Academic Profiles

Research Interests

  • `Inner space’: exploring inner worlds and facilitating individual learning and personal development through systemic modes of coaching, especially `Clean Language’ (a metaphor-based practice) and Neuro-linguistic Programming.
  • Organisational learning, especially the work of Gregory Bateson and his theory of `levels of learning’ and its applications; paradoxical features of organisational change strategies, such as unintended consequences.
  • Phenomenological research methods: innovations such as applications of `Clean Language’ to research; Psycho-phenomenology; the role of metaphor and epistemic questions.
  • Transformative learning theory and practice: enquiry-based learning, experiential learning, creativity, and complexity theory in Higher Education; Team Academy (a Finnish approach to enterprise and leadership education).

Teaching

Undergraduate: `Issues in Human Resource Management'; professional training supervision; personal tutoring

Postgraduate: MBA module `Strategic Change Management’ (Convenor); MSc and MBA dissertation supervision

DBA supervision

Doctoral supervision (as first supervisor):

  • Richard Churches 
  • Heather Cairns-Lee
  • Thuraya Said

Departmental Duties

Head of PhD Programmes, Surrey Business School

University of Surrey Validation Board

Faculty of Management and Law Research Ethics Committee

Affiliations

University Forum for Human Resource Development (Council, Surrey representative) 

Chair, Programme and Qualifications sub-committee, UFHRD

Association for Neuro-Linguistic Programming

Editor in chief,`Current Research in NLP'

Editorial board member:

Contact Me

E-mail:
Phone: 01483 68 9763

Find me on campus
Room: 53 MS 03


My office hours

My office hours this semester are usually on Tuesdays 10-11 and Wednesdays 10-12; these hours can vary so please check the noticeboard outside my office.   

Publications

Highlights

  • Tosey PC, Lawley J, Meese R. (2014) 'Eliciting Metaphor through Clean Language: an Innovation in Qualitative Research'. British Journal of Management,
  • Tosey PC, Dhaliwal S, Hassinen J. (2013) 'The Finnish Team Academy model: implications for management education'. Sage Management Learning, published online

    Abstract

    This article explores an innovative model of management education, the Team Academy based in Finland, in which teams of learners create and operate real enterprises, supported by coaches. The contributions of the article are to provide insights into how the Team Academy works, and to review its implications for theories of management learning and educational design. Based on a case study of the Team Academy model we argue that management education programmes need to be construed as artificially-created learning environments, and specifically as `micro-cultures’ - local contexts in which pedagogical and cultural practices coalesce. The concept of a micro-culture can bring together four main attributes of learning environments (social embeddedness, real-worldness, identity formation and normative). Construing learning environments in this way has likely important implications for the theory and practice of management learning and education, since a micro-culture is a complex, emergent phenomenon that is not necessarily controllable or transferable.

  • Tosey PC, Visser M, Saunders MNK. (2012) 'The origins and conceptualisations of `triple-loop’ learning: a critical review'. Sage Management Learning, 43 (3), pp. 289-305.
  • Mathison J, Tosey P. (2010) 'Exploring Inner Landscapes: NLP and Psycho-phenomenology as innovations in researching first-person experience'. Emerald Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management, 5 (1), pp. 63-82.

    Abstract

    This paper explores a contemporary European development in research into first person accounts of experience, called psychophenomenology (Vermersch 2004), that offers enhancements to phenomenological interviewing. It is a form of guided introspection that seeks to develop finely-grained first-person accounts by using distinctions in language, internal sensory representations and imagery that have been incorporated from neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) (Bandler & Grinder 1975a). It is also a participative, relational and developmental form of interviewing, in the sense that the interviewee can gain significant insight into their experience; the process is not concerned purely with data gathering.

  • Tosey P, Mathison J. (2009) Neuro-Linguistic Programming: a critical appreciation for managers and developers. Palgrave Macmillan
  • Mathison J, Tosey P. (2008) 'Riding into Transformative Learning'. Journal of Consciousness Studies, 15 (5), pp. 67-88.
  • Willoughby G, Tosey P. (2007) 'Imagine 'meadfield': Appreciative inquiry as a process for leading school improvement'. Sage Educational Management Administration and Leadership, 35 (4), pp. 499-520.

    Abstract

    This article examines an application of appreciative inquiry (AI), a contemporary approach to organisational change that is increasingly evident in the business world, as a participative means of school improvement. AI appears relevant to contemporary themes in literature on school improvement such as self-evaluation, capacity-building and distributed forms of leadership. Appreciative inquiry is introduced and its literature reviewed, with reference to its growing use both in business and in American schools. The authors then report on `Imagine Meadfield1’, the first known large-scale appreciative inquiry undertaken in an English secondary school, with particular reference to the experience of the head teacher (first author) who led this process. The article critically reviews this experience in order to assess the potential of AI for school improvement.

  • Tosey P. (2005) 'The hunting of the learning organization - A paradoxical journey'. SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD MANAGEMENT LEARNING, 36 (3), pp. 335-352.

Journal articles

  • Tosey PC, Lawley J, Meese R. (2014) 'Eliciting Metaphor through Clean Language: an Innovation in Qualitative Research'. British Journal of Management,
  • Tosey PC, Dhaliwal S, Hassinen J. (2013) 'The Finnish Team Academy model: implications for management education'. Sage Management Learning, published online

    Abstract

    This article explores an innovative model of management education, the Team Academy based in Finland, in which teams of learners create and operate real enterprises, supported by coaches. The contributions of the article are to provide insights into how the Team Academy works, and to review its implications for theories of management learning and educational design. Based on a case study of the Team Academy model we argue that management education programmes need to be construed as artificially-created learning environments, and specifically as `micro-cultures’ - local contexts in which pedagogical and cultural practices coalesce. The concept of a micro-culture can bring together four main attributes of learning environments (social embeddedness, real-worldness, identity formation and normative). Construing learning environments in this way has likely important implications for the theory and practice of management learning and education, since a micro-culture is a complex, emergent phenomenon that is not necessarily controllable or transferable.

  • Nieswandt M, Saunders MNK, Akinci C, Tosey P. (2013) 'Erfolgreich Veränderungen gestalten durch ein starkes Mittelmanagement'. Der Betriebswirt – Management in Wissenschaft und Praxis, Germany: 54 (1), pp. 12-18.
  • Calver J, Cuthbert G, Davison S, Devins D, Gold J, Hughes I, Tosey PC. (2012) 'HRD in 2020: a hop-on, hop-off city tour'. Human Resource Development International, , pp. 1-12.
  • Tosey PC, Visser M, Saunders MNK. (2012) 'The origins and conceptualisations of `triple-loop’ learning: a critical review'. Sage Management Learning, 43 (3), pp. 289-305.
  • Day T, Tosey PC. (2011) 'Beyond SMART? A new framework for goal setting'. Tsylor & Francis The Curriculum Journal, 22 (4), pp. 515-534.

    Abstract

    This article extends currently reported theory and practice in the use of learning goals or targets with students in secondary and further education. Goal-setting and action-planning constructs are employed in personal development plans (PDPs) and personal learning plans (PLPs) and are advocated as practice within the English national policy agenda with its focus on personalisation. The article argues that frameworks widely used for goal setting and action planning by UK educational practitioners, in particular SMART targets or goals, have yet to be rigorously examined in the light of relevant theory and practice. Doing so is important given contemporary emphasis on the dimensions of the learner experience regarded by ‘learning to learn’ practitioners as underpinning effective learning in the modern classroom. The article draws from social cognitive theory and achievement goal theory, including Zimmerman’s criteria for appropriate goals, to suggest an alternative framework for goal or target setting – ‘well-formed outcomes’, a construct from the field of neurolinguistic programming (NLP). In comparison with SMART targets, the authors argue that well-formed outcomes offer a more rigorous and holistic approach, by taking greater account of the learner’s identity, affective dimensions (feelings and emotions), social relations and values, as well as encouraging mental rehearsal.

  • Mathison J, Tosey P. (2010) 'Exploring Inner Landscapes: NLP and Psycho-phenomenology as innovations in researching first-person experience'. Emerald Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management, 5 (1), pp. 63-82.

    Abstract

    This paper explores a contemporary European development in research into first person accounts of experience, called psychophenomenology (Vermersch 2004), that offers enhancements to phenomenological interviewing. It is a form of guided introspection that seeks to develop finely-grained first-person accounts by using distinctions in language, internal sensory representations and imagery that have been incorporated from neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) (Bandler & Grinder 1975a). It is also a participative, relational and developmental form of interviewing, in the sense that the interviewee can gain significant insight into their experience; the process is not concerned purely with data gathering.

  • Tosey P, Mathison J. (2010) 'Neuro-linguistic programming as an innovation in education and teaching'. TAYLOR & FRANCIS INNOVATIONS IN EDUCATION AND TEACHING INTERNATIONAL, 47 (3), pp. 317-326.

    Abstract

    Neuro‐linguistic programming (NLP) – an emergent, contested approach to communication and personal development created in the 1970s – has become increasingly familiar in education and teaching. There is little academic work on NLP to date. This article offers an informed introduction to, and appraisal of, the field for educators. We review the origins of NLP, and summarise its nature as a method of, and conceptual framework for, education and teaching, with brief examples of applications. We argue that NLP offers an innovative praxis, underpinned in principle by Bateson's epistemological thinking, which informs a distinctive methodology known as ‘modelling’. The credibility of the field relies, in our view, on its ability to address seven critical issues. These form a possible research agenda and a focus for dialogue between NLP practitioner and academic communities.

  • Mathison J, Tosey P. (2009) 'Exploring Moments of Knowing; Neuro-Linguistic Programming and enquiry into inner landscapes'. Journal of Consciousness Studies, 16 (10)
  • Tosey P. (2008) 'It’s a Living Thing: a Neuro-Linguistic Programming perspective on essay writing'. Humanising Language Teaching, 0 (0)
  • Tosey P, Mathison J. (2008) 'Do Organisations Learn? Some implications for HRD of Bateson’s levels of learning'. SAGE Human Resource Development Review, 7 (1), pp. 13-31.

    Abstract

    This article explores and appraises Gregory Bateson’s theory of `levels of learning’ (Bateson, 2000a) and its implications for Human Resource Development, especially with reference to issues of organisational learning. In Part One, after briefly reviewing Bateson’s biography we describe the origins and contents of the theory. In Part Two, three particular features of the theory are explored, together with their practical and theoretical implications for HRD: 1. The significance of the recursive relationship between the levels; 2. Bateson’s theory is not a stage theory of learning; `higher’ levels of learning are neither superior to, nor necessarily more desirable than, lower levels; 3. Bateson’s emphasis on the notion of context, which implies that the task of management involves sensitivity to such contexts. In Part Three the discussion emphasises the holistic nature of Bateson’s theory, in that the levels of learning combine cognitive, embodied and aesthetic dimensions. We review some limitations of the theory, then conclude by considering its perspective on the question, `do organisations learn?’.

  • Mathison J, Tosey P. (2008) 'Riding into Transformative Learning'. Journal of Consciousness Studies, 15 (5), pp. 67-88.
  • Tosey P. (2008) 'Once Upon a Time… Tales of Organisational Learning'. Emerald The Learning Organization, 15 (6), pp. 454-462.

    Abstract

    The purpose of this paper is to enrich the conceptual vocabulary of organisational learning by discussing the relevance of the interdisciplinary work of Gregory Bateson, an original and challenging twentieth century thinker.

  • Tosey P. (2008) 'Innovations in Constructivist Research: NLP, psycho-phenomenology and the exploration of inner landscapes'. The Psychotherapist, 37 (0), pp. 5-8.
  • Willoughby G, Tosey P. (2007) 'Imagine 'meadfield': Appreciative inquiry as a process for leading school improvement'. Sage Educational Management Administration and Leadership, 35 (4), pp. 499-520.

    Abstract

    This article examines an application of appreciative inquiry (AI), a contemporary approach to organisational change that is increasingly evident in the business world, as a participative means of school improvement. AI appears relevant to contemporary themes in literature on school improvement such as self-evaluation, capacity-building and distributed forms of leadership. Appreciative inquiry is introduced and its literature reviewed, with reference to its growing use both in business and in American schools. The authors then report on `Imagine Meadfield1’, the first known large-scale appreciative inquiry undertaken in an English secondary school, with particular reference to the experience of the head teacher (first author) who led this process. The article critically reviews this experience in order to assess the potential of AI for school improvement.

  • Tosey P. (2005) 'The hunting of the learning organization - A paradoxical journey'. SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD MANAGEMENT LEARNING, 36 (3), pp. 335-352.
  • Tosey P, Robinson G. (2002) 'When change is no longer enough: What do we mean by "transformation" in organizational change work?'. Emerald TQM Magazine, 14 (2), pp. 100-109.

    Abstract

    The term `transformation’ is much used in the practice and literature of management and organizations. We are curious as to why there has been little challenge to or questioning of usage of the term.

Conference papers

  • Tosey PC. (2011) '`Symbolic Modelling’ as an innovative phenomenological method in HRD research: the work-life balance project'. University of Gloucestershire: 12th International Conference on HRD Research and Practice across Europe

    Abstract

    Gibson and Hanes (2003) argue that phenomenology can make a significant contribution to research in Human Resource Development (HRD). Conklin suggests that studies such as Gibson’s ( 2004) investigation of the experience of being mentored for women faculty provide support for the use of phenomenology to enquire into `organizational phenomena and managerial behavior’ and reports ( 2007:285) that Gibson and Hanes; `identify multiple outlets within human resource development research for the employment of this approach, including insights into the experience of working in human resource development and understanding the meaning of participants’ experiences of particular organizational phenomena.’ Conklin also identifies challenges to phenomenology, based for example on questions about the limitations of reflexivity (Alvesson, Hardy, & Harley 2008) and about the assumptions embedded in the transcendental approach taken by Edmund Husserl, the founder of phenomenology. Among those challenges are concerns about: The tacit use of the authority of the phenomenological researcher to decide what is important or relevant in an interviewee’s account; The argument that the researcher creates, and does not just record, meaning; The difficulty of achieving epoche, a central feature of phenomenological research whereby `a researcher attempts to put in abeyance presuppositions and prejudices she may carry with her into the field.’ (Conklin 2007:277). This paper addresses these methodological problems by reporting on the application of an innovative, metaphor-based practice called `symbolic modelling’ (Lawley & Tompkins 2000) as a research method through a project that explored work-life balance as experienced by six managers. The paper argues that symbolic modelling is a method through which the above problems can be managed more systematically (though not removed). Specifically, symbolic modelling is able to: Distinguish clearly between metaphors introduced by a researcher into their questions or as an interpretive device, and those that originate in, belong to, and faithfully represent, interviewees’ subjective worlds. While the researcher still makes decisions about where to direct attention, the method increases confidence that the meaning being explored is that of the interviewee. Make the interviewee’s metaphor the focal criterion for the relevance or significance of interviewee data. Provide explicit and systematic principles and techniques that can be shared a

  • Tosey P, Mathison J. (2009) 'Transformative learning: from critical reflection to emergence through guided introspection?'. Newcastle Business School, UK: 10th International Conference on Human Resource Development Research and Practice Across Europe
    [ Status: Unpublished ]
  • Tosey P, Mathison J, Langley D. (2008) 'Flesh and Blood and Action: Organisations, Learning and Aesthetics'. Lille: 9th International Conference on Human Resource Development Research and Practice across Europe
    [ Status: Unpublished ]

Books

  • Tosey P, Mathison J. (2009) Neuro-Linguistic Programming: a critical appreciation for managers and developers. Palgrave Macmillan

Book chapters

  • Tosey PC. (2014) 'Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP): A Case of Unorthodox Knowledge in HRD?'. in Walton J, Valentin C (eds.) Human Resource Development: Practices and Orthodoxies Palgrave Macmillan Article number 5 , pp. 107-124.
  • Tosey P, Langley D, Mathison J. (2010) 'Bateson’s Levels of Learning as a Conceptual Framework for Workplace Learning'. in van Woerkom M, Poell R (eds.) Workplace Learning: Concepts, Measurement, and Application London : Routledge , pp. 55-68.
  • Tosey P. (2010) 'Neuro-Linguistic Programming for Leaders and Managers'. in Gold J, Thorpe R, Mumford A (eds.) Gower Handbook of Leadership and Management Development 5 Edition. , pp. 313-329.
  • Tosey P, McDonnell J, Airey DW. (2009) 'Emergent conceptions of enquiry-based learning'. in (ed.) FDTL Voices: Drawing from Learning and Teaching Projects York : Higher Education Academy , pp. 68-78.

Reports

  • Carey J, Churches R, Hutchinson G, Jones J, Tosey PC. (2009) Neuro-linguistic programming and learning: teacher case studies on the impact of NLP in education. in (ed.) Neuro-linguistic programming and learning: teacher case studies on the impact of NLP in education Reading :

Page Owner: msx095
Page Created: Tuesday 26 May 2009 13:08:50 by t00346
Last Modified: Wednesday 18 June 2014 16:52:29 by pj0010
Assembly date: Fri Jul 25 23:10:21 BST 2014
Content ID: 5054
Revision: 30
Community: 1168