Surrey in the Media

THE: Hackney has become ‘focus of academic study’

12 September 2014

Dr Sarah Neal, reader in sociology at the University of Surrey, told the Royal Geographical Society’s annual international conference that Hackney had become a focus of academic study owing to the social change seen there over the past 30 years.

THE, Monday 1 September 2014

THE: UUK president calls for ‘stability’ from politicians

12 September 2014

Professor Sir Christopher Snowden, the University of Surrey and UUK president, spoke on the opening day of UUK’s annual conference, where he called  for “a 10-year plan to increase public investment in research” and “a change in government immigration policy” on international students.

THE, Tuesday 9 September 2014

BBC: Selfie science: Taking the perfect snap

12 September 2014

Have you ever wished your holiday snaps looked just a little crisper, or wondered why your nose looks big in a selfie?  Drs Radu Sporea and Andrew Pye from the University of Surrey are on a mission to help us make the most out of our digital cameras.

BBC, Saturday 6 September 2014

The Engineer: Graphene turns rubber bands into stretchy body sensors

12 September 2014

Researchers from the University of Surrey have found a way to turn rubber bands into cheap, flexible body monitoring sensors by infusing them with graphene.

The Engineer, Tuesday 2 September 2014

The Huffington Post: Brits 'Bad' at Languages: A Belief Worth Challenging

20 August 2014

Dr Lucy Bell writes: "We are constantly being told Britons are 'bad' at languages. Recent reports, which have used the terms of 'crisis' and 'language skills deficit' to describe the state of languages in the UK, have been taken as proof of this. Yet this lack of confidence is arguably fuelling the vicious circle of foreign language decline.  It is easy to find evidence to back up the idea of a national 'language crisis'. The statistics are widely available: the last decade has seen a steep decline in students taking a language at GCSE; the number of students studying French and German at A-level almost halved since 2003; 40% of languages departments have shut down in British universities over the last 15 years.

The Huffington Post , Wednesday 6 August 2014

The Guardian: Adjustment was the best decision I've ever made

20 August 2014

Penny Wright, 22, has just graduated from the University of Surrey but was originally expecting to go to Oxford Brookes. "I studied food technology, biology and statistics at A-level," she says. I was predicted mostly Bs, but when my grades came back I realised I had done slightly better than expected."  Choosing Adjustment was not a difficult decision for Wright. "I had already been to the Surrey campus to have a look around. I much preferred the university but had dismissed it as I didn't think I would get the grades I needed to go there. So it was a bit of a no-brainer to switch and study at Surrey," she says.

The Guardian, Thursday 7 August 2014

BBC News South: 5G Innovation Centre

20 August 2014

Professor Nora Kearney and Keith Robson feature on BBC News South, speaking about the development and future applications of 5G.

BBC News South, Wednesday 13 August 2014

The Times: Rubber bands could be used to monitor baby’s breathing

20 August 2014

Dr Alan Dalton's research into graphene-infused rubber bands could lead to revolutionary health sensors reports The Times.

The Times, Wednesday 20 August 2014

The Guardian: NHS staffing guidelines: it would be a mistake to set minimum levels

25 July 2014

Adequate staffing levels, although necessary, are not enough to guarantee safe and high quality care argues Professor Graham Cookson.

The Guardian, Monday 21 July 2014

Electronics Weekly: NPL and universities to reshape UK science agenda

25 July 2014

The National Physical Laboratory (NPL) has signed a collaborative partnership with the Universities of Strathclyde and Surrey.

Electronics Weekly, Thursday 10 July 2014

Daily Mail: Body clock determines how effective drugs will be: The time of day you take your tablets affects their potency, study finds

24 July 2014

Scientists at the University of Surrey have shown that the body clock has a profound role in altering the concentration of different molecules in our blood.  The finding means that the amount of sleep we have had, the levels of light to which we are exposed and the timing of our meals could all alter on the way drugs work on our body.

Daily Mail , Monday 7 July 2014

The Guardian: Breathing life into modern foreign language A-levels

24 July 2014

Dr Dawn Marley, Senior Lecturer in French, writes: "As part of its revamp of the A-level curriculum, the government has launched a consultation on the way modern languages are taught at sixth form. If introduced, the changes herald a real boost to the teaching of A and AS modern languages, that could help reinvigorate subjects which have been waning in schools and universities."

The Guardian, Wednesday 23 July 2014

The Independent: eBay hack: Users asked to change passwords

30 May 2014

Following the news that eBay account details were hacked earlier this year Professor Alan Woodward commented on what this means for users and why security flaws led to the e-tailer being compromised.

The Independent, Wednesday 21 May 2014

TIME Magazine: Concerns in Europe after far-right gains in E.U. elections

30 May 2014

Dr Simon Usherwood, an expert on European politics at the University of Surrey, said that extremist groups stood to benefit in the coming five years.  “They will get time for speaking in debates, the chairmanship of certain committees, which means that they’re going to have much more of a platform on which they can sell their message to voters,” he commented.

TIME Magazine, Monday 26 May 2014

New Electronics: Multispectral light sensor set to improve medical imaging

30 May 2014

Researchers from the University of Surrey have created a multispectral light sensor that can detect the full spectrum of light, from UV to visible and near infrared.

New Electronics, Friday 23 May 2014

BBC News Online: 'Arrogance' of ignoring need for sleep

30 May 2014

The BBC ran a series of features and interviews investigating a day of the body clock. Prominent coverage for Surrey Sleep Centre included the Today programme, BBC News website, BBC News Channel, BBC World Service, the Financial Times, the Daily Mail, the Daily Telegraph, Times of India and the Metro.

BBC News Online , Monday 12 May 2014

The Guardian: Student union officers – more 'representatives' than activists

7 April 2014

What balance should student-union officers strike between partnership with university managers and campaigning on behalf of students? Research by Professor Rachel Brooks examines the changing role of student representatives.

The Guardian, Thursday 3 April 2014

Sky News: Interview with Dr Alf Crossman following Bob Crow's death

14 March 2014

Following the death of RMT union leader Bob Crow, Dr Alf Crossman is interviewed live on Sky News' Jeff Randall Business show.

Sky News, Tuesday 11 March 2014

The Gadget Show: Surrey Space Centre's Virtual Ride to Space

14 March 2014

A new Kickstarter project from the University of Surrey is aiming to let you experience the full journey to space, all thanks to the Oculus Rift virtual reality headset. 

The Gadget Show, Friday 7 March 2014

The Daily Mail: The £10 prostate test: New cancer check is twice as accurate - with no need for that embarrassing examination

6 March 2014

The University of Surrey has struck a deal with two companies and it is hoped it will be in doctors’ surgeries later this year. Private patients will be the first to benefit but NHS use could follow.

The Daily Mail , Wednesday 5 March 2014

The Guardian: Jet lag and night shifts disrupt rhythm of hundreds of genes, study shows

30 January 2014

Scientists from the University of Surrey say ailments linked to jet lag and nightshift work may have their roots in disruption of gene activity.

The Guardian, Tuesday 21 January 2014

THE: Transplant inspires siblings’ Bloodlines project

30 January 2014

A sister and brother have created an “augmented lecture” incorporating music, dance and animation inspired by their experiences as bone marrow donor and recipient. When Milton Mermikides, lecturer in music at the University of Surrey, collapsed in London’s Bond Street in November 2004, he was rapidly diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Despite odds of only one in four, his lone sibling Alex Mermikides, senior lecturer in drama at Kingston University, was a life-saving transplant match.

THE, Thursday 30 January 2014

BBC News Online: University of Surrey physics applications 'rise by 82% in a year'

30 January 2014

Applications to study physics at the University of Surrey have almost doubled in the past year.  Professor Jim Al-Khalili said the department had its 1,000th applicant this week, compared with 525 applications at the same time in 2013.

BBC News Online , Saturday 25 January 2014

BBC News Online: Pupils from poor families 'still at disadvantage'

30 January 2014

Children from poor backgrounds must do even better in key academic subjects to get on in life, researchers have said.  The researchers from the Institute of Education and the University of Surrey analysed major national collections of information on the attainment of children born between 1958 and 2000.

BBC News Online , Friday 24 January 2014

Financial Times: How to prevent satellite collisions

15 January 2014

The European Space Agency plans to test a relatively cheap and simple technique for safely 'de-orbiting' satellites so that they do not hang around in space when their working life is over.  Developed at Surrey Space Centre, the technology uses a light 25sq m 'gossamer sail'.

Financial Times (hardcopy only), Saturday 11 January 2014

BBC News Online: BBC computer server ‘was hacked’

15 January 2014

A Russian hacker took control of a BBC computer server, attempting to sell access to other cybercriminals. Professor Alan Woodward comments on the dangers of insecure FTP (file transfer protocol) connections.

BBC News Online , Tuesday 31 December 2013

The Observer: The best of British start-ups

15 January 2014

SETsquared Bristol is listed as one of the top British start-ups. It is an enterprise collaboration between the Universities of Surrey, Bath, Bristol, Exeter and Southampton. It was recently ranked fourth best business incubator in the world.

Observer Tech Monthly (hardcopy only), Saturday 11 January 2014

The Times: Nearly half of women suffer ‘carb guilt’

15 January 2014

A survey of 3,000 people found that women were around twice as likely to suffer from ‘carb guilt’ even though they are more likely to be a healthy weight - Professor Jane Ogden, Health Psychology.

The Times (hardcopy only), Monday 30 December 2013

Forbes: ESA's new gossamer sail system aims to float dangerous space junk to a fiery death

24 December 2013

The sail, which was developed by the University of Surrey’s Space Centre, has been subjected to rigorous testing, including thermal, vibration and vacuum tests. Professor Viaos Lappas and his team are  hoping to see it get its first tryout in orbit using a demonstration satellite by the end of 2014, providing it can get a piggy-back launch opportunity.

Forbes, Tuesday 24 December 2013

BBC News: University of Surrey vet school buildings approved

22 November 2013

Three buildings are to be constructed at the University of Surrey to house a new £45m school of veterinary medicine.  Guildford Borough Council has granted planning permission for the buildings on the Manor Park campus.

BBC News, Friday 29 November 2013

Daily Telegraph: Brain chemical helps beat jet lag

22 November 2013

A remedy for jet lag could be on the horizon after scientists discovered that a key brain chemical can reset our body clock.  Boosting levels of a key chemical in the brain could help us overcome jet lag twice as quickly as normal, scientists claim.  Dr Jonathan Johnston, a reader in Chronobiology and Integrative Physiology at the University of Surrey, said it was unclear whether the findings could help minimise jet lags in humans.  "The body's master clock is found in a part of the brain called the 'suprachiamtic nuceli," he explained.

Daily Telegraph, Tuesday 29 October 2013

The Huffington Post: It's not just a cigarette box - smokers have become walking adverts

29 October 2013

Professor Jane Ogden and colleagues from the School of Psychology have just published an analysis of 240 print adverts randomly selected from the years 1950 to 2000 that appeared in the UK. The findings are pretty clear. Early adverts focused on men, women (even children), fun, health and the outdoors and the box was pretty much absent.  But in later years as policies began to limit their advertising possibilities the box became more and more present; a dominant feature in the ads.

The Huffington Post , Tuesday 29 October 2013

Daily Mail: Desperate for a good night's sleep?

29 October 2013

Experts advise tweaking your lighting throughout the day.  "If you want to feel alert in the mornings, for instance when you go into the office, it's best to use fluorescent bright lighting,' explains Debra Skene, professor of neuroendocrinology at the University of Surrey.

Daily Mail , Tuesday 22 October 2013

BBC: How the modern world depends on encryption

29 October 2013

Encryption makes the modern world go round. Every time you make a mobile phone call, buy something with a credit card in a shop or on the web, or even get cash from an ATM, encryption bestows upon that transaction the confidentiality and security to make it possible.  "If you consider electronic transactions and online payments, all those would not be possible without encryption," said Dr Mark Manulis, a senior lecturer in cryptography at the University of Surrey.

BBC News Online , Saturday 26 October 2013

The Times: Academics back new Hinkley Point plant

29 October 2013

Senior academics have welcomed the construction of a new £16 billion nuclear plant in Hinkley Point, arguing in a letter to The Times that it is a necessary step for the modernisation of our energy infrastructure.  Professor Paddy Regan from University of Surrey, one of 17 academics to sign a letter backing the deal, said that almost as important as its energy contribution is the fact it is happening at all.  

The Times, Monday 28 October 2013

New Scientist: First physical evidence of why you're an owl or a lark

2 October 2013

Derk-Jan Dijk, professor of sleep and physiology, comments on a recent study in the journal NeuroImage regarding sleep and wakefulness chronotypes.

New Scientist , Tuesday 1 October 2013

BBC News: Greece's far-right Golden Dawn party

2 October 2013

Dr Theofanis Exadaktylos, Lecturer in European Politics, comments on Greece's far-right party.

BBC News , Wednesday 2 October 2013

The Daily Telegraph : Reduce working week to 30 hours, say economists

18 September 2013

Claims made in a new book by the New Economics Foundation - Professor Tim Jackson, CES, is one of the book contributors.

Daily Telegraph

ITV Meridian: From West Wittering to the moon or Mars!

3 September 2013

The beach at West Wittering is a beautiful place to sunbathe and relax but it also provides the perfect training ground for prototype space rovers. A team from Surrey University have been testing the machines that could one day be sent to the moon or Mars. 

BBC Radio 4: What 4G and 5G means to you

3 September 2013

Professor Rahim Tafazolli, Director of the new 5G Innovation Centre, on BBC Radio 4's consumer show 'You and Yours' about 4G phone technology.

BBC Radio 4 You and Yours, Tuesday 3 September 2013

The Conversation: Sugar hysteria won’t solve the obesity puzzle

2 September 2013

Professor Jane Ogden writes: "Obesity is on the increase. And so are the numbers of theories all blaming different offenders. Culprit of the month is sugar, with researchers arguing that high levels of sugar in fizzy drinks, sweets and processed foods not only cause aggression and behavioural problems in children but also diabetes, obesity and hidden fat – even in those who look thin."

The Conversation , Friday 30 August 2013

Daily Mail: Are you a lark or a night owl?

2 September 2013

Being a night owl or lark may be largely dictated by a gene known as Period-3.  Scientists at the University of Surrey discovered there are two versions of this gene — a long version and a short version. Those with the long version are larks; the short version, owls.

Daily Mail , Thursday 15 August 2013

BBC News: Hacker 'shouts abuse' via Foscam baby monitoring camera

14 August 2013

A hacker was able to shout abuse at a two-year-old child by exploiting a vulnerability in a camera advertised as an ideal "baby monitor".

BBC News, Wednesday 14 August 2013

BBC Radio: The grim trail of bacteria left by flies in hot weather

8 August 2013

Dr Simon Park tells BBC Surrey about how the hot spell and resultant increased activities by flies in the kitchen or across picnic food has led to grisly calling cards being left in the form of bacterial deposits. 

BBC Surrey, Thursday 8 August 2013

Aljazeera English: Prof Alan Woodward comments on cybersecurity hacks in Syria

7 August 2013

Hackers from the Syrian Electronic Army have continued to attack high profile targets including the blogs at Channel 4 News.

Prof Alan Woodward of the Department of Computing comments.

Aljazeera English, Wednesday 7 August 2013

The Huffington Post: Banning packed lunches is a step too far

24 July 2013

Professor Jane Ogden from the University of Surrey writes: "The government wants to improve children's diets by banning packed lunches and barring children from leaving school at lunchtime to prevent them from buying unhealthy food. School lunches are healthier, the government says.  They've earmarked £15m to subsidise school meals and offer breakfast clubs for those kids arriving hungry at school in the mornings.  Childhood obesity is an increasing problem and is caused by a simple imbalance between energy in (food) and energy out (exercise and activity) and any attempt at prevention or cure needs to address this imbalance.

The Huffington Post , Wednesday 24 July 2013

FT: Space Mission

22 July 2013

Surrey Business School is boldly going where no business schools have gone before - at least in the UK. It is working with Satellite Applications Catapult. a technology and innovation centre, to develop and executive MBA programme for the UK's space industry. (no link available).

Independent: From Swindon to the Solar System: UK Space Agency aims to capture 10 per cent of the industry

19 July 2013

"It’s easy to laugh, but Britain is making steady progress in the space race. And with £40bn up for grabs, we should take it seriously", says The Independent

Independent, Tuesday 16 July 2013

C4 News: Is electronic tagging too costly and out of date?

15 July 2013

In the wake of revelations about overcharging by Serco and G4S over electronic monitoring of offenders, Channel 4 News asks if tagging is in need of an upgrade.

Channel 4 News, Saturday 13 July 2013

Guardian: Work experience: how to enhance students' job prospects

15 July 2013

Many universities are taking it upon themselves to offer work experience and industry placements to improve graduate's prospects. 

Guardian , Friday 12 July 2013

The Press Association: Leprosy DNA analysed from bones

24 June 2013

DNA from the bones of medieval leprosy victims is helping scientists improve their understanding of the disease.  Lead scientist Professor Graham Stewart, from the University of Surrey, said: "Understanding diseases from the past will help us predict emerging infectious diseases and potentially suggest how we may be better able to control existing diseases.  We hope to analyse even older DNA, tracing leprosy and also tuberculosis back to their origins in human history."

The Press Association, Thursday 13 June 2013

The Conversation: Should Brady be kept alive? The ethics of force-feeding

20 June 2013

Dr Ann Gallagher, Reader in Nursing Ethics at University of Surrey, writes: " Moors murderer, Ian Brady, is fighting to end his life. This week he has appeared in public for the first time since his trial in the 1960s. He has been force-fed for the past 13 years and is begging to be ruled sane and transferred to a prison in Scotland where he will be allowed to starve himself to death."

The Conversation, Thursday 20 June 2013

Daily Telegraph: The astonishing courage of Ethiopian women left me in awe

20 May 2013

Dr Karen Ballard, a senior lecturer in Women’s Health at the University of Surrey, writes about the her year in Ethiopia caring for pregnant women in a rural clinic.

Daily Telegraph , Friday 17 May 2013

New York Times: The Ethics of Force-Feeding Inmates

9 May 2013

On the issue of 100 inmates at Guantánamo Bay starving themselves, Dr Ann Gallagher, Reader (Nursing Ethics) and Director of the International Centre for Nursing Ethics, says 'patients, not politics, are nurses’ concern'.

New York Times, Thursday 16 May 2013

BBC News: Exploding the urban myths about how to stay safe online

25 April 2013

Professor Alan Woodward writes: "Are we wising up to the dangers lurking online? Or are phishing, spam and hacking just words that we still do not understand and we hope will not happen to us."

British Forces News: Drone Strikes research

27 March 2013

Professor Mike Aaronson discuss a new report from Surrey's Centre for International Intervention in the School of Politics which shows the British public is divided about whether drones make them more or less safe.

BBC: Hackers attack several BBC Twitter accounts

22 March 2013

Several BBC Twitter accounts, including its weather, Arabic and Radio Ulster feeds were hijacked by a group calling itself Syrian Electronic Army earlier.

BBC R4; Tourism a prize worth fighting for

12 March 2013

Professor Graham Miller, Head of the School of Hospitality and Tourism Management at the University of Surrey, has been interviewed on Radio 4’s Today programme talking about the positive impacts of tourism on local economies.

BBC R4, Tuesday 12 March 2013

The Independent: As universities struggle to maintain student numbers, how did Surrey manage to grow by a third?

28 February 2013

The University of Surrey saw applications rise by a staggering 38 per cent for 2013, with the UK and EU figure going up by 39 per cent, while the number of overseas students rose by 31 per cent.  Its vice-chancellor, Professor Sir Christopher Snowden, attributes the rise to a number of factors that have brought about a remarkable transformation since its modest beginnings as the Battersea Polytechnic Institute in 1891.  "I think a major factor has been the quality of our courses – the average student at Surrey now has two A grades and a B grade," he says. The average A-level point score of entrants has increased by 100 points since 2005.

The Independent, Thursday 28 February 2013

BBC News - Bad sleep 'dramatically' alters body

28 February 2013

A run of poor sleep can have a potentially profound effect on the internal workings of the human body, say University of Surrey researchers.  The activity of hundreds of genes was altered when people's sleep was cut to less than six hours a day for a week. Researchers analysed the blood of 26 people after they had had plenty of sleep, up to 10 hours each night for a week, and compared the results with samples after a week of fewer than six hours a night.  More than 700 genes were altered by the shift. Each contains the instructions for building a protein, so those that became more active produced more proteins - changing the chemistry of the body.

BBC News Online , Monday 25 February 2013

BBC News - Smartphone fired into space

28 February 2013

A smartphone has been blasted into orbit from India by a team of researchers from the University of Surrey.  Weighing 4.3 kg (9.5lbs) and measuring 10cm by 30cm (4in by 12in), the satellite has been developed by the University of Surrey's Space Centre (SSC) and Surrey Satellite Technology (SSTL).

BBC News Online , Monday 25 February 2013

ITV: 4G? What about the 5th generation?

20 February 2013

With today's announcement that 4G is confirmed for roll out across the UK later this year, what does the future hold for mobile data services?

BBC News: Queen bestows Regius Professorship on University of Surrey

19 February 2013

The electronic engineering department at the University of Surrey has been awarded a prestigious professorship by the Queen to mark her Diamond Jubilee.

BBC , Monday 11 February 2013

Daily Mail: UK to launch first-ever satellite controlled by a mobile phone

19 February 2013

British space scientists are gearing up to launch the world's first satellite run entirely using a mobile phone.  The unique STRaND-1 satellite, developed by researchers from the University of Surrey, will be fully controlled by a Google Nexus phone during part of its six-month space mission.  It will launch into a 785km sun-synchronous orbit on the Indian Space Research Organisation's Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) from Sriharikota, India, on February 25.

Daily Mail , Tuesday 12 February 2013

Daily Mail: So that's why you're so full of air

19 February 2013

The embarrassment associated with passing wind means many people ‘catastrophise’ the symptom, which makes it seem worse in their own mind, says Jane Ogden, professor of health psychology at the University of Surrey.  ‘All symptoms — whether it’s wind, or back pain, or tiredness — are perceptions, and are made worse by being distracted or worried about it.’

Daily Mail , Tuesday 19 February 2013

BBC Radio 4 World Tonight: Prof Craig Underwood on importance of quality research

29 January 2013

Deputy Director of the Surrey Space Centre, Professor Craig Underwood discusses the importance of quality postgraduate research and links to industry. At 34 mins on the timeline.

BBC Radio 4 World Tonight, Tuesday 29 January 2013

BBC Radio 4: Any Questions?

28 January 2013

The prestigious radio panel show “Any Questions?” has been broadcast from the University of Surrey. Eric Pickles, MP, Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government, was one of the panel guests answering questions from the audience.

BBC Radio 4, Thursday 24 January 2013

BBC: 'Red October' cyber-attack found by Russian researchers

14 January 2013

A major cyber-attack that may have been stealing confidential documents since 2007 has been discovered by Russian researchers. One expert described the attack find as "very significant". "It appears to be trying to suck up all the usual things," said Prof Alan Woodward, from the University of Surrey.

New Statesman: 4G's so last year: why we need 5G, and now

4 January 2013

We have a spectrum crunch on our hands, and technology is only just starting to deal with that.

new statesman , Monday 7 January 2013

Al Jazeera English: Bodymetric scan developed for online shopping

3 January 2013

Finding clothes that fit perfectly can be a perennial problem for the fashion conscious. However, a new smartphone application developed in the UK could change that - it uses bodymetric scanning to identify your exact size and fit.

Al Jazeera, Wednesday 2 January 2013

BBC web - Viewpoint: How hackers exploit 'the seven deadly sins'

17 December 2012

The Royal Academy of Engineering magazine: Profile of VC

12 December 2012

The magazine, like the Academy itself, crosses the boundaries between engineering disciplines. "Few engineers have moved between business and academia as fluently and as often as Professor Sir Christopher Snowden", says the article.

Ingenia, Wednesday 5 December 2012

BBC News: Viewpoint: Small firms prove to be weak link to hackers

23 November 2012

Small businesses - those employing a few hundred people or less - are increasingly becoming the target of hackers, Professor Alan Woodward tells the BBC.

BBC, Tuesday 20 November 2012

Daily Mail: Online 'virtual tape measure' promises an end to ill-fitting clothes...and a perfect fit in EVERY shop

22 November 2012

A revolutionary 'virtual tape measure'  - known as Body Shape Recognition For Online Fashion - promises to make badly fitting clothes (and even badly lit fitting rooms) a thing of the past, advising the user on which size dress, trouser or top they should buy in every retailer.
 

Daily Mail, Thursday 22 November 2012

THE: Surrey announces plans for new vet school

30 October 2012

The first new vet school south of London is to be constructed around the theme that human and animal health is intrinsically linked.  The University of Surrey's School of Veterinary Medicine will embrace the "One Health - One Medicine" philosophy, which encourages collaborations between physicians, veterinarians, dentists, nurses and other scientific health-related disciplines.

THE, Saturday 27 October 2012

Daily Telegraph - Banks need to 'charge more for SME loans’

30 October 2012

Research by the University of Surrey commissioned by Kingston Smith found that “the attitude of SMEs towards banks ranges from disappointment to contempt”. It found that “not only do banks not provide the capital required, they seem to know very little about what [small] businesses need”.

Daily Telegraph , Tuesday 23 October 2012

Daily Mail: Scientists send mobile phone into orbit to see if 'anyone could hear you scream'

30 October 2012

'In space no one can hear you scream'... or can they?
The veracity of the famous tagline from Ridley Scott's 1979 sci-fi blockbuster is to be put to the test next month when the sounds of human screams are played in space.

daily mail, Saturday 27 October 2012

5G research centre gets major funding grant

9 October 2012

The UK has only just seen the launch of 4G (fourth generation) mobile communication technology, but academics at Surrey University are already looking at its successor.

The Chronicle: Journeys to the Ends of the Earth

26 September 2012

Over the past decade, global warming has melted polar sea ice down to record lows - but during the same period, thanks to a growing awareness of the climate phenomenon, the Arctic and the Antarctic have vastly expanded in the popular imagination. Adeline Johns-Putra, a scholar of Romantic literature at the University of Surrey who has spent the last year studying climate change's impact on the modern novel, says she returned to Eleanor Porden with newly opened eyes. "I had been interested in Porden for a long time as a 19th-century woman with interests in science and history and poetry ... who was trying all the time to bring these interests together," says Johns-Putra, who is writing a biography of Porden.

The Chronicle , Wednesday 26 September 2012

THE: The best course for you may not be at the 'best' university

20 September 2012

Universities UK vice-president Sir Christopher Snowden tells John Morgan of his concerns over 'government rhetoric'.  David Willetts, the universities and science minister, is wrong to talk about getting students into "the best universities", according to the vice-chancellor who is a potential next president of UUK. Sir Christopher Snowden, president and vice-chancellor of the University of Surrey and the current vice-president of UUK, noted that Mr Willetts "talks about [how] 'students should be able to go the best universities".

THE, Wednesday 19 September 2012

The Guardian: Soon science could enable us all to run as fast as Usain Bolt

19 September 2012

Johnjoe McFadden, professor of molecular genetics at the University of Surrey, comments: "One of the biggest scientific research projects in recent years has just unveiled its results. The Encode consortium, consisting of 442 researchers working in 32 institutes around the world, has spent the last five years studying a representative 1% of our genome. The findings may help to revolutionise medicine, but could also provide us with novel ways of tinkering with our minds and bodies."

BBC News: More malware targeting Iran could yet be discovered

19 September 2012

Fresh analysis of the malware Flame suggests it could be part of a much wider "family". Flame is believed to have targeted sensitive data in Iran. It has already been linked to Stuxnet, which was aimed at Iran's nuclear infrastructure.  Analysis of the server controlling the malware suggests three similar pieces of code are as yet undiscovered. The new report is a joint study from security firms Symantec, Kasperksy, the Crypto Labs in Budapest and the UN's International Telecommunications Union. They were given access to the command and control servers of Flame. It revealed the servers were using four communications protocols, only one of which was being used by Flame. "I can't imagine that the other three were not being used. The conclusion seems to be that there is something else out there," said Prof Alan Woodward, a visiting professor at the University of Surrey's department of computing.

BBC News Online , Wednesday 19 September 2012

BIS: New Board members appointed to the Technology Strategy Board

19 September 2012

Business Secretary Vince Cable has announced the appointment of two new members and the reappointment of three Members to the Governing Board of the UK’s innovation agency, the Technology Strategy Board.  The newly-appointed board members are Douglas Richard and Hazel Moore, who will serve on the Board up to 30 June 2015. The reappointed board members are Professor Sir Christopher Snowden, Sara Murray and Stewart Davies who will serve for a further period of three years, also up to 30 June 2015.

BIS, Monday 27 August 2012

BBC News Online: How to sleep in hot weather

21 August 2012

"As a species, we are diurnal," says Dr Malcolm von Schantz, a molecular neuroscientist at the University of Surrey's Sleep Centre.  "We have evolved to sleep in a consolidated way during the night, when it is cooler and darker. Too cold or too hot temperatures during the night act as a natural alarm clock.  In Northern Europe, most of us have mechanisms in place to keep our homes warm during the winter, but not to keep them cool during the summer."

BBC News Online , Monday 20 August 2012

Daily Mail: Olympic sex: Why going for gold in the bedroom won't actually ruin your sporting performance the next day

13 August 2012

Martin Milton, an expert in psychotherapeutic and counselling psychology at the University of Surrey, comments on the impact of sex on athletes’ performance during Olympics.  

Daily Mail , Tuesday 31 July 2012

Financial Times: Universities play role in developing athletes

8 August 2012

Universities are the background to much great British sporting history.  A defining moment of London 2012 can also be traced back to British academia. Mo Farah, the 10,000m gold medallist, was trained at St Mary’s University College’s £8.5m Endurance Performance and Coaching Centre in Twickenham.  Farah was not a student, but was based at the elite centre, which is a partnership between the college, Athletics UK and the London Marathon.  These partnerships are increasingly common. Paul Blanchard, Head of University of Surrey's sports park, said: “Outside football and rugby union, basically every sport requires a partnership to develop their athletes.”

Financial Times, Tuesday 7 August 2012

BBC Radio 4: Space industry and the University's Research Park

20 July 2012

BBC looks at so-called 'gazelle' companies which are vibrant and need encouraging including companies at the University's Research Park. Go to 40:00 mins on the link: http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01kt43q/World_at_One_19_07_2012

Financial Times: Laser redesign takes the heat off the internet

16 July 2012

The internet is a voracious consumer of energy and generator of waste heat – and the semiconductor lasers used to transmit data as light pulses are responsible for a lot of the power consumption.  While new ways are being found to cool computers – for example, giant server farms built beside the northern Baltic Sea pump the ice-cold water available there around the buildings – a more fundamental solution has been developed by physicists at the University of Surrey.  Researchers have redesigned the laser in a way that does not require a costly change to the manufacturing process. Although the change sounds small (replacing 10 per cent of arsenic or phosphorus atoms in the semiconductor with bismuth), it greatly reduces the energy consumption. “We want the lasers to emit as much energy as possible as light rather than heat,” says Stephen Sweeney, head of photonics at Surrey. “We believe we can achieve a five- to 10-fold reduction in energy demand relating to the internet.”

Financial Times , Sunday 15 July 2012

Financial Times: Business traveller: Strategies for sleep

27 June 2012

Along with jet-lag, business travellers often have to contend with a lack of sleep or fragmented sleep.  “What ultimately determines your overall performance is the total amount of sleep over 24 hours,” says Derk-Jan Dijk, professor of sleep and physiology at the University of Surrey. “If you can only sleep for four hours at night, a two-hour nap really will pay off.” While many people find it odd to sleep outside normal hours, an afternoon with no meetings is a great sleeping opportunity, he adds.

Financial Times , Wednesday 27 June 2012

THE: Playing at war, pestilence and death (but it's only a model - shh)

21 June 2012

Simulations and games can be highly effective in helping to teach students about politics and war - but often suffer from oversimplification, a lack of clear purpose or insufficient time to explore issues meaningfully.  These were among the views put forward at a workshop held at the University of Westminster earlier this month - on the use of games to model everything from the effects of a global pandemic to last year's London riots.  Simon Usherwood, senior lecturer in politics at the University of Surrey, opened the event by exploring 'the problems of making simulations work'.

THE, Thursday 21 June 2012

The Times: Universities vie for brightest students with VIP treatment

11 June 2012

Universities are offering VIP packages and deluxe open days to entice students to choose them over their competitors.  The University of Surrey is offering a Chancellor's scholarship worth £3,000 for the first year.  Applicants must achieve AAA* and put the University as their first choice.

The Times , Monday 11 June 2012

BBC: Massive cyber-attack discovered, researchers say

30 May 2012

A complex targeted cyber-attack that collected private data from countries such as Israel and Iran has been uncovered, researchers have said.

BBC News, Tuesday 29 May 2012

IEEE news: A Knight Among Us

24 May 2012

IEEE Fellow Christopher Snowden learned he had been knighted at the same time as everyone else in the United Kingdom - by picking up The Times and seeing his name on the list.

IEEE, Thursday 24 May 2012

The Guardian: How nursing should tackle its image problem

15 May 2012

Ann Gallagher comments: "This is not nursing's finest hour. The profession has been subjected to an onslaught with criticism coming from all quarters and recommendations for improvement coming from those outside the profession. One newspaper ran a five-day feature on the "crisis in nursing", culminating in a 10-point manifesto for change. The health service ombudsman for England recently said that the NHS should "act more like John Lewis and Marks & Spencer" and learn from complaints."

The Guardian, Tuesday 15 May 2012

BBC Radio 4: Seaweed, a Forgotten Food?

8 May 2012

Dr Margaret Rayman, Professor of Nutritional Medicine, discusses the use of seaweed in diets and the issue of iodine in the food.

BBC 4 Radio, Sunday 6 May 2012

Guardian: Mature students - would you consider living in halls?

4 May 2012

Leeland Crane, an undergraduate student at the University of Surrey, offers his opinions on whether mature students like himself would stay in halls or prefer to find private accommodation elsewhere

The Guardian, Friday 4 May 2012

Times Higher: Many universities are improving the experience for their students, as our survey shows

26 April 2012

The University of Surrey has rocketed up the latest survey of best student experience, according to the latest Times Higher Education Student Experience Survey.

The University leapt from 43 among UK universities to 15.

Times Higher, Thursday 26 April 2012

The Guardian: A guide to kick-starting your career while at university

24 April 2012

Alexandra Hemingway, professional development & employability tutor at the University of Surrey, comments: "The right time to start applying varies hugely from one job to the next: Any final year student who's trying to break into a graduate scheme really is well advised to apply early (like last October, in some cases). However, in sectors like publishing as well as many others, you're much more likely to be applying for individual, specific job opportunities rather than the large-scale programmes offered by most of the big multinationals."

The Guardian , Tuesday 17 April 2012

Daily Telegraph: Flirting men bored at work

23 April 2012

Men who flirt with female colleagues do so because they are bored of their job and lacking in sensitivity, University of Surrey psychologists claim.  A survey of 200 people found that flirty men had lower levels of job satisfaction, suggesting that rather than being a sign of passion their amorous behaviour could be down to ennui.

BBC News Breakfast: Why do teenagers struggle to get out of bed?

19 April 2012

Teenagers at a local school have studying their sleep patterns with the help of researchers at the Sleep Research Centre. Their project was reported on BBC News. See link. BBC website video

Page Owner: pro076
Page Created: Wednesday 22 June 2011 12:54:47 by mf0009
Last Modified: Thursday 18 August 2011 17:38:26 by pro053
Expiry Date: Saturday 22 September 2012 12:54:12
Assembly date: Tue Oct 21 19:08:10 BST 2014
Content ID: 59271
Revision: 3
Community: 1022