Academic Profiles

Research Interests

My areas of interest are in nutrition throughout the lifecycle and in population subgroups, pregnancy, children, retirement, and nutrition in aging. impact of nutrition on health or behaviour outcomes in the UK population and specific population groups including shift-workers, older people and school aged children.

Interest in shift work and diurnal variation stems from my PhD research (250K funded HSE). I am currently interested in diurnal patterns and measurement of glycaemic control, involved in a BBSRC funded project (900K) to investigate the role of feeding in the human circadian phase response in peripheral tissues.

Type 2 diabetes: impact of diet, nutrition education and glucose monitoring on glycaemic control in healthy and diabetic subjects. I am interested in glycaemic control during pregnancy and menopause with plan to investigate glycaemic control during pregnancy and gestational diabetes.

I also have research interests in obesity and healthy eating, particularly through consumer choice and eating habits, I was involved in the EU funded DIOGENES project investigating Diet obesity and genes. I have recently developed a tool for assessing healthy diet intake in children, this will present a valid tool for rapid and consistent assessment of the healthiness of dietary intake by providing a healthy diet index score (Internally Funded 4K).

I also have an interest in Vitamins D and K through collaborative work with our bone health team. I am currently involved with Local research groups in Healthy diet training for Learning disabilities and carers (charity funded) and The impact of Yakult supplementation on IBS (industry funded (5K).

Nutrition of older people: food provision and nutrition input in clinical and non-clinical settings, Adequacy and outcomes.

Research Collaborations

Dr Kathryn Hart

Dr Shelagh Hampton

Prof Monique Raats

Prof Susan Lanham New

Prof Debra Skene

Dr Jonathon Johnston

 Dr John Nichols

Teaching

Lecturer in Public Health Nutrition

Teaching responsibilities at all levels of the programme using a variety of delivery methods, including traditional lectures, active learning, EBL and e-learning.

Module organiser for:

MSc Nutritional Medicine BMSM002 Public Health Nutrition and Epidemiology
MSc Human Nutrition HNM004 International and Public Health Nutrition
BMS3058 International and Public Health Nutrition

Teaching areas:

HE7:
Macronutrients
Methods for recording dietary intake
Vitamin D supplementation debate

HE6:
Early life nutrition and later disease
Local national and global public health nutrition
Determinants of Health in the UK
PHN programme planning and evaluation
UK Food security and sustainability
International nutrition- global food supply
Nutrition issues for international nutrition
Double Burden of disease.

HE5:
Factors affecting food choice and introduction to food labelling
Foetal Nutrition

Departmental Duties

Programme Director MSc Nutritional Medicine

Validation and Accreditation of MSC Nutritional Medicine programme.

Affiliations

Health Professions Council

British Dietetic Association

Nutrition Society

Higher Education Academy

Contact Me

E-mail:
Phone: 01483 68 2532

Find me on campus
Room: 23 AY 03

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My office hours

By Appointment

Publications

Journal articles

  • Gibbs M, Harrington D, Starkey S, Hampton S, Williams P. (2014) 'Diurnal postprandial responses to low and high glycaemic index mixed meals'. Clinical Nutrition, 33 (5), pp. 889-894.
  • Darling AL, Hart KH, Gibbs MA, Lanham-New SA, Gossiel F, Eastell R, Kantermann T, Horton K, Johnsen S, Berry JL, Skene DJ, Vieth R. (2014) 'Greater seasonal cycling of 25-hydroxyvitamin D is associated with increased parathyroid hormone and bone resorption'. Osteoporosis International, 25 (3), pp. 933-941.
  • Koidis F, Brunger L, Gibbs M, Hampton S. (2014) 'The effect of eating rate on satiety in healthy and overweight people - A pilot study'. e-SPEN Journal,
  • Koidis F, Brunger L, Gibbs M, Hampton S. (2014) 'The effect of eating rate on satiety in healthy and overweight people - A pilot study'. e-SPEN Journal, 9 (2)
  • Gibbs M, Harrington D, Starkey S, Williams P, Hampton S. (2013) 'Diurnal postprandial responses to low and high glycaemic index mixed meals.'. Clin Nutr,
  • Darling AL, Hart KH, Gibbs MA, Lanham-New SA, Gossiel F, Eastell R, Kantermann T, Horton K, Johnsen S, Berry JL, Skene DJ, Vieth R. (2013) 'Greater seasonal cycling of 25-hydroxyvitamin D is associated with increased parathyroid hormone and bone resorption'. Osteoporosis International, , pp. 1-9.

    Abstract

    Summary: This analysis assessed whether seasonal change in 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration was associated with bone resorption, as evidenced by serum parathyroid hormone and C-terminal telopeptide concentrations. The main finding was that increased seasonal fluctuation in 25-hydroxyvitamin D was associated with increased levels of parathyroid hormone and C-terminal telopeptide. Introduction: It is established that adequate 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D, vitamin D) concentration is required for healthy bone mineralisation. It is unknown whether seasonal fluctuations in 25(OH)D also impact on bone health. If large seasonal fluctuations in 25(OH)D were associated with increased bone resorption, this would suggest a detriment to bone health. Therefore, this analysis assessed whether there is an association between seasonal variation in 25(OH)D and bone resorption. Methods: The participants were (n = 279) Caucasian and (n = 88) South Asian women (mean (±SD); age 48.2 years (14.4)) who participated in the longitudinal Diet, Food Intake, Nutrition and Exposure to the Sun in Southern England study (2006-2007). The main outcomes were serum 25(OH)D, serum parathyroid hormone (sPTH) and serum C-terminal telopeptide of collagen (sCTX), sampled once per season for each participant. Results: Non-linear mixed modelling showed the (amplitude/mesor) ratio for seasonal change in log 25(OH)D to be predictive of log sPTH (estimate = 0.057, 95 % CI (0.051, 0.063), p < 0.0001). Therefore, individuals with a higher seasonal change in log 25(OH)D, adjusted for overall log 25(OH)D concentration, showed increased levels of log sPTH. There was a corresponding significant ability to predict the range of seasonal change in log 25(OH)D through the level of sCTX. Here, the corresponding parameter statistics were estimate = 0.528, 95 % CI (0.418, 0.638) and p ≤ 0.0001. Conclusions: These findings suggest a possible detriment to bone health via increased levels of sPTH and sCTX in individuals with a larger seasonal change in 25(OH)D concentration. Further larger cohort studies are required to further investigate these preliminary findings. © 2013 International Osteoporosis Foundation and National Osteoporosis Foundation.

  • Darling AL, Hakim OA, Horton K, Gibbs MA, Cui L, Berry JL, Lanham-New SA, Hart KH. (2013) 'Adaptations in tibial cortical thickness and total volumetric bone density in postmenopausal South Asian women with small bone size.'. Bone, 55 (1), pp. 36-43.

    Abstract

    There is some evidence that South Asian women may have an increased risk of osteoporosis compared with Caucasian women, although whether South Asians are at increased risk of fracture is not clear. It is unknown whether older South Asian women differ from Caucasian women in bone geometry. This is the first study, to the authors' knowledge, to use peripheral Quantitative Computed Tomography (pQCT) to measure radial and tibial bone geometry in postmenopausal South Asian women. In comparison to Caucasian women, Asian women had smaller bone size at the 4% (-18% p<0.001) and 66% radius (-15% p=0.04) as well as increased total density at the 4% (+13% p=0.01) radius. For the tibia, they had a smaller bone size at the 4% (-16% p=0.005) and 14% (-38% p=0.002) sites. Also, Asians had increased cortical thickness (-17% p=0.04) at the 38% tibia, (in proportion to bone size (-30% p=0.003)). Furthermore, at the 4% and 14% tibia there were increased total densities (+12% to +29% p<0.01) and at the 14% tibia there was increased cortical density (+5% p=0.005) in Asians. These differences at the 14% and 38% (but not 4%) remained statistically significant after adjustment for Body Mass Index (BMI). These adaptations are similar to those seen previously in Chinese women. Asian women had reduced strength at the radius and tibia, evidenced by the 20-40% reduction in both polar Strength Strain Index (SSIp) and fracture load (under bending). Overall, the smaller bone size in South Asians is likely to be detrimental to bone strength, despite some adaptations in tibial cortical thickness and tibial and radial density which may partially compensate for this.

  • Koidis F, Brunger L, Gibbs M, Hampton S. (2013) 'The effect of eating rate on satiety in healthy and overweight people- a pilot study'. CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS PROCEEDINGS OF THE NUTRITION SOCIETY, 72 (OCE4), pp. E218-E218.
  • Khojah SO, Khan JA, Balamesh KS, Berry JL, Gibbs M, Lanham-New SA, Dehlawi FMA. (2013) 'Extensive hypovitaminosis d in partly veiled Saudi Arabian premenopausal and postmenopausal women: Influence on bone health'. Life Science Journal, 10 (4), pp. 3496-3503.
  • Khojah SO, Khan JA, Balamesh KS, Berry JL, Gibbs M, Lanham-New SA, Dehlawi FMA. (2013) 'Extensive hypovitaminosis D in partly veiled Saudi Arabian premenopausal and postmenopausal women: Influence on bone health'. Life Science Journal, 10 (4), pp. 3159-3166.
  • Hodgkins C, Barnett J, Wasowicz-Kirylo G, Stysko-Kunkowska M, Gulcan Y, Kustepeli Y, Akgungor S, Chryssochoidis G, Fernández-Celemin L, Storcksdieck Genannt Bonsmann S, Gibbs M, Raats MM. (2012) 'Understanding how consumers categorise nutritional labels: A consumer derived typology for front-of-pack nutrition labelling.'. Elsevier Appetite, 59 (3), pp. 806-817.

    Abstract

    Significant ongoing debate exists amongst stakeholders as to the best front-of-pack labelling approach and emerging evidence suggests that the plethora of schemes may cause confusion for the consumer. To gain a better understanding of the relevant psychological phenomena and consumer perspectives surrounding FoP labelling schemes and their optimal development a Multiple Sort Procedure study involving free sorting of a range of nutritional labels presented on cards was performed in four countries (n=60). The underlying structure of the qualitative data generated was explored using Multiple Scalogram Analysis. Elicitation of categorisations from consumers has the potential to provide a very important perspective in this arena and results demonstrated that the amount of information contained within a nutrition label has high salience for consumers, as does the health utility of the label although a dichotomy exists in the affective evaluation of the labels containing varying degrees of information aggregation. Classification of exiting front-of-pack labelling systems on a proposed dimension of 'directiveness' leads to a better understanding of why some schemes may be more effective than others in particular situations or for particular consumers. Based on this research an enhanced hypothetical front-of-pack labelling scheme which combines both directive and non-directive elements is proposed.

  • Gibbs M, Hampton S, Morgan L, Arendt J. (2007) 'Predicting circadian response to abrupt phase shift: 6-sulphatoxymelatonin rhythms in rotating shift workers offshore'. SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL RHYTHMS, 22 (4), pp. 368-370.
  • Gibbs M, Jetha A, Mellor D, Hampton S. (2006) 'Diurnal variation in glycaemic index: comparison of a low- and high-glycaemic index mixed meal.'. CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS PROCEEDINGS OF THE NUTRITION SOCIETY, 65, pp. 82A-82A.
  • Gibbs M, Tzung C, Gatwood E, Hurley J, Morgan L. (2005) 'Dietary intake and determinants of food choice in post office shift-workers'. CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS PROCEEDINGS OF THE NUTRITION SOCIETY, 64, pp. 64A-64A.
  • Morgan L, Hampton S, Gibbs M, Arendt J. (2003) 'Circadian aspects of postprandial metabolism'. MARCEL DEKKER INC CHRONOBIOLOGY INTERNATIONAL, 20 (5), pp. 795-808.
  • Gibbs M, Hampton S, Morgan L, Arendt J. (2002) 'Adaptation of the circadian rhythm of 6-sulphatoxymelatonin to a shift schedule of seven nights followed by seven days in offshore oil installation workers'. ELSEVIER SCI IRELAND LTD NEUROSCIENCE LETTERS, 325 (2) Article number PII S0304-3940(02)00247-1 , pp. 91-94.

Conference papers

  • Wadsworth J, Darling A, Shearer M, Gibbs M, Adamson J, Torgerson D, Lanham-New S. (2011) 'VITAMIN K AND BONE HEALTH: AN UPDATED SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS'. SPRINGER LONDON LTD OSTEOPOROSIS INTERNATIONAL, Valencia, SPAIN: 1st IOF-ESCEO Pre-Clinical Symposium 22, pp. 342-343.

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