Academic Profiles

Research Interests

I have undertaken research on a number of different areas of people-environment relationships, whether in urban or rural environments, in domestic, work or leisure environments, on issues of health, environmental understanding, appreciation or change, there have been a number of key theoretical themes which have run through my research. My research has always been a) interdisciplinary, i.e., I have worked with architects, planners, landscape architects, environmental scientists, engineers, mathematicians, archaeologists, as well as sociologists and economists, b) international, with many projects undertaken with colleagues in Australia, France, Italy, Portugal, Spain, South Africa, Sweden, The Netherlands,  c) policy-oriented and applied. While I have undertaken a number of studies for national Research Councils (UK - ESRC, EPSRC, NERC; Sweden - FAS, Vetenskaprådet), much of my research has been supported by the EU, UK national and local governments, as well as industry and charitable trusts.

My early research was in the area of participation, in particular public participation in the urban planning process. This research not only focussed on the methods and mechanisms of participation – how can one involve the public more in decisions which affect their lives and environment and what are the constraints on and opportunities for greater public participation, but also what are the social, psychological and educational benefits for this kind of engagement in urban life, for the development of the individual and communities?  These research questions have continued to inform my research until the present day and have been addressed in a range of subsequent projects in different research domains.

A second theoretical interest has focussed on risk – people’s awareness of, attitudes towards and behaviours in response to risky situations and environments, and life under conditions of uncertainty. The areas investigated have included crime in urban environments and transport settings, risk and safety in recreational environments, perceived risk and concern about a) mining subsidence, b) the production of nuclear power, and disposal of nuclear and chemical waste, c) zoonotic diseases.

A third theoretical interest is examining the role of social and place identity as an intervening, mediating variable in affecting and encouraging environmental action. This research has led to highly cited publications in international journals such that my 1996 paper (with Clare Twigger-Ross, Jnl of Environmental Psychology, 1996; 490 citations) is the second highest cited publication in the field, after the originator of the concept. My work in this area is now examining the role of identity in the workplace.

Having undertaking research for many years examining the learning effectiveness of exhibitions and other interpretive media in museums and heritage sites, being practically involved in the planning, design, management and use of heritage facilities and services, my recent work has focussed writing critical theoretical commentaries on the ‘heritage industry’, with a particular emphasis on collective memory and identity. I was one of the International Advisors on the EU funded project CRIC: Cultural Heritage and the Reconstruction of Identities after Conflict (2008-2012), and I have recently started a new project with Jan Packer and Roy Ballantyne (University of Queensland colleagues): ‘On being Australian: Exploring the role of Anzac museum and heritage interpretive experiences in developing visitors’ sense of national identity’

For the last twenty years my research has addressed issues around mitigation and adaptation to climate change. I was the first psychologist in the UK (at an ESRC/UK Government conference) to discuss the contribution of psychology to this area, challenging the assumptions made by economists which then were driving UK government policy. Since that date, I have undertaken 24 research projects under the broad heading of sustainable development. Over the last 10 years this research has focussed on strategies for attitude and behaviour change, especially in the area of waste, transport and energy, as well as attitudes and practices in respect of climate change. In recent years the emphasis of my research has switched from changing consumer behaviour to examining the social and psychological constraints on and opportunities for changing production processes, because working ‘upstream’ offers the most effective way of achieving the significant changes that will be required if we are to meet national and international carbon reduction challenges. Over the past six years I have been leading a research programme with Professor Nora Räthzel (Umeå University) examining the policies and practices of national and international trade unions in respect of climate change mitigation (FAS), the opportunities and constraints on ‘heavy’ industry (Volvo trucks, Shell)  reducing the carbon emissions of the workforce both through the production process and the work practices and home lifestyles of their employees (EU-FP7), and the role of individuals as (climate) change agents within organisations (VR). Some of this work is published in Räthzel, N. and Uzzell, D. (2013) Trade Unions in the Green Economy: Working for the Environment, London: Earthscan/Routledge.

Research Collaborations

Professor Nora Räthzel, Department of Sociology, University of Umeå

Dr Ricardo Garcia Mira, University of La Coruna

Teaching

BSc in Psychology

PSY3026: Environmental Psychology

PSY3065: Dissertation Workshops

 

MSc Programme

PSYM013: Social Change and Influence

PSYM033     Inquiry and Design

                        Work, Health and Environment

PSYM014     Self and Identity in Context

PSYM027     Critical reflections on Social Psych research

                        Professional skills

PhD Supervision

Affiliations

British Psychological Society (Fellow)

International Association for People-Environment Studies

Current Research Projects

Research Area: Production, Labour and the Environment

 

Low Carbon at Work: Modelling Agents and Organisations to Achieve Transition to a Low Carbon Europe
Investigators: WP5 Leaders: David Uzzell (University of Surrey); Nora Räthzel (University of Umeå); Project Co-ordinator: Ricardo Garcia Mira (University of La Coruña)
Funded: EU – FP7
Website: http://www.locaw-fp7.com/


LOCAW involves the participation of seven other research organizations: University of Corunna-Spain (Co-ordinator); West University of Timisoara-Romania, James Hutton Research Institute, Aberdeen; University of Groningen, The Netherlands;  University of Rome La Sapienza-Italy.   

LOCAW is investigating six organizations in six European countries (Italy, The Netherlands, Romania, Spain, Sweden, UK) to understand the social macro and micro-level conditions which act as drivers for and constraints upon sustainable practices in production processes. Workpackage 5 focuses in particular on the relationship between energy consuming and GHG emitting practices at work and outside work in relation to heavy industry. The research is being undertaken through two case studies: Shell UK plc and Volvo Trucks (Umeå). Research questions:
• What are the management and trade union strategies to reduce the consumption of resources and GHG emissions?
• How do everyday practices in the workplace act as barriers and/or drivers for sustainable production at individual, organizational and societal levels?
• How do employees and managers relate their practices at the workplace to their practices outside the workplace? What kind of different and possibly contradictory practices and identities does the work-family interface create?
• What relationships and what forms of communication exist to support cooperation between employers, trade unions, and employees in transitioning to a sustainable, low-carbon society? What examples of good practice exist and what is necessary for them to flourish?

 

Moments of Danger, Moments of Opportunity: the Role of Individuals as Change Agents in Trade Unions
Investigators: Nora Räthzel (University of Umeå); David Uzzell (University of Surrey); Diana Mulinari (University of Lund), Annette Schnabel (University of Wuppertal)
Funded: Vetenskapsrådet/Swedish Research Council

Website: http://www.momentsofdanger.org/

 

This study will investigate the significance individuals as agents of change in trade unions. The analysis seeks to illuminate our understanding of the capacity of civil society organisations in general and TUs in particular to address the challenges of profound transformations at a national and international level. The study will analyse the role of individuals in developing new trade union policies against the background of global political, economic, and environmental changes. The unions selected are international, regional, national and local metalworkers and agricultural unions in Sweden, the UK, Spain, Brazil, South Africa and India. The research will combine qualitative methods of life-history and oral history with quantitative survey methods.

 

Publications

 

Räthzel, N. and Uzzell, D. (2013) Trade Unions in the Green Economy: Working for the Environment, London: Earthscan/Routledge.

Uzzell, D. and Räthzel, N. (2012) ‘Local Place and Global Space: Solidarity Across Borders and the Question of the Environment’, in N. Räthzel and D. Uzzell (eds) Trade Unions in the Green Economy: Working for the Environment, London: Earthscan/Routledge.

 

Uzzell, D.  and Räthzel, N. (2012). ‘Lokal plats, globalt rum. Solidaritet över gränserna och frågan om miljön’.  In Lindberg, I. & Neergaard, A. (eds.) Kapitalets Offensiv, Politikens Anpassning Och Fackens Globala Vägval, Stockholm: Premiss.

 

Uzzell, D. and Räthzel, N. (2012) ‘Mending the breach between labour and nature: A new research field’ Environmental Labour Studies’, in N. Räthzel and D. Uzzell (eds) Trade Unions in the Green Economy: Working for the Environment, London: Earthscan/Routledge

 

Räthzel, N. and Uzzell, D. (2012) Mending the breach between labour and nature: Environmental engagements of trade unions and the North-South divide, Interface: a Journal for and about Social Movements, 4, 2, 81-100

 

Uzzell, D.  and Räthzel, N. (2012). ‘Lokal plats, globalt rum. Solidaritet över gränserna och frågan om miljön’.  In Lindberg, I. & Neergaard, A. (eds.) Kapitalets Offensiv, Politikens Anpassning Och Fackens Globala Vägval, Stockholm: Premiss.

 

Räthzel, N. and Uzzell, D. (2011) Natur oder Arbeit? Dilemmata und Perspektiven gewerkschaftlicher Umweltpolitik, Das Argument (Journal of Philosophy and Social Sciences), 249, 734 - 744.

 

Räthzel, N. and Uzzell, D. (2011) ‘Trade Unions and Climate Change: The Jobs versus Environment Dilemma’, Global Environmental Change, 21, 1215–1223

 

Räthzel, N., Uzzell, D. and Elliot, D. (2010). ‘Can trade unions become environmental innovators?’ Soundings, 46, 76 - 87

 

Contact Me

E-mail:
Phone: 01483 68 9430

Find me on campus
Room: 20 AD 04

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My office hours

08.30 - 17.00

Publications

Highlights

  • Murtagh N, Gatersleben B, Uzzell D. (2012) 'Self-identity Threat and Resistance to Change: Evidence from Regular Travel Behaviour'. Elsevier Journal of Environmental Psychology, 32 (4), pp. 318-326.

    Abstract

    Despite widespread acceptance of the need to change individual behaviour towards sustainability, resistance to change remains a continuing challenge. Past behaviour or habit, and psychological reactance, have been explored as components of resistance. Growing evidence for the influence of self-identity on behaviour suggests self-identity as a further factor. The current study draws on Identity Process Theory (Breakwell, 1986) to propose that threat to self-identity contributes to resistance to change, over and above the influence of past behaviour. Using travel-related vignettes to trigger threat, a study with 295 working parents in England found evidence supporting the relationship between self-identity threat and resistance to change travel behaviour, controlling for past behaviour. The findings further suggest identity threat as an alternative theoretical perspective on reactance. The results build theoretical understanding of resistance as a barrier to behaviour change. The application of an identity theory to understanding resistance is argued to add potentially new ways to encourage change towards sustainable behaviour. In addition, the findings suggest rich avenues for future research on the theoretical and empirical implications of the relationship of identities and sustainable behaviours.

  • Uzzell D, Vasileiou K, Marcu A, Barnett J. (2012) 'Whose Lyme is it anyway? Subject Positions and the Construction of Responsibility for Managing the Health Risk of Lyme Disease'. Health and Place, 18 (5), pp. 1101-1109.
  • Räthzel N, Uzzell D. (2011) 'Trade Unions and Climate Change: The Jobs versus Environment Dilemma'. Elsevier Global Environmental Change Part A, 21 (4), pp. 1215-1223.

    Abstract

    Trade unions are actively engaging with the climate change agenda and formulating climate change policies. Although governments are placing considerable effort on changing consumer behaviour, arguably the most significant impacts on climate change will be through changes in production. Even changes in consumption will have consequences for production. Changes in production will affect workers through the loss of jobs, the changing of jobs, and the creation of new jobs. The jobs versus environment dilemma is a significant issue affecting workers worldwide. In this paper we focus on the ways in which international trade unions are conceptualising the relationship between jobs and the environment, which provide the point of departure from which climate change policies can be formulated. Extended interviews were conducted with senior policy makers in national and international trade unions. On the basis of their responses, four discourses of trade union engagement with climate change are discussed: ‘technological fix’, ‘social transformation’, ‘mutual interests’ and ‘social movement’ discourses, which were theorised in the context of the different international histories and models of trade unionism. All discourses imply a re-invention of unions as social movements but do not see nature as a partner in human development.

  • Quine CP, Barnett J, Dobson ADM, Marcu A, Marzano M, Moseley D, O'Brien L, Randolph SE, Taylor JL, Uzzell D. (2011) 'Frameworks for risk communication and disease management: the case of Lyme disease and countryside users'. ROYAL SOC Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, 366 (1573), pp. 2010-2022.

    Abstract

    Management of zoonotic disease is necessary if countryside users are to gain benefit rather than suffer harm from their activities, and to avoid disproportionate reaction to novel threats. We introduce a conceptual framework based on the pressure–state–response model with five broad responses to disease incidence. Influencing public behaviour is one response and requires risk communication based on an integration of knowledge about the disease with an understanding of how publics respond to precautionary advice. A second framework emphasizes how risk communication involves more than information provision and should address dimensions including points-of-intervention over time, place and audience. The frameworks are developed by reference to tick-borne Lyme borreliosis (also known as Lyme disease), for which informed precautionary behaviour is particularly relevant. Interventions to influence behaviour can be directed by knowledge of spatial and temporal variation of tick abundance, what constitutes risky behaviour, how people respond to information of varying content, and an understanding of the social practices related to countryside use. The frameworks clarify the response options and help identify who is responsible for risk communication. These aspects are not consistently understood, and may result in an underestimation of the role of land-based organizations in facilitating appropriate precautionary behaviour.

  • Nigbur D, Lyons E, Uzzell D. (2010) 'Attitudes, norms, identity and environmental behaviour: Using an expanded theory of planned behaviour to predict participation in a kerbside recycling programme'. British Psychologicla Society British Journal of Social Psychology, 49 (2), pp. 259-284.
  • Rathzel N, Uzzell D. (2009) 'Changing relations in global environmental change'. ELSEVIER SCI LTD Global Environmental Change, 19 (3), pp. 326-335.

Journal articles

  • Murtagh N, Gatersleben B, Uzzell D. (2014) '20∶60∶20 - Differences in Energy Behaviour and Conservation between and within Households with Electricity Monitors'. Public Library of Science PLoS One, 9 (3)

    Abstract

    The introduction of electricity monitors (in-home displays; IHDs), which show accurate and up-to-the-minute energy usage, is expected to lead to reduction in consumption. Studies of feedback on domestic electricity use have generally supported this view. However, such studies also demonstrate wide variation between households. Examining the heterogeneity of responses is essential for understanding the actual and potential effectiveness of IHDs and in order to target interventions effectively. To explore differences between households’ responses to IHDs, we conducted a qualitative study with 21 households who had an IHD for more than six months. Of the 21, only four households continued to refer to the IHD and the findings suggest that attempts to reduce energy consumption were situated in wider social and physical contexts. Further, the participants demonstrated energy saving behaviour before and outside of IHD usage. The patterns of energy behaviours and attempts at electricity conservation could best be understood by categorising the households into three types: the Monitor Enthusiasts (20%), the Aspiring Energy Savers (60%) and the Energy Non-Engaged (20%). The factors of importance in energy behaviour differed between the categories. Financial savings contributed to efforts to reduce energy use but only up to boundaries which varied considerably between households. Social practices and social relationships appeared to constrain what actions households were prepared to undertake, illuminating aspects of inter-household variation. Within the household, all energy users were not equal and we found that women were particularly influential on energy use through their primary responsibility for domestic labour on behalf of the household. The implications of the findings for environmental campaigning are discussed. The research was funded by the Digital Economy Programme of the Research Councils UK, a cross-council initiative led by EPSRC (www.epsrc.ac.uk) and contributed to by AHRC, ESRC and MRC, under the REDUCE project grant (no EP/I000232/1). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish or preparation of the manuscript.

  • Acuña-Rivera M, Uzzell D, Brown J. (2014) 'The mediating role of risk perception in neighbourhood disorder and perceptions of safety about victimization'. Elsevier Journal of Environmental Psychology,
  • Murtagh N, Nati M, Headley WR, Gatersleben B, Gluhak A, Imran MA, Uzzell D. (2013) 'Individual energy use and feedback in an office setting: A field trial'. Elsevier Energy Policy, 62, pp. 717-728.

    Abstract

    Despite national plans to deploy smart meters in small and medium businesses in the UK, there is little knowledge of occupant energy use in offices. The objectives of the study were to investigate the effect of individual feedback on energy use at the workdesk, and to test the relationship between individual determinants, energy use and energy reduction. A field trial is presented, which monitored occupant energy use and provided individual feedback to 83 office workers in a university. The trial comprised pre- and post-intervention surveys, energy measurement and provision of feedback for 18 weeks post-baseline, and two participant focus groups. The main findings were: statistically significant energy reduction was found, but not for the entire measurement period; engagement with feedback diminished over time; no measured individual variables were related to energy reduction and only attitudes to energy conservation were related to energy use; an absence of motivation to undertake energy reduction actions was in evidence. The implications for energy use in offices are considered, including the need for motivations beyond energy reduction to be harnessed to realise the clear potential for reduced energy use at workdesks. © 2013 The Authors.

  • Marcu A, Barnett J, Uzzell D, Vasileiou K, O'Connell S. (2013) 'Experience of Lyme disease and preferences for precautions: a cross-sectional survey of UK patients'. BMC Public Health, 13
  • Räthzel N, Uzzell D. (2012) 'How to protect jobs as well as the environment? Trade union’s environmental policies'. Arbetarhistoria, 143, pp. 19-23.
  • Räthzel N, Uzzell D. (2012) 'Mending the breach between labour and nature: environmental engagements of trade unions and the North-South divide'. Interface: a journal for and about social movements, 4 (2), pp. 81-100.
  • Spinney J, Burningham KA, Cooper G, Green N, Uzzell D. (2012) ''What I've found is that your related experiences tend to make you dissatisfied': Psychological obsolescence, consumer demand and the dynamics and environmental implications of de-stabilisation in the laptop sector’'. Sage Journal of Consumer Culture, 12 (3), pp. 347-370.

    Abstract

    Research on product life-spans tends to link the causes of psychological obsolescence with end-users and product designers, and posits the consequences of obsolescence in terms of increasing e-waste and energy use. Drawing upon qualitative fieldwork conducted with employees of a global computer firm and users of its laptop computers this article brings together the poles of production and consumption to explore the dynamics of de-stabilization in product qualities, connecting the intensification of this process to psychological obsolescence and unsustainable patterns of consumption. First, we demonstrate that consumer-facing functions within the firm such as user research, sales and marketing play a key role in driving the pace of technological change within the firm by specifying consumer demand. We argue that by distilling an imaginary demanding consumer from various sources, the firm justifies and drives rapid de-stabilization in product qualities and specifications. We show how this prompts end consumers to constantly re-evaluate product qualities, devaluing existing products and contributing to psychological obsolescence and disposal of functioning products. We then go on to discuss the environmental implications of this process, suggesting that whilst premature disposal due to perceived obsolescence may not increase waste in the short term, it is still likely to contribute to an increase in material and energy use in manufacturing.

  • Murtagh N, Gatersleben B, Uzzell D. (2012) 'Multiple identities and travel mode choice for regular journeys'. Elsevier Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 15 (5), pp. 514-524.

    Abstract

    Growing evidence supports a range of non-instrumental factors influencing travel mode. Amongst these, identity has been proposed. However, to date, the relationship has not been systematically investigated and few investigations have harnessed a theoretical framework for identity. Drawing on role theory (Stryker, S., 1980, Symbolic interactionism: A social structural version. CA: Benjamin Cummings), we hypothesised that multiple identities, of varying importance, are related to travel mode choice. The study of 248 UK urban/suburban, working, car-owning parents used survey-based data to test the influence of seven identities on travel mode choice in regular travel. Multiple and logistic regression analyses found multiple identities to be significantly related to travel mode to work, on escort education and on other regular journeys. The study demonstrated different patterns of relationship between identity on different types of journey and found evidence for travel mode choice as embedded within social identities. In addition to the study‟s contribution of new empirical findings, its application of a theoretical focus on identity offers additional strategies in attempting to change travel behaviours towards sustainability.

  • Murtagh N, Gatersleben B, Uzzell D. (2012) 'Self-identity Threat and Resistance to Change: Evidence from Regular Travel Behaviour'. Elsevier Journal of Environmental Psychology, 32 (4), pp. 318-326.

    Abstract

    Despite widespread acceptance of the need to change individual behaviour towards sustainability, resistance to change remains a continuing challenge. Past behaviour or habit, and psychological reactance, have been explored as components of resistance. Growing evidence for the influence of self-identity on behaviour suggests self-identity as a further factor. The current study draws on Identity Process Theory (Breakwell, 1986) to propose that threat to self-identity contributes to resistance to change, over and above the influence of past behaviour. Using travel-related vignettes to trigger threat, a study with 295 working parents in England found evidence supporting the relationship between self-identity threat and resistance to change travel behaviour, controlling for past behaviour. The findings further suggest identity threat as an alternative theoretical perspective on reactance. The results build theoretical understanding of resistance as a barrier to behaviour change. The application of an identity theory to understanding resistance is argued to add potentially new ways to encourage change towards sustainable behaviour. In addition, the findings suggest rich avenues for future research on the theoretical and empirical implications of the relationship of identities and sustainable behaviours.

  • Uzzell D, Vasileiou K, Marcu A, Barnett J. (2012) 'Whose Lyme is it anyway? Subject Positions and the Construction of Responsibility for Managing the Health Risk of Lyme Disease'. Health and Place, 18 (5), pp. 1101-1109.
  • Spinney J, Green N, Burningham K, Cooper G, Uzzell D. (2012) ''Are we sitting comfortably? Domestic imaginaries, laptop practices, and energy use''. Pion Environment and Planning A: international journal of urban and regional research, 44 (11), pp. 2629-2645.

    Abstract

    The considerable literature on domestic energy consumption practices has tended to focus on either the (re)production and contestation of normative imaginaries, or the links between escalating standards and energy use. Far less has been written which links these related areas together. Accordingly, this paper is positioned at the intersection of debates on domestic consumption, energy use, and home cultures. Through a qualitative study of laptop use in the home, we illustrate how energy-intensive practices, such as ‘always-on-ness’, and changing computer ecologies and infrastructures, are intimately bound up with the reproduction of particular domestic imaginaries of family and home. A key insight in this paper is that a purely physiological conception of comfort would fail to explain fully why practices such as always-on-ness emerge, and thus we theorise comfort as an accomplishment comprised of inseparable temporal, bodily, spatial, and material elements. Ultimately, we argue here that comfort needs to be understood as a multivalent imaginary that is itself bound up in broader idealised notions of family and home in order to comprehend shifting practices, computing ecologies, and rising energy consumption.

  • O'Brien L, Marcu A, Marzano M, Barnett J, Quine C, Uzzell D. (2012) 'Situating risk in the context of a woodland visit: a case study on Lyme Borreliosis'. Scottish Forestry, 66 (4), pp. 14-24.
  • Räthzel N, Uzzell D. (2011) 'Natur oder Arbeit? Dilemata und Perspektiven Gewerkschaftlicher Umweltpolitik'. Berlin Institute of Critical Theory Das Argument (The argument: Journal of Philosophy & Social Sciences), 294 (5), pp. 734-744.

    Abstract

    The article discusses the ways in which international trade unions are conceptualising the relationship between jobs and the environment. On the basis of interviews with union representatives, four such ways are discerned: »technological fi x«, »transformation of social identities«, »rearticulation of immediate interests« and »engagement for general interests«. All four ways of reasoning imply a re-invention of unions as social movements but reduce nature to an environment providing the conditions for human health/illness. The authors argue that Marx’ notion of labour and nature as the two sources of wealth and of work as the process in which humans develop their capabilities can provide a point of departure for unions to conceptualise production as a process in which nature and labour form an alliance. This implies challenging the private appropriation of nature.

  • Räthzel N, Uzzell D. (2011) 'Trade Unions and Climate Change: The Jobs versus Environment Dilemma'. Elsevier Global Environmental Change Part A, 21 (4), pp. 1215-1223.

    Abstract

    Trade unions are actively engaging with the climate change agenda and formulating climate change policies. Although governments are placing considerable effort on changing consumer behaviour, arguably the most significant impacts on climate change will be through changes in production. Even changes in consumption will have consequences for production. Changes in production will affect workers through the loss of jobs, the changing of jobs, and the creation of new jobs. The jobs versus environment dilemma is a significant issue affecting workers worldwide. In this paper we focus on the ways in which international trade unions are conceptualising the relationship between jobs and the environment, which provide the point of departure from which climate change policies can be formulated. Extended interviews were conducted with senior policy makers in national and international trade unions. On the basis of their responses, four discourses of trade union engagement with climate change are discussed: ‘technological fix’, ‘social transformation’, ‘mutual interests’ and ‘social movement’ discourses, which were theorised in the context of the different international histories and models of trade unionism. All discourses imply a re-invention of unions as social movements but do not see nature as a partner in human development.

  • Uzzell D. (2011) 'Obituary: Gabriel Moser 24 March 1944–21 April 2011'. Elsevier Journal of Environmental Psychology, 31 (3), pp. 272-273.
  • Quine CP, Barnett J, Dobson ADM, Marcu A, Marzano M, Moseley D, O'Brien L, Randolph SE, Taylor JL, Uzzell D. (2011) 'Frameworks for risk communication and disease management: the case of Lyme disease and countryside users'. ROYAL SOC Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, 366 (1573), pp. 2010-2022.

    Abstract

    Management of zoonotic disease is necessary if countryside users are to gain benefit rather than suffer harm from their activities, and to avoid disproportionate reaction to novel threats. We introduce a conceptual framework based on the pressure–state–response model with five broad responses to disease incidence. Influencing public behaviour is one response and requires risk communication based on an integration of knowledge about the disease with an understanding of how publics respond to precautionary advice. A second framework emphasizes how risk communication involves more than information provision and should address dimensions including points-of-intervention over time, place and audience. The frameworks are developed by reference to tick-borne Lyme borreliosis (also known as Lyme disease), for which informed precautionary behaviour is particularly relevant. Interventions to influence behaviour can be directed by knowledge of spatial and temporal variation of tick abundance, what constitutes risky behaviour, how people respond to information of varying content, and an understanding of the social practices related to countryside use. The frameworks clarify the response options and help identify who is responsible for risk communication. These aspects are not consistently understood, and may result in an underestimation of the role of land-based organizations in facilitating appropriate precautionary behaviour.

  • Durrant A, Frohlich DM, Sellen A, Uzzell D. (2011) 'The secret life of teens: online versus offline photographic displays at home'. Taylor & Francis Visual Studies, 26 (2), pp. 113-124.

    Abstract

    In this article we describe findings from a recent study in which we interviewed four British teenage girls about their photo display practices, online and offline, in family homes. We adopted a phenomenological approach to inquiry, with a particular interest in exploring how photographic representations of self and family signal self-development in emerging adulthood. Findings reveal how teens portrayed themselves differently to friends, online, and family, offline. Self-presentation to peers through photographs was managed separately from the family and largely free from parental control. The separate, online domain was used to explore alternative self-representations with real friends. Our findings appear to signal changing politics of photograph ownership and family representation between the generations.

  • Marcu A, Uzzell D, Barnett J. (2011) 'Making sense of unfamiliar risks in the countryside: The case of Lyme disease'. Elsevier Health and Place, 17 (3), pp. 843-850.

    Abstract

    The focus of this paper is on how popular representations of the countryside provide countryside users with a discursive framework to make sense of unfamiliar countryside-based risks, taking Lyme disease as an example. Sixty-six semi-structured interviews were conducted with 82 visitors in Richmond Park, New Forest, and Exmoor National Park in the UK. The data were analysed using thematic analysis and was informed by social representations theory. The analysis indicated that a lay understanding of the risk of Lyme disease was filtered by place-attachment and the social representations of the countryside. Lyme disease was not understood primarily as a risk to health, but was instead constructed as a risk to the social and restorative practices in the context of the countryside. The findings suggest that advice about zoonoses such as Lyme disease is unlikely to cause panic, and that it should focus on the least intrusive preventative measures.

  • Acuña-Rivera M, Uzzell D, Brown J. (2011) 'Percepción de desorden, riesgo y seguridad: La influencia del método'. Fundacion Infancia y Aprendizaje Psyecology, Spain: 2 (2), pp. 115-126.

    Abstract

    De acuerdo con varios estudios, la evaluación de incivilidades físicas y sociales de los lugares forma parte del proceso mediante el cual la gente estima su nivel de seguridad. El estudio que aquí se presenta investiga si tal supuesto se mantiene cuando a la gente se le permite expresar lo que piensa de un lugar antes de evaluar el nivel de desorden físico y social del mismo. En primer lugar, los participantes debían escribir sus impresiones sobre tres vecindarios con distintos niveles de desorden, y después evaluar mediante un cuestionario que tan desordenados e inseguros les parecían. El análisis cualitativo mostró que aun cuando los participantes mencionaron el desorden físico del lugar, sólo algunos de ellos hicieron referencia a cuestiones de crimen e inseguridad. El análisis cuantitativo reveló que mientras mas desordenado se evaluaba un lugar mayor inseguridad se percibía. Las conclusiones sugieren que, por un lado, la percepción de desorden de un lugar no siempre evoca respuestas de inseguridad y, por el otro, que la relación encontrada entre desorden e inseguridad puede deberse al método de investigación utilizado.

  • Acuña-Rivera M, Uzzell D, Brown J. (2011) 'Perceptions of disorder, risk and safety: The method and framing effects'. Fundación Infancia y Aprendizaje Psyecology: Revista Bilingüe de Psicología Ambiental - Bilingual Journal of Environmental Psychology, 2 (2), pp. 167-177.

    Abstract

    Several research studies have argued that people evaluate incivilities of places as part of the process of estimating how safe they might be. The study presented here examined whether such an assumption is upheld when people are allowed to express their thoughts about places before rating how disordered a place seems to them. British students evaluated three residential areas with different levels of disorder. First, participants had to write their impressions about the places and then rate how disordered, risky and unsafe the places seemed to them. The qualitative analysis showed that despite participants referred to physical disorder, only few participants mentioned crime and safety. Results from the quantitative analysis revealed that as the more disordered a place was rated the more unsafe it was considered. Findings suggest both that disordered places not always elicit unsafe concerns and that the so predicted relationship between disorder and safety maybe method dependant.

  • Pepper M, Jackson T, Uzzell D. (2011) 'An Examination of Christianity and Socially Conscious and Frugal Consumer behaviors'. Sage Publications Environment and Behavior, 43 (2), pp. 274-290.
  • Ballantyne R, Uzzell D. (2011) 'Looking back – looking forward: the rise of the visitor-centred museum'. Wiley-Blackwell Curator: The Museum Journal, 54 (1), pp. 85-92.
  • Räthzel N, Uzzell D, Elliott D. (2010) 'Can trade unions become environmental innovators?'. Lawrence and Wishart Soundings: A journal of Politics and Culture, 46, pp. 76-87.

    Abstract

    Lessons can be learned from the actions of the workers and shop stewards at Lucas Aerospace in the 1970s, who fought redundancies by developing a plan for alternative production to turn swords into ploughshares - to transform Lucas Aerospace from a company producing aeronautical and military systems to a company producing socially-useful products. The Lucas Alternative Plan failed for a variety of reasons, but the idea that workers can put forward alternative proposals for sustainable development - for a just transition - are suggestive of new ways for unions to participate in combating climate change. Recent developments of trade union policies towards climate change are discussed, with possible answers offered to some of the conflicts with which unions struggle in their attempt to garner more widespread support for their ambitious environmental policies.

  • Uzzell D. (2010) 'Collective solutions to a global problem'. The Psychologist, 23 (11)
  • Uzzell D. (2010) 'Psychology and climate change: collective solutions to a global problem'. British Academy British Academy Review, 16, pp. 15-16.

    Abstract

    On 23 September 2010, in his Joint British Academy/British Psychological Society Lecture, Professor David Uzzell argued that behaviour-change approaches to climate change need to take account of the societal context that gives rise to the values and attitudes that drive our behaviours. As consumers, our preferences and actions – and as a consequence our greenhouse gas emissions and the impact we have on the environment – are shaped by the products and oppor tunities we are offered, which create new desires and preferences. In the following extract, Professor Uzzell looks at the societal forces influencing our practices and identities as workers.

  • Uzzell D. (2010) 'Carl Graumann and the “Ecologization” of Psychology'. International Association for People-Environment Studies Bulletin of the International Association of People-Environment Studies, 36, pp. 2-3.
  • Nigbur D, Lyons E, Uzzell D. (2010) 'Attitudes, norms, identity and environmental behaviour: Using an expanded theory of planned behaviour to predict participation in a kerbside recycling programme'. British Psychologicla Society British Journal of Social Psychology, 49 (2), pp. 259-284.
  • Pepper M, Jackson T, Uzzell D. (2010) 'A Study of Multidimensional Religion Constructs and Values in the United Kingdom'. WILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 49 (1), pp. 127-146.
  • Uzzell D. (2010) 'A special introduction'. Journal of Asian Behavioural Studies, 1 (1), pp. 1-5.
  • Gatersleben B, White E, Abrahamse W, Jackson T, Uzzell D. (2010) 'Values and sustainable lifestyles'. Routledge, Taylor & Francis Architectural Science Review, 53 (1), pp. 37-50.
  • Uzzell D, Rathzel N. (2009) 'Transforming environmental psychology'. ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY, 29 (3), pp. 340-350.
  • Uzzell D, Moser G. (2009) 'Introduction: Environmental psychology on the move'. ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY, 29 (3), pp. 307-308.
  • Rathzel N, Uzzell D. (2009) 'Changing relations in global environmental change'. ELSEVIER SCI LTD Global Environmental Change, 19 (3), pp. 326-335.
  • Pepper M, Jackson T, Uzzell D. (2009) 'An examination of the values that motivate socially conscious and frugal consumer behaviours'. WILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CONSUMER STUDIES, 33 (2), pp. 126-136.
  • Gifford R, Scannell L, Kormos C, Smolova L, Biel A, Boncu S, Corral V, Guentherf H, Hanyu K, Hine D, Kaiser FG, Korpela K, Lima LM, Mertig AG, Garcia Mira R, Moser G, Passafaro P, Pinheiro JQ, Saini S, Sako T, Sautkina E, Savina Y, Schmuck P, Schultz W, Sobeck K, Sundblad E-L, Uzzell D. (2009) 'Temporal pessimism and spatial optimism in environmental assessments: An 18-nation study'. ACADEMIC PRESS LTD- ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY, 29 (1), pp. 1-12.
  • Spence A, Pidgeon N, Uzzell D. (2009) 'Climate Change: Sparking off Debate about the Hot Topic'. The Psychologist, 22 (2), pp. 118-121.
  • Uzzell D. (2009) 'Review of Pablo Páramo "El Significado de los lugares públicos para la gente de Bogotá (The significance of public places for the people of Bogota). Fondo Editorial Universidad Pedagógica Nacional. 165 pp. 2007. ISBN 9789588316284'. FOUNDATION ADVANCEMENT PSYCHOLOGY REVISTA LATINOAMERICANA DE PSICOLOGIA, 41 (1), pp. 154-155.
  • Raethzel N, Uzzell D. (2009) 'Transformative environmental education: a collective rehearsal for reality'. ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION RESEARCH, 15 (3), pp. 263-277.
  • Pepper M, Jackson T, Uzzell D. (2009) 'An examination of the values that motivate socially conscious and frugal consumer behaviours'. International Journal of Consumer Studies, 33 (2), pp. 126-136.
  • Uzzell D. (2008) 'People-environment relationships in a digital world'. LOCKE SCIENCE PUBL CO INC JOURNAL OF ARCHITECTURAL AND PLANNING RESEARCH, 25 (2), pp. 94-105.
  • Uzzell D. (2008) 'Challenging Assumptions in the Psychology of Climate Change'. InPsych, Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society, 30 (4), pp. 10-13.
  • Gatersleben B, Clark C, Reeve A, Uzzell D. (2007) 'The impact of a new transport link on residential communities'. ACADEMIC PRESS LTD ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY, 27 (2), pp. 145-153.
  • Gatersleben B, Uzzell D. (2007) 'Affective appraisals of the daily commute - Comparing perceptions of drivers, cyclists, walkers, and users of public transport'. SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC ENVIRONMENT AND BEHAVIOR, 39 (3), pp. 416-431.
  • Bonnes M, Uzzell D, Carrus G, Kelay T. (2007) 'Inhabitants' and experts' assessments of environmental quality for urban sustainability'. BLACKWELL PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF SOCIAL ISSUES, 63 (1), pp. 59-78.
  • Uzzell D, Brown J. (2007) 'Conceptual progress in understanding fear of crime in railway stations'. Psicologia, 21 (2), pp. 119-137.
  • Uzzell D, Horne N. (2006) 'The influence of biological sex, sexuality and gender role on interpersonal distance.'. Br J Soc Psychol, England: 45 (Pt 3), pp. 579-597.

    Abstract

    This research reports on a conceptually and methodologically innovative study, which sought to measure the influence of gender on interpersonal distance. In so doing, we argue for an important distinction to be made between biological sex, gender role, and sexuality. To date, however, progress in the study of interpersonal distance (IPD) has been inhibited by poor operational definitions and inadequate measurement methodologies. For our own investigation, we innovated on methodology by devising the digital video-recording IPD method (DiVRID) that records interpersonal spatial relationships using high quality digital video equipment. The findings highlighted not only the validity of our innovative method of investigation, but also that a more sophisticated conceptualization of the impact of gender on IPD is warranted than can be accounted for by biological sex differences. In this study, we found that gender role accounts for more of the variation in IPD than the conventionally reported gender variable, sex.

  • Uzzell D, Moser G. (2006) 'Environment and quality of life'. ELSEVIER FRANCE-EDITIONS SCIENTIFIQUES MEDICALES ELSEVIER EUROPEAN REVIEW OF APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY-REVUE EUROPEENNE DE PSYCHOLOGIE APPLIQUEE, 56 (1), pp. 1-4.
  • Meader N, Uzzell D, Gatersleben B. (2006) 'Cultural theory and quality of life'. ELSEVIER FRANCE-EDITIONS SCIENTIFIQUES MEDICALES ELSEVIER EUROPEAN REVIEW OF APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY-REVUE EUROPEENNE DE PSYCHOLOGIE APPLIQUEE, 56 (1), pp. 61-69.
  • García-Mira R, Real JE, Uzzell DL, San Juan C, Pol E. (2006) 'Coping with a threat to quality of life: The case of the Prestige disaster'. Revue Europeene de Psychologie Appliquee, 56 (1), pp. 53-60.
  • Uzzell D, Muckle R. (2005) 'Simulating traffic engineering solutions to predict changes in driving behaviour'. Transportation Research Part F-Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 8 (4-5), pp. 311-329.
  • Uzzell DL. (2005) 'Questioning Methods in Interdisciplinary Environmental Psychology Research and Practice'. Psicologia USP, 16 (1/2), pp. 185-199.
  • Uzzell DL, Moser G, Rabinovich EP, Ornstein SW. (2005) 'Psicologia E Ambiente: O Papel Da Psicologia Ambiental No Estudo Das Questões Ambientais'. Psicologia USP, 16 (1/2), pp. 15-17.
  • Romice O, Uzzell D. (2005) 'Community Design Studio: a Collaboration of Architects and Psychologists'. CEBE Transactions, 2 (1), pp. 73-88.
  • Ravenscroft N, Uzzell D, Leach R. (2002) 'Danger ahead? The impact of fear of crime on people's recreational use of nonmotorised shared-use routes'. Environment and Planning C-Government and Policy, 20 (5), pp. 741-756.
  • Uzzell D, Pol E, Badenas D. (2002) 'Place identification, social cohesion, and environmental sustainability'. Sage Environment and Behavior, 34 (1), pp. 26-53.
  • Clark C, Uzzell DL. (2002) 'The affordances of the home, neighbourhood, school and town centre for adolescents'. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 22 (1-2), pp. 95-108.
  • Uzzell DL. (2000) 'The psycho-spatial dimension of global environmental problems'. Elsevier Journal of Environmental Psychology, 20 (4), pp. 307-318.
  • Uzzell D, Jones E. (2000) 'The development of a process-based methodology for assessing the visual impact of buildings'. Journal of Architectural and Planning Research, 17 (4), pp. 330-343.
  • Twigger-Ross C, Uzzell D. (1996) 'Place identity and place attachment'. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 16 (2), pp. 205-220.

Conference papers

  • Uzzell D. (2012) 'History, Collective Memory and Memorializing the Past'. University of Queensland, Brisbane: Interpreting our Heritage and Understanding our Visitors
  • Räthzel N, Uzzell D. (2011) 'Trade Unions facing the dual challenge of globalising work division and globalising environmental degradation'. University of Leeds: International Labour Process Conference
  • Rathzel N, Uzzell D. (2011) 'Environmental Labour Studies: tackling the job-environment, north-south contradictions'. University of Leeds: International Labour Process Conference
  • Räthzel N, Uzzell D. (2010) 'Responses to environmental degradation: an opportunity for a new social movement unionism in the North and South'. University of Cape Town, South Africa: New Trends In Labour Studies: New Workplaces, Communities And Livelihoods
  • Uzzell D. (2010) 'Psychology and Climate Change: Collective Solutions to a Global Problem'. Royal Society, London: Joint British Academy/British Psychological Society Annual Lecture 2010
  • Uzzell D, Räthzel N. (2010) 'Social approaches to the problem of climate change: The role of trade unions'. La Coruna, Spain: Sustainability and Climate Change: Advances on Social Sciences Research
  • Murtagh N, Gatersleben B, Uzzell D. (2010) 'Identity threat and resistance to change transport-related behaviour'. BPS Social Psychology Section The University of Winchester, UK: BPS Social Psychology Section Annual Conference 2010.Social Psychology in Action: Theoretical Debate and Social Impact
  • Räthzel N, Uzzell D. (2010) 'Trade Unions Facing Globalising Work Division and Environmental Degradation'. Göteborg, Sweden: XVII ISA World Congress of Sociology: Sociology on the move
  • Uzzell D. (2010) 'Trade unions and climate change'. Belgium : ILO-ITUC-GURN Report: Trade Unions and Climate Change. Conference News No. 1, Brussels, Belgium: ITUC/GURN Workshop on Climate Change: Its Impacts on Employment and Labour Markets
  • Marcu A, Barnett J, Uzzell D. (2010) 'Information sufficiency and the timing of precautions: the case of Lyme disease'. London: 19th meeting of the Society for Risk Analysis
  • Uzzell D. (2010) 'Sustainable Development and Urban Health: An Environmental Psychology Perspective'. Hinxton, Cambridge: Wellcome Trust Frontiers Meeting on Built Environment: How can we maximise health?
  • Marcu A, Uzzell D, Barnett J. (2010) 'Denial of risk in a restorative environment: The case of Lyme disease'. Forestry Commission Heriot Watt University, Edinburgh: Trees and Forests in British Society
  • Uzzell D. (2010) 'Discussant to Seminar on Behaviour Change'. London: House of Lords Select Committee on Science and Technology
  • Uzzell D. (2010) 'How Can Psychology Contribute to the Sustainable Workplace?'. London: BPS Occupational Psychology Section Conference. Going Green in the Workplace.
  • Uzzell D. (2010) 'La Sostenibilitat vista per empreses i sindicats del Nord i del Sud'. Barcelona: Research Network in Education for Sustainability conference "Strategy and change. Skills for Sustainability in business."
  • Uzzell D, Gatersleben B, White E. (2010) 'Using life history interviews to examine outdoor experiences and behaviours'. IAPS Leipzig: IAPS21, International Association of People-Environment Studies
  • Uzzell D. (2009) 'The Futility of Resistance: Changing Attitudes to Waste'. London: London Technology Network (LTN) conference on Value from Waste: Generating Sustainable Bi-Products from Waste for Re-use
  • Uzzell D, Marcu A, Barnett J. (2009) 'Managing Risks in a Restorative Environment'. Pabst Science Publishers Zurich: 8th Biennial Conference on Environmental Psychology
  • Räthzel N, Uzzell D. (2009) 'A Collective Response to Climate Change: the Role of Trade Unions'. Pabst Science Publishers Zurich: 8th Biennial Conference on Environmental Psychology
  • White E, Uzzell D. (2009) 'Using the life history approach to examine food practices and meanings'. Pabst Science Publishers Zurich: 8th Biennial Conference on Environmental Psychology
  • Marcu A, Barnett J, Brodzinska M, Uzzell D. (2009) 'Risk perceptions of zoonoses in text vs. images: The impact of the social representations of animals'. ESA Lisbon: 9th European Sociological Association Conference
  • Durrant A, Taylor AS, Frohlich DM, Sellen A, Uzzell D. (2009) 'Photo Displays and Intergenerational Relationships in the Family Home'. The British Computer Society HCI 2009 – People and Computers XXIII – Celebrating people and technology, Cambridge, UK.: The 23rd BCS conference on Human Computer Interaction (HCI), pp. 10-19.

    Abstract

    In this paper we describe a design-orientated field study in which we deploy a novel digital display device to explore the potential integration of teenage and family photo displays at home, as well as the value of situated photo display technologies for intergenerational expression. This exploration is deemed timely given the contemporary take-up of digital capture devices by teenagers and the unprecedented volume of photographic content that teens generate. Findings support integration and the display of photos on a standalone device, as well as demonstrating the interventional efficacy of the design as a resource for provoking reflection on the research subject. We also draw upon the theoretical concept of Dialogism to understand how our design mediates intergenerational relationships and interaction aesthetics relating to the notion of ‘constructive conflict’.

  • Marcu A, Barnett J, Brodzinska M, Uzzell D. (2009) 'Perceptions of risk from animals in text vs. images: A multiple sorting procedure approach'. Karlstad, Sweden: 18th meeting of the Society for Risk Analysis
  • Uzzell D. (2009) 'When and Where Memory and History Meet'. Gernika-Lumo, Spain: 19th International Convention on Culture and Peace
  • Uzzell D. (2009) 'Critical Issues in the Psychology of Behaviour Change for Climate Change'. IOP Publishing IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen/International Alliance of Research Universities, Copenhagen, Denmark: Climate Change: Global Risks, Challenges and Decisions 6
  • Uzzell D. (2009) 'How people use and misuse buildings: Introductory comments'. Royal Institute of British Architecture, London, UK: ESRC/TSB Public policy seminar on ‘How people use and misuse buildings'
  • Uzzell D. (2008) 'Human Behavior and Climate Change: A Social Justice Issue'. APA Psychology International Newsletter, United Nations Headquarters, New York: Second Annual United Nations Psychology Day: Psychology and Social Justice Related to the UN Global Agenda 5 (19)
  • Uzzell D. (2008) 'The challenge of climate change; the challenge for psychology'. APS Hobart, Tasmania: 43 Australian Psychological Association Annual Conference
  • Räthzel N, Uzzell D. (2008) 'Changing Relations in Global Environmental Change'. Barcelona, Spain: First ISA Forum of Sociology, Sociological Research and Public Debate
  • Uzzell D. (2008) 'Challenging Issues for the Psychology of Climate Change'. APA Boston, USA: Presidential Symposium on Psychological Research to Meet the Global Challenges of Climate Change and Sustainable Development: An International Symposium, 116th American Psychological Association Annual Convention
  • Uzzell D, Räthzel N, Lumsden D. (2008) 'The Importance of Context in the Interpretation of Cross-Cultural Environmental Attitudes'. IAPS IAPS 20 Conference Proceedings: URBAN DIVERSITIES, BIOSPHERE AND WELL-BEING: DESIGNING AND MANAGING OUR COMMON ENVIRONMENT, Rome, Italy: International Association for People-Environment Studies Conference on "Urban diversities, biosphere and well-being"
  • Acuña-Rivera M, Uzzell D, Brown J. (2008) 'Disorder and perceived risk: their influence in perceived safety'. IAPS Rome: 20 International Association for People-Environment Studies Conference on "Urban diversities, biosphere and well-being"
  • Uzzell D. (2008) 'The “Ecologization” of Psychology”: Carl Graumann as an Influential Figure in Environmental Psychology'. Rome, Italy: 2008 IAPS Conference: "Urban diversities, biosphere and well-being"
  • Uzzell D. (2008) 'Changing Climate, Changing Lifestyles, Changing Psychology'. Hotel Eurostars-Palace, La Coruña: Sostibilidade e Cultura Ambiental en Galicia
  • Uzzell D. (2008) 'Changing Climate, Changing Lifestyles, Changing Psychology'. La Coruna, Spain: Sostibilidade e Cultura Ambiental en Galicia
  • Uzzell D, Räthzel N. (2008) 'Changing Relations in Global Environmental Change'. Berlin: Long Term Policies: Governing Social-Ecological Change, Conference on the Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Change)
  • Uzzell D. (2007) 'Critical Comments for Critical Times: Questioning Psychology’s Contribution to a Sustainable Society'. University of La Coruña: Sostibilidade, Valores e Medio Ambiente
  • Stancioiu O, Speller G, Uzzell D. (2007) 'Public space: everybody's, nobody's or mine? A case study of Mănăştur, Cluj in post-communist Romania'. Silesian University of Technology, Poland: International Scientific Symposium Housing And Environmental Conditions In Post-Communist Countries
  • Uzzell D. (2007) 'Critical Perspectives on the Psychology of Sustainability'. University of Paris X-Nanterre: Problems of the Environment and the Consequences of Climate Change
  • Uzzell D. (2007) 'How to Succeed? Factors to Consider When Encouraging Behaviour Change'. Solna stadshus, Solna, Sweden: Ändra Ditt Beteende För Miljöns Bästa
  • Uzzell D, Räthzel N. (2007) 'Transformative sustainability, transforming policy research'. Bayreuth: 7th biennial conference on Environmental Psychology, German Association of Psychology
  • Uzzell D, Räthzel N. (2007) 'Scrutinizing the bill: the need for transformative environmental education'. Durban, South Africa: 4th World Environmental Education Congress
  • Uzzell D. (2007) 'Environmental Psychology for a Sustainable City'. St Edmund Hall, Oxford University: Sustainable Cities: Ecological-Economic and Environmental Psychological Aspects of Urban Design and Management
  • Uzzell D. (2006) 'Conflict on the route to sustainable development'. Lund, Sweden: Swedish Environmental Psychology Association
  • Uzzell D, Jackson T, Pepper M. (2006) 'Environmentalism in churches: attitudes and behaviours of UK Christians'. Woodbrooke Study Centre, Birmingham: Critical Perspectives on Religion and the EnvironmentConference
  • Uzzell D. (2006) 'The Impact of Environmental Psychology and IAPS'. Alexandria, Egypt: 19th International Conference IAPS
  • Nigbur D, Uzzell D, Lyons E. (2006) 'Increasing Recycling Through Community Action'. Alexandria, Egypt: 19th International Conference of the international Association for People-Environment Studies
  • Michels R, Uzzell D, Singh T. (2006) 'A Co-orientational Approach to Understanding Perceptions of Water Scarcity in Bhopal, India'. Alexandria, Egypt: 19th International Conference of the international Association for People-Environment Studies
  • Uzzell D, Muckle R. (2006) 'Changing washroom behaviour'. 19th International Conference of the international Association for People-Environment Studies
  • Uzzell D. (2006) 'Behaviour Change and Sustainable Development'. Council for Environmental Education, London: Changing Times: Opportunities, Challenges and Ways Forward for Education for Sustainable Development
  • Uzzell D. (2006) 'Behavior change and sustainable development'. Central Halls Westminster, London: Changing Times: Opportunities, Challenges and Ways Forward for Education for Sustainable Development
  • Pepper M, Jackson T, Uzzell D. (2006) 'Christianity and Consumerism: Views from the Pews'. London Metropolitan University: ISET International Conference on Countering Consumerism: Religious and Secular Responses
  • Pepper M, Jackson T, Uzzell D. (2006) 'Christianity and Sustainable Consumption: An Investigation of Religiosity and Consumer Behaviours'. University of Manchester: BSA Sociology of Religion Study Group Conference on “Religion and the Individual”
  • Uzzell D. (2005) 'Planning for Emergency Behaviours'. Havana, Cuba: 3rd Latin-American Congress on Health Psychology

Books

  • Räthzel N, Uzzell D. (2013) Trade Unions in the Green Economy: Working for the Environment. London : Routledge

    Abstract

    Combating climate change will increasingly impact on production industries and the workers they employ as production changes and consumption is targeted. Yet research has largely ignored labour and its responses. This book brings together sociologists, psychologists, political scientists, historians, economists, and representatives from international and local unions based in Australia, Brazil, South Africa, Taiwan, Spain, Sweden, the UK and the USA. Together they open up a new area of research: Environmental Labour Studies. The authors ask what kind of environmental policies are unions in different countries and sectors developing. How do they aim to reconcile the protection of jobs with the protection of the environment? What are the forms of cooperation developing between trade unions and environmental movements, especially the so-called Red-Green alliances? Under what conditions are unions striving to create climate change policies that transcend the economic system? Where are they trying to find solutions that they see as possible within the present socio-economic conditions? What are the theoretical and practical implications of trade unions’ "Just Transition", and the problems and perspectives of "Green Jobs"? The authors also explore how food workers’ rights would contribute to low carbon agriculture, the role workers’ identities play in union climate change policies, and the difficulties of creating solidarity between unions across the global North and South. Trade Unions in the Green Economy opens the climate change debate to academics and trade unionists from a range of disciplines in the fields of labour studies, environmental politics, environmental management, and climate change policy. It will also be useful for environmental organisations, trade unions, business, and politicians.

  • Garcia Mira R, Uzzell D, Real Deus JE, Romay Martinez J. (2005) Housing, Space and Quality of Life. Aldershot : Ashgate

Book chapters

  • Murtagh N, Gatersleben B, Uzzell D. (2014) 'Identity Threat and Resistance to Change: Evidence and Implications from Transport-Related Behaviour'. in Breakwell G, Jaspal R (eds.) Identity Process Theory: Identity, Social Action and Social Change Cambridge : Cambridge University Press , pp. 335-356.
  • Uzzell D. (2014) 'Le flâneur-chercher: la vie et l’œuvre de Gabriel Moser'. in Marchand D, Depeau S, Weiss K (eds.) L’individu au risqué de l’environnement Paris : In Press , pp. 349-359.
  • Uzzell D. (2013) 'Greening the office and job satisfaction'. in Rioux L, Le Roy J, Rubens L, Le Conte J (eds.) Le confort au travail : que nous apprend la psychologie environnementale? Québec : Les Presses de L'Université Laval
  • Räthzel N, Uzzell D. (2013) 'Lokal plats, globalt rum. Solidaritet över gränserna och frågan om miljön'. in Lindberg I, Neergaard A (eds.) Bortom Horisonton. Fackets vägval i globaliseringens tid Stockholm : Premiss Förlag , pp. 343-373.
  • Uzzell D, Räthzel N. (2013) 'Local Place and Global Space: Solidarity Across Borders and the Question of the Environment'. in Räthzel N, Uzzell D (eds.) Trade Unions in the Green Economy Routledge
  • Uzzell D, Räthzel N. (2013) 'Mending the breach between labour and nature: A new research field'. in Räthzel N, Uzzell D (eds.) Trade Unions in the Green Economy Routledge
  • Uzzell D, White E. (2012) 'Changing Tastes: Meat in Our Life Histories'. in Jackson T, Christie I (eds.) Lifestyles Values and the Environment Routledge
  • Uzzell D, Rathzel N. (2010) 'La contextualisation de la psychologie environnementale: La nécessaire évolution de la psychologie environnementale'. in Weiss K, Girandola F (eds.) Psychology and Sustainable Development (Psychologie et développement durable) Paris : In-Press , pp. 247-277.
  • Uzzell D. (2010) 'Critical Comments for Critical Times: Questioning Psychology’s Contribution to a Sustainable Society'. in Mira RG, Marcote PV (eds.) Sostenibilidad, Valores y Cultura Ambiental Madrid : Ediciones Pirámide, S.A. , pp. 113-126.
  • Gatersleben B, White EV, Abrahamse W, Jackson T, Uzzell D. (2010) 'Values and sustainable lifestyles'. in Roaf S (ed.) Transforming Markets in the Built Environment Earthscan / James & James , pp. 37-50.
  • Uzzell D. (2009) 'Where is the discipline in heritage studies? A view from environmental psychology'. in Sorensen MLS, Carman J (eds.) Heritage Studies: methods and approaches London : Routledge , pp. 326-333.
  • Uzzell D, Ballantyne R. (2007) 'Heritage that hurts: interpretation in a post-modern world'. in Fairclough G, Harrison R, Jameson J, Schofield J (eds.) The Cultural Heritage Reader New York : Routledge , pp. 502-513.
  • Uzzell D, Ballantyne R. (2007) 'Heritage that hurts: interpretation in a post-modern world.'. in G. Fairclough , R. Harrison , Jnr. JJ, Schofield J (eds.) The Cultural Heritage Reader NY : Routledge
  • Moser G, Uzzell D. (2007) 'Environmental Psychology'. in Baumeister R, Vohs KD (eds.) Encyclopedia of Social Psychology San Fransisco : Sage
  • Clark C, Uzzell DL. (2006) 'The Socio-Environmental Affordances of Adolescents' Environments'. in Spencer C, Blades M (eds.) Children and their Environments Cambridge : Cambridge University Press , pp. 176-198.
  • Uzzell D. (2006) 'Interpreting our heritage: A theoretical interpretation'. in Smith L (ed.) Cultural Heritage: Critical Concepts in Media and Cultural Studies London : Routledge
  • García Mira R, Real Deus JE, Uzzell DL, Blanco Martinez G, Losada. D. (2005) 'Exploring Cognitive Representations of Citizens in Areas Affected by the 'Prestige' Disaster'. in Martens B, Keul AG (eds.) Designing Social Innovation: Planning, Building, Evaluating Göttingen : Hogrefe and Huber , pp. 137-145.
  • Gatersleben B, Uzzell D. (2004) 'Perceptions of car users and policy makers on the effectiveness and acceptability of car travel reduction measures: An attribution theory approach'. in Rothengatter T, Huguenin RD (eds.) Traffic and Transport Psychology: Theory and Applications Amsterdam : Elsevier , pp. 469-479.
  • Uzzell DL. (2004) 'A psicologia ambiental como uma chave para mudar atitudes e ações para com a sustentabilidade (Environmental Psychology as a Key to Changing Attitudes and Actions Towards Sustainability)'. in Tassara ETO, Rabinovich EP, Guedes MC (eds.) Psicologia e Ambiente São Paulo : EDUC / Fapesp / Capes , pp. 363-388.
  • Uzzell D. (2004) 'The Dialectic of Past-Present Relations'. in Barker D, Cranstone D (eds.) The Archaeology of Industrialisation, Post Medieval Archaeology Society Monograph No. 2 Leeds : Maney Publishing
  • Moser G, Uzzell D. (2003) 'Environmental Psychology'. in Dsc TMP, Lerner MJ (eds.) Comprehensive Handbook of Psychology, Volume 5: Personality and Social Psychology New York : Wiley 5 Article number 17 , pp. 419-445.

Internet publications

  • Uzzell D, Räthzel N. (2011) Why do individuals seem to be so unwilling to change their behavior when they readily accept that global climate change will affect us?. One Million Climate Jobs Campaign

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