Outputs

Outputs, tools and resources from the Surrey Assessment and Learning Lab.

Publications

  • Balloo, K., Evans, C., Hughes, A., Zhu, X., & Winstone, N. (2018). Transparency isn’t spoon-feeding: How a transformative approach to the use of explicit assessment criteria can support student self-regulation. Frontiers in Education, 3, (16).
  • Medland, E. (2019). ‘I’m an assessment illiterate’: towards a shared discourse of assessment literacy for external examiners. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education44(4), 565-580.
  • Medland, E. (2016) Assessment in higher education: drivers, barriers and directions for change in the UK. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 41(1), 81 – 96.
  • Medland, E. (2015) Examining the Assessment Literacy of External Examiners. London Review of Education, 13(3), 21-33.  
  • Pitt, E., & Winstone, N. (2018). The impact of anonymous marking on students’ perceptions of fairness, feedback, and relationships with lecturers. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 43(7), 1183-1193
  • Winstone, N.E., & Pitt, E. (2020). How can you establish rapport and respect in doctoral assessment? In P. Denicolo, D. Duke, & J. Reeves (Eds.), Delivering inspiring doctoral assessment (pp. 74-91). London: Sage.
  • Balloo, K., & Vashakidze, A. (2020). Facilitating students’ proactive recipience of feedback with feedback portfolios. In K. Gravett, N. Yakovchuk, & I. M. Kinchin (Eds.), Enhancing student-centred teaching in higher education: The landscape of student-staff research partnerships (pp. 255-272). Cham: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Dainton, C., Opitz, B., Winstone, N. E., & Klaver, P. (2020). Utility of feedback has a greater impact on learning than ease of decoding. Mind, Brain, & Education, advance online publication.
  • Gravett, K. (2020). Feedback literacies as sociomaterial practice. Critical Studies in Education, advance online publication.
  • Gravett, K., Kinchin, I. M., Winstone, N. E., Balloo, K., Heron, M., Hosein, A., Lygo-Baker, S., & Medland, E. (2019). The development of academics’ feedback literacy: experiences of learning from critical feedback via scholarly peer review. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, advance online publication.
  • Gravett, K., & Winstone, N. E. (2019). Feedback interpreters: the role of learning development professionals in facilitating university students’ engagement with feedback. Teaching in Higher Education, 24(6), 723-738.
  • Gregory, S.E.A., Winstone, N.E., Ridout, N., & Nash, R.A. (2020). Weak memory for future-oriented feedback: Investigating the roles of attention and improvement focus. Memory, 28(2), 216-236.
  • Kinchin, I. M., Winstone, N. E., & Medland, E. (2020). Considering the concept of recipience in student learning from a modified Bernsteinian perspective. Studies in Higher Education, advance online publication.
  • Nash, R. A., & Winstone, N. E.  (2017).  Responsibility sharing in the giving and receiving of assessment feedback. Frontiers in Psychology, 8, 1519.
  • Nash, R. A., Winstone, N. E., Gregory, S. E. A., & Papps, E. (2018). A memory advantage for past-oriented over future-oriented performance feedback. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 44(12), 1864-1879.
  • Parker, M., & Winstone, N. (2016). Students’ perceptions of interventions for supporting their engagement with feedback. Practitioner Research in Higher Education. 10(1), 53-64.
  • Pitt, E., & Winstone, N. (2018). The impact of anonymous marking on students’ perceptions of fairness, feedback, and relationships with lecturers. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 43(7), 1183-1193.
  • Pitt, E., & Winstone, N. (forthcoming, 2020). Dialogic feedback in a digital world. In M. Bearman, P. Dawson, J. Tai, R. Ajjawi, & D. Boud (Eds.), Re-imagining university assessment in a digital world. Springer.
  • Winstone, N. E. (2019). Facilitating students' use of feedback: Capturing and tracking impact using digital tools. In M. Henderson, R. Ajjawi, D. Boud, & E. Molloy (eds), The impact of feedback in higher education: Improving assessment outcomes for learners (pp.225-242). London: Palgrave.
  • Winstone, N. E., & Boud, D. (2019). Exploring cultures of feedback practice: The adoption of learning-focused feedback practices in the UK and Australia. Higher Education Research and Development, 38(2), 411-425.
  • Winstone, N. E., & Boud, D. (2019). Developing assessment feedback: From occasional survey to everyday practice. In S. Lygo-Baker, I. M. Kinchin, & N. E. Winstone (Eds.), Engaging student voices in higher education: Diverse perspectives and expectations in partnership (pp. 109-123). London: Palgrave.
  • Winstone, N. E., & Carless, D. (2020). Designing effective feedback processes in higher education: A learning-focused approach. London: Routledge.
  • Winstone, N. E., Hepper, E. G., & Nash, R. A. (2020). Individual differences in self-reported use of feedback information: The mediating role of feedback beliefs. Educational Psychology, advance online publication.
  • Winstone, N. E., Mathlin, G., & Nash, R. A. (2019). Building feedback literacy: Students’ perceptions of the Developing Engagement with Feedback Toolkit. In Frontiers in Education (Vol. 4, p. 39).
  • Winstone, N. E., & Nash, R. A. (2019). Developing students’ proactive engagement with feedback. In C. Bryan & K. Clegg (Eds.), Innovative assessment in higher education: A handbook for academic practitioners (pp.129-138). London: Taylor and Francis.
  • Winstone, N., Nash., R., Parker, M., & Rowntree, J. (2017). Supporting learners’ engagement with feedback: A systematic review and a taxonomy of recipience processes. Educational Psychologist, 52, 17-37.
  • Winstone, N., Nash, R., Rowntree, J., & Parker, M. (2017). “It’d be useful, but I wouldn’t use it”. Barriers to University students’ feedback seeking and recipience. Studies in Higher Education, 42(11), 2026-2041. 
  • Winstone, N. E., Pitt, E., & Nash, R. A. (2020). Educators’ perceptions of responsibility-sharing in feedback processes. Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, advance online publication.
  • Balloo, K., Pauli, R., & Worrell, M. (2016). Individual differences in psychology undergraduates’ development of research methods knowledge and skills. Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, 217, 790–800.
  • Balloo, K. (2018). In-depth profiles of the expectations of undergraduate students commencing university: a Q methodological analysis. Studies in Higher Education, 43(12), 2251-2262.
  • Balloo, K., Pauli, R., & Worrell, M. (2017). Undergraduates’ personal circumstances, expectations and reasons for attending university. Studies in Higher Education, 42(8), 1373-1384.
  • Balloo, K., Pauli, R., & Worrell, M. (2018). Conceptions of research methods learning among psychology undergraduates: A Q methodology study. Cognition and Instruction, 36(4), 279–296.
  • Balloo, K. (2019). Students’ difficulties during research methods training acting as potential barriers to their development of scientific thinking. In M. Murtonen & K. Balloo (Eds.), Redefining scientific thinking for higher education: Higher-order thinking, evidence-based reasoning and research skills (pp. 107–137). Cham: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Cook, A., Ogden, J., & Winstone, N. (2016). The experiences of learning, friendships and bullying of boys with autism in mainstream and special school settings. British Journal of Special Education, 43(3), 250-271.
  • Cook, A., Ogden, J., & Winstone, N. (2018). Friendship motivations, challenges, and the role of masking for girls with autism in contrasting school settings. European Journal of Special Needs Education, 33(3), 302-315.
  • Cook, A., Ogden, J., & Winstone, N. (2019). The impact of a school-based musical contact intervention on prosocial attitudes, emotions and behaviours: A pilot trial with autistic and neurotypical children. Autism, 23(4), 933-942.
  • Davis, A., & Winstone, N. (2017). Educational Implications. In A. Slater & G. Bremner (Eds.), An Introduction to Developmental Psychology (3rd ed.). Wiley
  • Gravett, K. (2019).Troubling transitions and celebrating becomings: from pathway to rhizome. Studies in Higher Education, advance online publication.
  • Gravett, K. and Gill, C. (2010) ‘Using online video to promote database searching skills: the creation of a virtual tutorial for Health and Social Care students’. Journal of Information Literacy, 4(1), 66-71.
  • Gravett, K. and Kinchin, I. M. (2020) The role of referencing within students’ identity development. Journal of Further and Higher Education, in press.
  • Gravett, K. and Kinchin, I. M. (2020). Referencing and empowerment: exploring barriers to agency in the higher education student experience.Teaching in Higher Education, 25(1), 84-97.
  • Gravett, K., Kinchin, I.M., & Winstone, N.E. (2019). ‘More than customers’: Conceptions of students as partners held by students, staff, and institutional leaders. Studies in Higher Education, advance online publication.
  • Gravett, K., Kinchin, I. M., & Winstone, N. E. (2019). Frailty in transition? Troubling the norms, boundaries and limitations of transition theory and practice. Higher Education Research and Development, advance online publication.
  • Gravett, K., & Winstone, N. E. (2019). Storying students’ becomings into and through higher education. Studies in Higher Education, advance online publication.
  • Heron, M. (2017). Dialogic stance in higher education seminars. Language & Education 32(2), 112-126.
  • Heron, M. (2017). Dialogic stance in higher education seminars.  Language and Education, 32(2), 112-126.
  • Heron, M. (2018). Pedagogic practices to support international students in seminar discussions. Higher Education Research & Development, 38(2), 266-279. 
  • Heron, M. (2019). Making the case for oracy skills in higher education: practices and opportunities. Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice16(2), 9.
  • Heron, M., & Head, R. (2019). Discourses of peer observation in higher education: Event or system?. Innovations in Education and Teaching International56(4), 458-469.
  • Heron M., Palfreyman D. M. (2019) Developing Oracy Skills for Student Voice Work, In: Lygo-Baker Simon, Kinchin Ian, Winstone Naomi (eds.), Engaging Student Voices in Higher Education pp. 89-105 Palgrave Macmillan
  • Heron, M., & Thompson, H. (2019). How do trainee teachers engage with a flipped learning approach?. Journal of Digital Learning in Teacher Education35(2), 92-106.
  • Hollywood, A., Spencely, C., McCarthy, D., & Winstone, N. E. (2019). ‘Overwhelmed at first’: The experience of career development in early-career academics. Journal of Further and Higher Education, advance online publication.
  • Hulme, J. A., & Winstone, N. E. (2017). Do no harm: Risk aversion versus risk management in the context of pedagogic frailty. Knowledge Management and E-Learning, 9(3), 153-169.
  • Kinchin, I., Heron, M., Hosein, A., Lygo-Baker, S., Medland, E., Morley, D., & Winstone, N. (2018). Researcher-led academic development. International Journal for Academic Development23(4), 339-354.
  • Kinchin, I. M., & Winstone, N. E. (2017). Pedagogic Frailty: Opportunities and challenges. In I. M. 
  • Kinchin and N.E. Winstone (Eds.), Pedagogic Frailty and Resilience in the University (pp. 211-225). Rotterdam: Sense.
  • Kinchin, I. M., & Winstone, N. E. (2018). Exploring pedagogic frailty in practice. In I. M. Kinchin & N. E. Winstone (Eds.), Exploring pedagogic frailty and resilience: Case studies of academic narrative (pp. 1-15). Leiden: Brill.
  • Kinchin, I.M., Hosein, A., Medland, E., Lygo-Baker, S., Warburton, S., Gash, D., Rees, R., Loughlin, C., Woods, R., Price, S. and Usherwood, S. (2017) Mapping the development of a new MA programme in higher education: Comparing private perceptions of a public endeavour. Journal of Further and Higher Education, 41 (2): 155-171.
  • Lygo-Baker, S., Kinchin, I., & Winstone, N. E. (Eds.) (2019). Engaging Student Voices in Higher Education: Diverse Perspectives and Expectations in Partnership. Palgrave.
  • Medland, E., Watermeyer, R., Hosein, A., Kinchin, I.M., and Lygo-Baker, S. (Eds.) (2018) Pedagogical Peculiarities: Conversations at the Edge of University Teaching and Learning. Rotterdam, Sense Publishers.
  • Murtonen, M., & Balloo, K. (Eds.). (2019). Redefining scientific thinking for higher education: Higher-order thinking, evidence-based reasoning and research skills. Cham: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Okupe, A., & Medland, E. (2019) Pluralising student voices: Evaluating teaching practice.  In N. Winstone, I.M. Kinchin, S. Lygo-Baker & S. Warburton’s (eds.) Engaging Student Voices in Higher Education: Diverse Perspectives and Expectations in Partnership.  London: Palgrave.
  • Tenenbaum, H. R., Winstone, N., Avery, R., & Leman, P. (2020). How effective is peer interaction in facilitating learning? A meta-analysis. Journal of Educational Psychology, advance online publication.
  • Winstone, N. E., & Avery, R. A. (2018). Enhancing Psychology students’ employability through ‘Practice to theory’ learning following a Professional Training Year. In D. Morley (Ed.), Enhancing employability in higher education through work based learning (pp. 213-233). London: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Winstone, N. E., Gravett, K., Balloo, K., Jacobs, D., & Keen, H. (2020). Who stands to benefit? Wellbeing, belonging, and challenges to equity in engagement in extra-curricular activities. Active Learning in Higher Education, advance online publication. 
  • Winstone, N. E., & Hulme, J. (2019). ‘Duck to water’ or ‘fish out of water’? Diversity in the experience of negotiating the transition to university. In S. Lygo-Baker, I. M. Kinchin, & N. E. Winstone (Eds.), Engaging student voices in higher education: Diverse perspectives and expectations in partnership (pp. 159-174). London: Palgrave.
  • Winstone, N. E., & Kinchin, I. M. (2017). Teaching sensitive topics: Psychological literacy as an antidote to pedagogic frailty. Psychology Teaching Review, 23(1), 15-29.
  • Winstone, N., & Moore, D. (2017). Sometimes fish, sometimes fowl? Liminality, identity work and identity malleability in Graduate Teaching Assistants. Innovations in Education and Teaching International, 54(5), 494-502. 
  • Bourne, J., & Winstone, N. E. (in press). Empowering students’ voices: The use of activity-oriented focus groups in higher education research. International Journal of Research and Method in Education.
  • Gravett, K. (2019). Story completion: Storying as a method of meaning-making and discursive discovery. International Journal of Qualitative Methods, advance online publication.
  • Gravett, K., Medland, E., & Winstone, N. E. (2019). Engaging students as co-designers in educational innovation. In S. Lygo-Baker, I. M. Kinchin, & N. E. Winstone (Eds.), Engaging student voices in higher education: Diverse perspectives and expectations in partnership (pp. 297-313). London: Palgrave.
  • Heron, M., Kinchin, I., & Medland, E. (2018). Interview talk and the co-construction of concept maps. Educational Research60(4), 373-389.
  • Kinchin, I. M. and Gravett, K. (2020). Concept mapping in the age of Deleuze: Fresh perspectives and new challenges. Education Sciences10(3), 82. 
  • Winstone, N., Millward, L., Huntington, C., Goldsack, L., & Kyrou, E. (2014). Eliciting rich dialogue through the use of activity-oriented interviews with autistic young people. Childhood, 21(2), 190-206

Blog posts and media articles

Tools and resources

The Developing Engagement with Feedback Toolkit (DEFT)

Transforming Assessment in Higher Education Case Study Series (HEA)

The Developing Engagement with Feedback Toolkit 16-19

Feedback Opportunities in Online Learning - Infographic

(169.2 KB .PDF)
DOWNLOAD