Academic Profiles

Research Interests

If I were asked to provide a concise account of my research profile, I would point to three major themes, one being methodological and the other two relating to substantive topic areas. To begin with the methodological theme, although my PhD work was highly quantitative, most of my subsequent research has seen me employ a variety of qualitative approaches to explore a range of research topics. I have become quite passionate about the value of qualitative methods and am delighted to have seen them earn increasing acceptance within British psychology. Indeed, it gave me enormous pleasure to work with my former colleague, Evanthia Lyons, in producing an edited textbook on qualitative psychology (Analysing Qualitative Data in Psychology) in 2007 (currently being revised in preparation for a second edition).

However, I like to think of myself as much more than a methodological technician. Two substantive themes in my research and writing have concerned topics that I have seen as possessing significant social relevance. The first of these themes concerns various psychological aspects of lesbian and gay lives, such as sexual identity and psychotherapeutic practice with lesbian and gay clients. Perhaps the most notable output from this work was the publication in 2002 of Lesbian & Gay Psychology: New Perspectives (Oxford: BPS Blackwell) (edited with Celia Kitzinger), which received the 2003 award for Distinguished Book in Lesbian, Gay and/or Bisexual Psychology from the American Psychological Association’s Division 44 (the Society for the Psychological Study of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Issues).

In recent years, my interests have turned towards the Psychology of Religion and Spirituality, which represents a third theme in my research profile. This has been a longstanding area of professional and personal interest but the Psychology of Religion and Spirituality has, in recent years, taken a much more central role in my research and writing activities and in my plans for the future. One development that I have been delighted to encourage over the past few years has been the consistent interest expressed by trainees on the University of Surrey’s Practitioner Doctorates (PsychD) in Psychotherapeutic and Counselling Psychology and in Clinical Psychology to work with me in conducting research on various issues related to religion, spirituality and psychotherapy (see below). I look forward to developing this strand of work further with interested trainees from these programmes. In 2011-12, I began work on a project which looks at the social psychology of interfaith relations; with undergraduate and postgraduate students, I am gathering data from different religious traditions and groups, examining their outlooks on and experiences of engaging with other religious traditions. In 2012-13, I began a similarly structured project on how religious traditions/groups respond to people with mental health conditions within their congregations and communities and how people with mental health conditions experience religious communities. In addition, in Spring 2010, I provided a new final year undergraduate module on the Psychology of Religion within the BSc programme in Psychology, which allowed me to share my passion for the topic with undergraduate students in a formal way for the first time. This popular module is currently running for the third time.

Much of my past and present work has been framed in terms of social psychological approaches, theories and concepts, especially around identity (conceived in various ways but often in terms of identity process theory) and discourse. So, for example, in 2010, I completed a study looking at how members of a religious tradition that defines itself in terms of rationalism and liberalism position themselves and their religious tradition within discourses of rationalism, liberalism and religion and how they orient to associated ideological dilemmas. The consistent utilisation of a social psychological repertoire is not particularly surprising for someone who sees himself first and foremost as a Social Psychologist and who is proud to be the current Director of the University of Surrey’s MSc in Social Psychology.

One aspect of my role that gives me greatest pleasure is supervising the research of postgraduate students and trainees. Hence I would be very interested in hearing from anyone who is interested in working with me at MSc, PsychD or PhD level on issues relevant to the (social) psychology of religion and spirituality (prospective MSc students and PsychD trainees can become involved in the projects on the social psychology of interfaith relations and on religious communities and people with mental health conditions). More generally, I would be interested in hearing from others who are working in this field and who wish to exchange ideas.

Editorial Roles

I currently serve on the editorial board of the Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology.

Doctoral Supervision

To date, I have supervised (or co-supervised) the research of three PhD graduates, 75 graduates from the Practitioner Doctorate programme in Psychotherapeutic and Counselling Psychology and four graduates from the Practitioner Doctorate programme in Clinical Psychology. Details of PhD graduates’ work are provided below:

  • Dan Shepperd (2010) – ‘Discourses of friendship between heterosexual women and gay men’ (co-supervised with Peter Hegarty and previously with Evanthia Lyons)
  • Philip Baxter (2006) – ‘From Ubuzungu to Ubuntu: Resources for pastoral counselling in a Bantu context’ (co-supervised with Michael McCabe) (Fr Baxter’s PhD was in Practical Theology and was undertaken at the Milltown Institute of Theology and Philosophy, Dublin)
  • Chris Walton (2004) – ‘“It’s not a man thing, is it?” A critical discursive psychological analysis of masculinity and emotions’ (co-supervised with Evanthia Lyons)

I am currently supervising or co-supervising the work of seven PhD students whose research addresses the following topics:

  • Mona AlSheddi – ‘Moral identity: A cross-cultural investigation in Britain and Saudi Arabia’ (co-supervised with P. Sophie Russell)
  • Michaela Dewe – ‘A chronological analysis of scientific research activity and media advertising on smoking: 1950-2007’ (co-supervised with Jane Ogden)
  • Alice Herron – ‘Life-altering spiritual experience’
  • Bridget Jones – ‘Emotion and multiple sclerosis’ (co-supervised with Victoria Senior)
  • Lorraine Locke – ‘Contributing to a sociology of dreams through discursive psychology’ (co-supervised with Rob Meadows)
  • Vicky Marimuther – ‘Constructions and experiences of and responses to mild traumatic brain injury in the British military’ (co-supervised with Dora Brown)
  • Rory Slater – ‘Knowledge, power and the moral subject in modern organizations: Discourses of organizational citizenship’

The portfolios of PsychD graduates in Psychotherapeutic and Counselling Psychology and in Clinical Psychology who have conducted research related to psychology and religion/spirituality under my supervision are presented below:

  • Judith Gunasekera (2012) – ‘Experiences of collaborative work between Clinical and Counselling Psychologists and church-based Christian ministers’
  • Kate Potter (2012) – ‘A portfolio of academic, therapeutic practice and research work including an investigation of the use of mindfulness as a therapeutic intervention for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder’
  • Edith Steffen (2011) – ‘A portfolio of academic, therapeutic practice and research work including an investigation of “sense of presence” experiences and their role in meaning-making processes following bereavement’
  • May Karlsen (2010) – ‘A portfolio of academic, therapeutic practice and research work including an investigation of the role played by trusted adults in the spiritual lives of children: Towards a grounded theory of children’s accounts’ (co-supervised with Emma Williams)
  • Joanna Jackson (2009) – ‘A portfolio of academic, therapeutic practice and research work including two qualitative studies on ethical issues associated with psychotherapy and spirituality’
  • Jennifer Lochner (2009) – ‘A portfolio of academic, therapeutic practice and research work including processes involved in losing religious faith following traumatic events: A narrative analytic study’
  • Lynne Gravell (2007) – ‘A portfolio of academic, therapeutic practice and research work including an investigation into the spiritual and psychological development of a former alcoholic’
  • Sabrina Piergrossi (2007) – ‘A portfolio of academic, therapeutic practice and research work including an investigation of clients' perspectives on the relationship between Buddhist meditation and psychotherapy’
  • Iliana Stamogiannou (2007) – ‘A portfolio of academic, therapeutic practice and research work including an exploration of psychologists’ and clients’ experiences of addressing spirituality in cognitive-behavioural therapy’
  • Alessandra de Acutis (2006) – ‘A portfolio of academic, therapeutic practice and research work including an investigation into the integration of spirituality and religion in the training and practice of counselling psychology’ (co-supervised with Jason Ellis)
  • Valerie Suarez (2005) – ‘A portfolio of academic, therapeutic practice and research work including an investigation of psychotherapists’ and clients’ accounts of the integration of spirituality into psychotherapeutic practice’
  • Richard Golsworthy (1998) – ‘A portfolio of academic, therapeutic practice and research work including an investigation of the role of religious and spiritual beliefs in the search for meaning after bereavement’

In addition, I am currently supervising the research of five PsychD trainees (three in Counselling Psychology and two in Clinical Psychology) whose work is relevant to religion/spirituality:

  • Lauren Colgan – ‘Clinicians’ professional responses to Muslim service users: identifying and interpreting religious, cultural and clinical material’ (co-supervised with Sarfraz Jeraj)
  • Monia Conforti – ‘The use of sacred texts in therapy’
  • Danielle Oliver – ‘Therapeutic approaches to the interface between spiritual experience and psychosis’
  • Victoria Uwannah – ‘Experiences of people with mental health conditions in religious communities’
  • Charlie Whiteley – ‘Ultra-orthodox Jewish communities’ understandings of and responses to mental health and mental health services: Implications for ultra-orthodox people experiencing mental health difficulties’

Teaching

Current Postgraduate Courses

'Social Change and Influence' (PSY M013 – convenor and contributor) (core module for Social & Environmental Psychology MScs)

'Self and Identity in Context' (PSY M014 – contributor) (core module for Social & Environmental Psychology MScs)

'Qualitative Research Methods' (PSY M064 – convenor and primary contributor) (core module for all Psychology MSc programmes)

'Psychology of Religion' (PSY M063 - convenor and sole contributor) (optional module for Social Psychology MSc)

In addition, I contribute to another module on the Social and Environmental Psychology Masters programmes (PSY M028: 'Crafting Research – Linking Theories and Methods'). I also contribute to modules on the Practitioner Doctorate programmes in Psychotherapeutic and Counselling Psychology ('Lifespan Development'; 'Qualitative Research Methods'; 'Issues in Counselling Psychology') and Clinical Psychology ('Qualitative Research Methods').

Current Undergraduate Courses

'Applied Critical Thinking and Qualitative Data Analysis' (PSY2018 - co-convenor and contributor) (Psychology BSc)

'Psychology of Religion' (PSY3078 – convenor and sole contributor) (Psychology BSc)

In addition, I contribute to the BSc modules entitled 'Conceptual and Historical Issues in Psychology' (PSY1022) and ‘Introduction to Clinical and Counselling Psychology’ (PSY3074).

Departmental Duties

Within the School of Psychology, I fulfil the role of Director of the MSc in Social Psychology. 

I am also a Deputy Chair of the University of Surrey Research Ethics Committee.

Affiliations

Associate Fellow of the British Psychological Society (BPS)

Chartered Psychologist

Member of BPS Social Psychology Section, Community Psychology Section, Qualitative Methods in Psychology Section and Transpersonal Psychology Section

Member of the International Association for the Psychology of Religion

Conference Papers and Other Presentations

Conference Papers (2005 - present) 

Collicutt, J., & Coyle, A. (2013). Enriched readings or reductive colonisation? The present status and possible futures of the psychological study of the Bible in light of questions of interpretative legitimacy and persuasiveness. A paper presented at the International Association for the Psychology of Religion Congress; Lausanne; August 27-30.

Coyle, A., & Fernandez, E. (2013). ‘Stop labelling them as sensitive issues’: A qualitative exploration of Malay Muslim students’ perspectives on interfaith engagement in Malaysia. A paper presented at a conference on ‘Doing citizenship in multi-cultural and multi-faith societies’; Kingston University; December 18-19.

Jaspal, R., & Coyle, A. (2012). Social representations of peace and conflict: Debating Palestinian membership of the UN. A paper presented at the European Sociological Association Research Network 32 (Political Sociology) Second Interim Conference; Milan; November 30-December 1.

Jackson, J., Steffen, E., & Coyle, A. (2011). Exploring the value of interpretative pluralism in qualitative psychological studies of controversial and/or sensitive issues: Principles and practicalities.  A paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Psychological Society’s Division of Counselling Psychology; Bristol; July 14-16.

Coyle, A., Steffen, E., & Jackson, J. (2010). Exploring the value of interpretative pluralism in qualitative psychological studies of religious/spiritual issues: Principles and practicalities. A paper presented as part of a symposium on ‘Reflections on relative radicalism: Some developments in qualitative research in the psychology of religion’ (convenor: A. Coyle) at the Innovative Methods in the Study of Religion Conference; London; March 29-30.

Steffen, E., & Coyle, A. (2010). The experience of ‘sensing the presence of the deceased’ and spiritual meaning making in bereavement. A paper presented at the First International Conference of the British Association for the Study of Spirituality; Windsor; May 4-6.

Steffen, E., & Coyle, A. (2010). Speaking from within – speaking from without: Implications of taking a mixed insider-outsider perspective through co-participating in one’s own research. A paper presented at the Qualitative Methods in Psychology Section Conference of the British Psychological Society; Nottingham; August 23-25.

Xenaki, M., & Coyle, A. (2010). Grieving alone? Towards an understanding of the experience of bereaved single parents: An interpretative phenomenological analysis. A paper presented at the Third International Conference on Dying and Death in 18th-21st Century Europe: Refiguring Death Rites in Europe; Alba Iulia, Romania; September 3-5.

Coyle, A., & Lochner, J. (2009). Interpretative phenomenological analysis and clinical practice: therapists’ accounts of working with clients experiencing spiritual struggles following trauma. A paper presented as part of a symposium on ‘Applying psychological research to clinical practice’ at the British Psychological Society Annual Conference; Brighton; April 1-3.

Pope, J., Coyle, A., & Ogden, J. (2008). How do symptoms change? Accounts from participants attending a food intolerance clinic. A paper presented at a Joint Conference of the European Health Psychology Society and the British Psychological Society’s Division of Health Psychology, ‘Behaviour, Health and Healthcare: From Physiology to Policy’; Bath; September 9-12.

Coyle, A. (2006). Moving spirituality from the psychological margins and into psychotherapeutic practice: Reflections on a grounded analysis. A keynote address presented at a conference on Qualitative Research and Marginalisation; University of Leicester; May 3-5.

Shepperd, D., Coyle, A., & Hegarty, P. (2006). Accounts of difference and similarity in friendships between heterosexual women and gay men: A discourse analytic approach. A paper presented at the British Psychological Society’s Social Psychology Section Annual Conference; Birmingham; September.

Bowskill, M., Coyle, A., & Lyons, E. (2005). Navigating the place resources of diversity discourse: The faith schooling debate. A paper presented at the British Psychological Society Social Psychology Section Conference; Edinburgh; August 30-September 1.

Bowskill, Coyle, A., & Lyons, E. (2005). Here, there and everywhere: Charting the places of acculturation discourse. A poster presented at the European Association of Experimental Social Psychology General Meeting; Wurzburg, Germany; July 19-23.

Coyle, A., & Walton, C. (2005). ‘You’ve taken something really good and made it, you know, monstrous’: Lay negotiations of the permissibility of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis. A paper presented at the European Health Psychology Conference; Galway, Ireland; August 31-September 3.

Walton, C., & Coyle, A. (2005). Interfering with Mother Nature: Invocations of the ‘naturality’ discourse in the resistance of genetic technologies. A paper presented at the Ninth European Congress of Psychology; Grenada, Spain; July 3-8.

Other Talks and Seminars

Coyle, A., & Yeboah, Y. (2014). A qualitative exploration of understandings of ‘mental illness’ amongst English-resident first generation Ghanaians. Presentation made to the Health and Well-Being Research Group, School of Psychology, University of Surrey: March 12.

Coyle, A. (2012). The ethics of researching sensitive topics: A brief introduction. Presentation made as part of a workshop on ‘The ethics of researching sensitive topics’ organised by the University of Surrey Ethics Committee, University of Surrey: December 4.

Coyle, A., & Syafiq, M. (2011). Identity and disengagement from armed Jihadism in Indonesia: A qualitative analysis of former 'terrorist' prisoners' accounts. Presentation made as part of University College Cork's School of Psychology seminar series (jointly with the Study of Religions Department); November 1.

Coyle, A. (2010). Qualified rationalism and marginalised religion: Responses to potentially dilemmatic positions within British Unitarian text and talk on rationalism and religion. Presentation made as part of the CRONEM (Centre for Research on Nationalism, Ethnicity and Multiculturalism) seminar series, University of Surrey: October 18.

Coyle, A. (2009). Mental health, religion and spirituality. A sermon delivered at a service at Meadrow Unitarian Chapel, Godalming, Surrey: May 3.

Coyle, A., & Baxter, P. (2009). How do you talk of consulting ‘witchdoctors’ as a ‘good Christian’? Dilemmatic identity management by a Black African Catholic woman in conversation with a White European priest. A paper presented at the Social Psychology Open Day on ‘An unexpected experience’, University of Surrey: December 9.

Coyle, A. (2008). Rational, liberal religion: dilemmatic positions? Presentation made as part of the University of Surrey’s Department of Psychology seminar series: December 3.

Coyle, A. (2007). Qualitative methods and ‘the (partly) ineffable’ in psychological research on religion and spirituality. Presentation made as part of the University of Wolverhampton’s School of Applied Sciences seminar series: February 21.

External Examining

I am currently external examiner at University College Cork for the BA and MA programmes in Applied Psychology, the Higher Diploma in Psychology and Applied Psychology modules in other degree programmes.

I have acted as external examiner for six PhD theses (at the University of Birmingham, University College Cork, the University of Leeds, Loughborough University, the University of Manchester and Canterbury Christ Church University), one MSc thesis by research (the University of Buckingham), and also for many Practitioner Doctorate theses in Clinical Psychology and Counselling Psychology (at the University of Birmingham, Lancaster University, the University of Leicester, Regent's College London, the University of Wolverhampton and the Metanoia Institute).

Contact Me

E-mail:
Phone: 01483 68 6896

Find me on campus
Room: 29 AD 02

View Larger Map


My office hours

During academic semesters, I am available to see students in my office (29AD02) on a drop-in basis on Tuesdays from 1pm until 2pm and on Fridays from 1pm until 2pm. Outside these times, scheduled individual appointments can be arranged by emailing me.

Publications

To date, I have co-edited two books and authored or co-authored 58 articles in peer-reviewed journals, 30 book chapters and a wide range of reviews and commentaries. A selection of these publications is presented below, organised under general headings that reflect my main research interests; details of selected conference papers can be found under 'More'. Note that some publications are relevant to several topic areas so search under all relevant headings if you are looking for publications on a specific topic. If you would like a copy of any of these and can’t easily locate them through a library, some publications can be obtained in manuscript form from Surrey Research Insight Open Access Scholarship Online – or just email me.

Psychology of Religion and Spirituality

Karlsen, M.L., Coyle, A., & Williams, E. (2014). ‘They never listen’: Towards a grounded theory of the role played by trusted adults in the spiritual lives of children. Mental Health, Religion & Culture, 17(3), 297-312.

Coyle, A. (2011). Critical responses to Faith Development Theory: A useful agenda for change? Archive for the Psychology of Religion, 33, 281-298.

Coyle, A., & Lochner, J. (2011). Religion, spirituality and therapeutic practice. The Psychologist, 24, 264-266.

Coyle, A., & Lyons, E. (Eds) (2011). The social psychology of religion: Current research themes. A special issue of the Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology, 21, 461-540.

Coyle, A. (2010). Counselling psychology contributions to religion and spirituality. In M. Milton (Ed.), Therapy and beyond: Counselling psychology contributions to therapeutic and social issues (pp.259-275). Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.

Jaspal, R., & Coyle, A. (2010). ‘Arabic is the language of the Muslims – that's how it was supposed to be’: Exploring language and religious identity through reflective accounts from young British-born South Asians. Mental Health, Religion & Culture, 13, 17-36.

Steffen, E., & Coyle, A. (2010). Can 'sense of presence' experiences in bereavement be conceptualised as spiritual phenomena? Mental Health, Religion & Culture, 13, 273-291.

Jackson, J., & Coyle, A. (2009). The ethical challenge of working with spiritual difference: An interpretative phenomenological analysis of practitioners’ accounts. Counselling Psychology Review, 24(3 & 4), 86-99.

Coyle, A. (2008). Qualitative methods and ‘the (partly) ineffable’ in psychological research on religion and spirituality. Qualitative Research in Psychology, 5, 56-67.

Golsworthy, R., & Coyle, A. (2001). Practitioners' accounts of religious and spiritual dimensions in bereavement therapy. Counselling Psychology Quarterly, 14, 183-202.

Coyle, A., & Rafalin, D. (2000). Jewish gay men's accounts of negotiating cultural, religious, and sexual identity: A qualitative study. Journal of Psychology & Human Sexuality, 12(4), 21-48.

Golsworthy, R., & Coyle, A. (1999). Spiritual beliefs and the search for meaning in bereavement. Changes: An International Journal of Psychology and Psychotherapy, 17, 17-26.

Golsworthy, R., & Coyle, A. (1999). Spiritual beliefs and the search for meaning among older adults following partner loss. Mortality, 4, 21-40.

Loss and Bereavement

Xenaki, M., & Coyle. A. (in press). Grieving alone? Towards an understanding of the experience of bereaved single parents: An interpretative phenomenological analysis. In M. Rotar, A. Teodorescu & C. Rotar (Eds), Dying and Death in 18th-21st Century Europe: Volume 2 (pp.396-423). Newcastle-upon-Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

Steffen, E., & Coyle, A. (2012). ‘Sense of presence’ experiences in bereavement and their relationship to mental health: A critical examination of a continuing controversy. In C. Murray (Ed.), Mental health and anomalous experience (pp.33-56). Hauppauge, NY: Nova Science Publishers.

Steffen, E., & Coyle, A. (2011). Sense of presence experiences and meaning-making in bereavement: A qualitative analysis. Death Studies, 34, 579-609.

Steffen, E., & Coyle, A. (2010). Can 'sense of presence' experiences in bereavement be conceptualised as spiritual phenomena? Mental Health, Religion & Culture, 13, 273-291.

Thrift, O., & Coyle, A. (2005). An interpretative phenomenological analysis of maternal identity following child suicide. Counselling Psychology Review, 20(2), 18-23.

Osborne, J., & Coyle, A. (2002). Can parental responses to adult children with schizophrenia be conceptualized in terms of loss and grief? A case study analysis. Counselling Psychology Quarterly, 15, 307-323.

Golsworthy, R., & Coyle, A. (2001). Practitioners' accounts of religious and spiritual dimensions in bereavement therapy. Counselling Psychology Quarterly, 14, 183-202.

Golsworthy, R. & Coyle, A. (1999). Spiritual beliefs and the search for meaning in bereavement. Changes: An International Journal of Psychology and Psychotherapy, 17, 17-26.

Golsworthy, R. & Coyle, A. (1999). Spiritual beliefs and the search for meaning among older adults following partner loss. Mortality, 4, 21-40.

Wright, C. & Coyle, A. (1996). Experiences of AIDS-related bereavement among gay men: Implications for care. Mortality, 1, 267-282.

Social Psychology

Coyle, A., & Murtagh, N. (2014). Qualitative approaches to research using Identity Process Theory. In R. Jaspal & G.M. Breakwell (Eds), Identity Process Theory: Identity, Social Action and Social Change (pp.41-64). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Jaspal, R., & Coyle, A. (2014). Threat, victimhood, and peace: Debating the 2011 Palestinian UN state membership bid. Digest of Middle East Studies, 23(1), 190-214.

Slater, R., & Coyle, A. (2014). The governing of the self/the self-governing self: Multi-rater/source feedback and practices 1940-2011. Theory & Psychology, 24(2), 233-255.

Coyle, A., & Lyons, E. (Eds) (2011). The social psychology of religion: Current research themes. A special issue of the Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology, 21, 461-540.Jaspal, R., & Coyle, A. (2010). ‘My language, my people’: Language and ethnic identity among British-born South Asians. South Asian Diaspora, 2, 201-218.

Jaspal, R., & Coyle, A. (2009). Language and perceptions of identity threat. Psychology & Society, 2, 150-167.

Jaspal, R., & Coyle, A. (2009). Reconciling social psychology and sociolinguistics can have some benefits: Language and identity among second generation British Asians. Social Psychological Review, 11(2), 3-14.

Bowskill, M., Lyons, E., & Coyle, A. (2007). The rhetoric of acculturation: When integration means assimilation. British Journal of Social Psychology, 46, 793-813.

Shepherd, R., Barnett, J., Cooper, H., Coyle, A., Moran-Ellis, J., Senior, V., & Walton, C. (2007). Towards an understanding of British public attitudes concerning human cloning. Social Science & Medicine, 65, 377-392.

Hegarty, P., & Coyle, A. (Eds.) (2005). ‘Masculinity-femininity: An exception to a famous dictum?’ by Anne Constantinople (1973): A reappraisal. A special feature in Feminism & Psychology, 15, 379-440. 

Walton, C., Coyle, A., & Lyons, E. (2004). Death and football: An analysis of men’s talk about emotions. British Journal of Social Psychology, 43, 401-416.

Walton, C., Coyle, A., & Lyons, E. (2003). ‘There you are man’: Men’s use of emotion discourses and their negotiation of emotional subject positions. In R. Harré & F. Moghaddam (Eds) The self and others: Positioning individuals and groups in personal, political, and cultural contexts (pp.45-60). Westport, CT: Praeger.

Pugh, D., & Coyle, A. (2000). The construction of counselling psychology in Britain: A discourse analysis of counselling psychology texts. Counselling Psychology Quarterly, 13, 85-98.

Turner, A.J. & Coyle, A. (2000). What does it mean to be a donor offspring? The identity experiences of adults conceived by donor insemination and the implications for counselling and therapy. Human Reproduction, 15, 2041-2051.

Lesbian and Gay Psychology

Spiliotis, D., Brown, D., & Coyle, A. (2011). The psychotherapeutic tales of five gay men in Greece: A narrative analysis. Psychology of Sexualities Review, 2(1), 25-40.

Shepperd, D., Coyle, A., & Hegarty, P. (2010). Discourses of friendship between heterosexual women and gay men: Mythical norms and an absence of desire. Feminism & Psychology, 20, 205-224.

Bennett, C., & Coyle, A. (2007). A minority within a minority: Experiences of gay men with intellectual disabilities. In V. Clarke & E. Peel (Eds), Out in psychology: Lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer perspectives (pp.125-145). Chichester: Wiley. 

Milton, M., Coyle, A., & Legg, C. (2005). Countertransference issues in psychotherapy with lesbian and gay clients. European Journal of Psychotherapy, Counselling and Health, 7, 181-197.

Milton, M., & Coyle, A. (2003). Sexual identity: Affirmative practice with lesbian and gay clients. In R. Woolfe, W. Dryden & S. Strawbridge (Eds) Handbook of counselling psychology (2nd ed.) (pp.481-499). London: Sage.

Coyle, A., & Kitzinger, C. (Eds) (2002). Lesbian & gay psychology: New perspectives. Oxford: BPS Blackwell.

Coyle, A., & Wilkinson, S. (Eds) (2002). Social psychological perspectives on lesbian and gay issues in Europe: The state of the art. A special issue of the Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology, 12.

Milton, M., Coyle, A., & Legg, C. (2002). Lesbian and gay affirmative psychotherapy: Defining the domain. In A. Coyle & C. Kitzinger (Eds), Lesbian and gay psychology: New perspectives (pp. 175-197). Oxford: BPS Blackwell.

Touroni, E., & Coyle, A. (2002). Decision-making in planned lesbian parenting: An interpretative phenomenological analysis. Journal of Community & Applied Social Psychology, 12, 194-209.

Qualitative Psychology and Other Research Issues

Dewe, M., & Coyle. A. (forthcoming). Reflections on a study of responses to research on smoking: A pragmatic, pluralist variation on a qualitative psychological theme. Review of Social Studies.

Coyle, A., & Murtagh, N. (2014). Qualitative approaches to research using Identity Process Theory. In R. Jaspal & G.M. Breakwell (Eds), Identity Process Theory: Identity, Social Action and Social Change (pp.41-64). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Coyle, A. (2012). Discourse analysis. In G.M. Breakwell, J.A. Smith & D.B. Wright (Eds), Research Methods in Psychology (4th edn.) (pp.485-509). London: Sage.Coyle, A. (2010). Qualitative research and anomalous experience: A call for interpretative pluralism [Commentary]. Qualitative Research in Psychology, 7,79-83.

Coyle, A. (2008). Qualitative methods and ‘the (partly) ineffable’ in psychological research on religion and spirituality. Qualitative Research in Psychology, 5, 56-67.

Lyons, E., & Coyle, A. (Eds) (2007). Analysing qualitative data in psychology. London: Sage.

Coyle, A., & Olsen, C. (2005). Research in therapeutic practice settings: Ethical considerations. In R. Tribe & J. Morrissey (Eds), Handbook of professional and ethical practice for psychologists, counsellors and psychotherapists (pp.249-262). Hove: Brunner-Routledge.

Coyle, A. (1998). Qualitative research in counselling psychology: Using the counselling interview as a research instrument. In P. Clarkson (Ed.), Counselling psychology: Integrating theory, research and supervised practice (pp.56-73). London: Routledge.

Theology and Religious Studies

Coyle, A. (2012). The relationship between Adomnán of Iona’s Life of St Columba and Celtic Christianity/spirituality. Journal for the Study of Spirituality, 2(1), 77-90.

Page Owner: pss1ac
Page Created: Wednesday 25 November 2009 14:38:15 by pss1ab
Last Modified: Tuesday 29 April 2014 16:06:54 by pss1ac
Expiry Date: Friday 25 February 2011 14:33:49
Assembly date: Fri Jul 25 02:36:26 BST 2014
Content ID: 19176
Revision: 85
Community: 1202