategies for avian intestinal spirochaetosis (AIS), an important economic disease of commercial poultry, caused by the pathogen Brachyspira pilosicoli. The student will define the functional epitome of this pathogen and understand the mechanism of interaction with probiotic bacteria.

This exceptional research opportunity requires a candidate with an interest in molecular pathogenesis and who has at least a good first degree (2i or above) in a relevant subject such as biology, microbiology, genetics or veterinary medicine. As the project is biased towards molecular biological and cell culture techniques, evidence of a sound understanding of these procedures would be highly desirable. Training in anaerobic microbiology, molecular biology, cellular pathology, metabolomics and metagenomic approaches will be provided. The successful applicant will be registered with the University of Surrey and based in the School of Veterinary Medicine with some of the studies undertaken at the University of Reading.

University of Surrey

University of Reading 

The BEMB Research and Education Trust

Supervisors: Professor Roberto La Ragione (University of Surrey) and Professor Martin Woodward (University of Reading).

Tex free stipend – In line with current Research Council stipends. Plus £1000 training budget and £250 PhD thesis completion bonus.

This studentship is open to British nationals only.

To apply:  Fill in the online form. A research proposal is not needed.  Please attach a CV and covering letter.

Application Deadline: The closing date for applications is the 25th April 2014 with interviews taking place in May 2014 at the University of Surrey, Stag Hill, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7TE


What is the role of the polysaccharide storage compound glycogen in the life cycle of Mycobacterium tuberculosis?

Primary supervisor: Dr Dany JV Beste

Application Deadline: All year round

With the average daily death toll from tuberculosis at 4,500 and one third of the world is estimated to harbour the causative agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis asymptomatically the worldwide burden of this disease is overwhelming. Current drug therapies are being undermined by the worldwide spread of multi, extensively and even completely drug resistant strains making finding new drugs a priority. Glycogen and trehalose metabolism has been highlighted as a potentially fruitful area for anti-TB drug targets. Classically in bacteria these carbohydrates are used for storage of carbon but in M. tuberculosis they are also incorporated into important cell wall lipids critical to the virulence of this pathogen. Over accumulation of an alternative storage carbohydrate triacylglyceride has been associated with slow growth and drug tolerance but the impact of glycogen storage on the metabolism, physiology and antibiotic tolerance of M. tuberculosis has yet to be investigated. This PhD project aims to generate M. tuberculosis mutants which over and under produce glycogen and then use the tools of systems biology to explore the metabolic and physiological phenotype of these mutants in-vitro and also ex-vivo in human host cells. The findings will not only advance our knowledge about the metabolic strategy used by M. tuberculosis but could also aid in the development of novel anti-tuberculosis drugs.  

The project is suitable for a candidate with a background in microbiology and related disciplines and an interest in microbial metabolism. You also need to meet the entry requirements of the University if Surrey where this PhD will be based. Please address any enquiries to d.beste@surrey.ac.uk.

Funding Information
This is available to self-funded students and the candidate is required to cover cost of living and registration with the University of Surrey www.surrey.ac.uk in addition to bench fees of £10,000 per year.

RAE 2008

Unit of Assessment : Allied Health Professions and studies
FTE Category A submitted4*3*2*1*Unclassified
61.65 %20%40%35%5%0%

Subject areas

Biological and Medical Sciences
- Biochemistry
- Microbiology
- Molecular biology
- Systems biology

 


The emerging role of cardiac fibroblasts in heart physiology and pathology

Primary supervisor: Dr Patrizia Camelliti 

The heart is made up of many different cell types – myocytes which enable contraction, vascular cells which construct the blood supply network and fibroblasts which are traditionally thought to provide structural support.  In recent years, however, it has become clear that fibroblasts are not just a passive structural scaffold, but play an active role in heart function, particularly in disease where they become activated and their number increase to >70% of all heart cells. This PhD project will investigate the so far under explored mechanisms through which fibroblasts communicate with the myocytes and affect cardiac function in the normal heart and in response to cardiac diseases. The novel and exciting approach has the potential to identify new therapeutic targets which manipulate fibroblast contribution to heart function in disease.

You will be trained in cardiac electrophysiology, tissue engineering, molecular biology and advanced imaging methods. The main methodologies used in this project will be cell culture, western blotting, quantitative real-time PCR, ELISA, immunofluorescence, confocal microscopy, and multicellular electrophysiology methods including multi-electrode arrays and optical mapping.

You will be part of the Cardiovascular Research Group at the University of Surrey and will be involved in close collaborations with a number of other internationally recognised research groups at the University of Oxford, University College London and Washington University in St Louis. You will be encouraged to spend research visits in the above Institutions and present work at various national and international meetings.

For further information please contact Dr Patrizia Camelliti (p.camelliti@surrey.ac.uk)

Interested candidates should apply through the university website. Applicants should have a MSc degree or an upper second class degree.

Funding Information
This is available to self-funded students

References:

Kohl P & Camelliti P. Fibroblast-myocyte connections in the heart. Heart Rhythm. 2012; 9:461-4.
Vasquez C, Mohandas P, Louie KL, Benamer N, Bapat AC, Morley GE. Enhanced fibroblast-myocyte interactions in response to cardiac injury. Circulation Research. 2010; 107(8):1011-20.
Camelliti P, Gallagher JO, Kohl P & McCulloch A. Micropatterned cell cultures on elastic membranes as an in vitro model of myocardium. Nature Protocols. 2006; 1:1379-1391.
Camelliti P, Borg TK, Kohl P. Structural and functional characterisation of cardiac fibroblasts. Cardiovasc Res. 2005; 65(1):40-51.

How to Apply

If you are interested in applying for a PhD or MD, please see the 'Programmes and How to Apply' section of the Graduate School Homepage or access our online application form.

Useful Links

Postgraduate Life at Surrey

To find out more about life as a postgraduate at Surrey, as a prospective or current student, visit the postgraduate pages.

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