Professional development

The aim of the Department of Higher Education is to support and promote excellence in learning and teaching at the University.

Workshops

Our interactive learning and teaching workshops provide overviews of key areas based on exploring the interrelationship between learning and teaching. They are designed to complement the programmes offered by the Department of Higher Education, which lead to qualifications in Learning and Teaching.

The workshops link together and can be taken in any combination or can standalone. They provide ideas for consideration, provoke discussion around personal practice and experience, and give you opportunities to develop new approaches based on previously effective strategies.

  • Places are limited and are offered on a first come, first served basis.
  • All workshops take place here at the University.
  • For more information on our workshops, please contact Laura Barnett
  • Book your place on a workshop.

January 2019

Pedagogic gains from reading lists
Tuesday 22 January 1pm - 3pm

This workshop aims to introduce and encourage the use of the reading list as a learning and teaching tool by firstly, developing a practical understanding of, and engagement with, online reading lists. Secondly, by examining the potential of the reading lists as a pedagogical tool to promote information and digital literacy. Lastly, by understanding the use of reading lists within the learning environment.

Registration

Assessment and Feedback
Wednesday 23 January 10am - 12pm

This workshop considers some of the fundamental aspects of setting appropriate assessment and how feedback affects our relationship with learners. It offers some suggestions to enhance both our assessment practice and provision of feedback.

Registration

Creative and innovative approaches to enhancing student engagement in their learning using Lego Serious Play (LSP) and /or Playdoh
Wednesday 23 January 1pm - 3pm

This active workshop will briefly showcase some examples of our work with 3D modelling using Lego and Playdoh within various disciplines (including Nursing, Engineering, Veterinary Anatomy) and departments at all levels of study. A hands-on opportunity to explore the possibilities for modelling within your own subject areas and reflect upon the potential for enhancing student learning development and engagement.

Registration

Introduction to Teaching and Learning
Thursday 24 January 1pm - 3pm

Participants explore “helpful” and “unhelpful” teaching characteristics and how these may be affected by the current climate in higher education. The workshop identifies physical, socio psychological and cultural factors that may influence the engagement of students in their learning. Participants gain a brief overview of adult learning theory and have the opportunity to apply this by generating a teaching method and assessment for a learning case study.

Registration

Audio for Education
Tuesday 29 January 1pm - 3pm

This hand-on workshop is designed for tutors who would like to make effective and engaging use of audio to help students learn. During the session you’ll identify and discuss the educational benefits and applications of audio, create a simple voice message for your students that can be uploaded to SurreyLearn, and learn how to record and produce audio based learning activities using the freely available “Audacity” sound editing tool.

Registration

Mini microteaching
Thursday 31 January 1pm - 3pm

This workshop is aimed at participants with little or no teaching experience It offers the opportunity to get some hands on experience of teaching accompanied by some immediate feedback As a participant of this workshop you will be expected to teach a small group of peers (your fellow microteaching colleagues) for 5 minutes on a topic of your choice that you have prepared in advance. This will be followed by 5 minutes of feedback from peers and the workshop facilitator on the session taught.

Registration

February 2019

Academic integrity, plagiarism and referencing practices
Friday 1 February 10am - 12pm

This workshop will explore concepts of academic integrity and plagiarism within higher education, and the impact of these concepts upon students. It will explore some definitions, as well as current practice and literature examining these issues. During the workshop you will have the opportunity to investigate your own perceptions of academic integrity and plagiarism, discover how research on the topic can inform our practice, and work with others to generate strategies for addressing the issue.

Registration

Assessment and Feedback
Monday 4 February 1pm - 3pm

This workshop considers some of the fundamental aspects of setting appropriate assessment and how feedback affects our relationship with learners. It offers some suggestions to enhance both our assessment practice and provision of feedback.

Registration

Observing and Being Observed
Tuesday 5 February 10am - 12pm

Within an institutional peer observation scheme, it is important that colleagues are able to gain the maximum benefit from the process of both being observed and observing others in order to support their professional development as a university teacher. This session will be run by a member of the Department of Higher Education, and will explore the processes of observation and feedback. The session leader and participants will share experiences of observation and feedback and discuss ways of maximising the benefits of engagement. 

Registration

Learning from others
Tuesday 5 February 1pm - 3pm

What can we learn from those outside higher education about how to teach? This session will focus on a range of interactions with people outside of higher education to consider what we can learn and adapt as a result. These include work done with a stand-up comedian, preachers, script writers and singing coaches.

Registration

Introduction to Concept Mapping
Wednesday 6 February 10am - 12pm

Concept mapping (as developed by Joe Novak) has been shown to be a versatile tool that can be used in any discipline as a study-aid, a revision tool and a research tool. It is a graphic technique that requires the ‘mapper’ to make links between ideas explicit and so reveal their quality of understanding. The process of mapping is very simple to learn, but takes considerable mental effort to produce excellent maps. It can be used in class or as a ‘homework activity’ and can also be used to stimulate high level dialogue about a subject. Concept maps can be used to diagnose student misconceptions and/or reveal the variety of perspectives that may be hidden within a cohort of students. The session will take you through the steps of producing a map and then go on to consider applications that you may explore in your teaching.

Registration

Supporting English as Second Language (ESL) learners in lectures and seminars
Wednesday 6 February 1pm - 3pm

The University of Surrey has students from over 120 countries. Many of the students in your lecture or seminar may have English as their second language. This means that they may find both the language and norms of practice challenging and unfamiliar. Lecturers also may find it daunting to cater for a diverse group of students. This workshop will first challenge some of the myths of the ESL student, and examine areas of teaching and learning students and lecturers find difficult to manage. We will also consider the benefits of teaching diverse groups of students, and share best practice for ensuring that our lectures and seminars provide both linguistic and other support for ESL students. 

Registration

Evaluating Teaching Practice
Thursday 7 February 10am - 12pm

This workshop provides an overview of what it means to evaluate your teaching practice and some of the methods, and sources of feedback that can be drawn upon to enhance your practice through the identification of areas for development.

Registration

Introduction to Technology Enhanced Learning
Thursday 7 February 1pm - 3pm

This interactive workshop explores ways in which technology can support and enhance learning and teaching. During the session you’ll experience a range of technologies and examine their use in both face-to-face and online learning environments, giving you the opportunity to reflect on how such technologies can benefit your own teaching practice.

Before the workshop you’ll complete a short online activity (15-20 minutes) aimed at capturing your initial thoughts and experience of technology enhanced learning, which will form the basis of discussions at the start of the workshop.

Registration

Introduction to Learning and Teaching
Friday 8 February 10am - 12pm

Participants explore “helpful” and “unhelpful” teaching characteristics and how these may be affected by the current climate in higher education. The workshop identifies physical, socio psychological and cultural factors that may influence the engagement of students in their learning. Participants gain a brief overview of adult learning theory and have the opportunity to apply this by generating a teaching method and assessment for a learning case study.

Registration

Introduction to Technology Enhanced Learning
Monday 18 February 1pm - 3pm

This interactive workshop explores ways in which technology can support and enhance learning and teaching. During the session you’ll experience a range of technologies and examine their use in both face-to-face and online learning environments, giving you the opportunity to reflect on how such technologies can benefit your own teaching practice.

Before the workshop you’ll complete a short online activity (15-20 minutes) aimed at capturing your initial thoughts and experience of technology enhanced learning, which will form the basis of discussions at the start of the workshop.

Registration

Assessment and Feedback
Tuesday 19 February 10am - 12pm

The University of Surrey has students from over 120 countries. Many of the students in your lecture or seminar may have English as their second language. This means that they may find both the language and norms of practice challenging and unfamiliar. Lecturers also may find it daunting to cater for a diverse group of students. This workshop will first challenge some of the myths of the ESL student, and examine areas of teaching and learning students and lecturers find difficult to manage. We will also consider the benefits of teaching diverse groups of students, and share best practice for ensuring that our lectures and seminars provide both linguistic and other support for ESL students. 

Registration

Creating captured content learning based activities
Tuesday 19 February 1pm - 3pm

This hands-on workshop will guide you through the design and creation of captured content (educational video recordings) based learning activities for your students. During the session you’ll learn how to record, edit and publish captured content using the Panopto audio-video production tool, and participate in a design process enabling you to create effective and engaging captured content-based activities to support student learning.

Before the workshop you’ll complete a short pre-workshop activity (15-20 minutes) where you explore the benefits and applications of captured content for learning and teaching and identify one of your own learning and teaching challenge that can be addressed with the help of a captured content-based activity.

Registration

Introduction to Learning and Teaching
Wednesday 20 February 10am - 12pm

Participants explore “helpful” and “unhelpful” teaching characteristics and how these may be affected by the current climate in higher education. The workshop identifies physical, socio psychological and cultural factors that may influence the engagement of students in their learning. Participants gain a brief overview of adult learning theory and have the opportunity to apply this by generating a teaching method and assessment for a learning case study. 

Registration

Mini microteaching
Wednesday 20 February 1pm - 3pm

This workshop is aimed at participants with little or no teaching experience.  It offers the opportunity to get some hands on experience of teaching accompanied by some immediate feedback.  As a participant of this workshop you will be expected to teach a small group of peers (your fellow microteaching colleagues) for 5 minutes on a topic of your choice that you have prepared in advance.   This will be followed by 5 minutes of feedback from peers and the workshop facilitator on the session taught.

Registration

Engendering academic talk in seminars
Thursday 21 February 10am - 12pm

Seminars are a distinctive feature of HE education and are synonymous with discussion and debate. However, research into classroom talk has highlighted the link between quality of talk and depth of understanding. This workshop will present features of academic talk (as opposed to conversation) in the context of empirical research and the HE context. Participants will explore different strategies for promoting and supporting more academic talk in seminar discussions.

Registration

Developing Undergraduate Students as Researchers
Friday 22 February 10am - 12pm

‘Undergraduate research is the pedagogy for the 21st century’ (Council on Undergraduate Research and National Conference on Undergraduate Research, 2005). This workshop focuses on research- and inquiry-based learning and the forms they can take at undergraduate level. We will discuss different conceptual frameworks of ‘research-based learning’ and invite participants to reflect on their undergraduate teaching in relation to these models.  We will also explore ways of developing and promoting undergraduate research activity within new and existing modules/programmes.

Registration

Using Short Writing Tasks to Enhance Students’ Disciplinary Thinking

Tuesday 26 February 1pm-3pm

‘Students should not only learn to write but write to learn’ (Bazerman and Russell, 1994, p. xiv). This session will explore how writing can be used for learning, thinking and developing disciplinary expertise. It will specifically focus on how short writing tasks can be used to stimulate students’ disciplinary thinking and enhance their engagement with module content. Along with exploring the underlying theory and examples of good practice from the sector, this workshop will offer the attendees an opportunity to design short writing activities for their module/s and think about how such activities can be systematically integrated into module and programme delivery. 

Registration

An Introduction to Pedagogic Research
Wednesday 27 February 1pm - 3pm

This workshop will introduce participants to key approaches and common methods within the field of educational and pedagogic research. Through a series of case studies, we will illustrate how to develop theory-driven research questions, design appropriate methods of data collection, seek ethical approval, and collect and analyse data. We will also discuss the ‘students as partners’ approach to pedagogic research, and provide guidance on publication and dissemination channels.

Registration

March 2019

Creating captured content learning based activities
Friday 1 March 10am - 12pm

This hands-on workshop will guide you through the design and creation of captured content (educational video recordings) based learning activities for your students. During the session you’ll learn how to record, edit and publish captured content using the Panopto audio-video production tool, and participate in a design process enabling you to create effective and engaging captured content-based activities to support student learning.

Before the workshop you’ll complete a short pre-workshop activity (15-20 minutes) where you explore the benefits and applications of captured content for learning and teaching and identify one of your own learning and teaching challenge that can be addressed with the help of a captured content-based activity.

Registration

Building Resilience: A forum for sharing current research and experiences of student resilience
Monday 4 March 1pm - 3pm

While defining resilience is recognised as complex with recent research highlighting the disparity of interpretations, there is however, a common appreciation of the wide range of contributory factors impacting on students’ resilience within the Higher Education sector’ (Anthoney, Stead and Turney, 2017).

This session will involve 3 elements: a presentation on our recent research at Surrey, a LEGO® SERIOUS PLAY® activity and a discussion forum whereby participants can share their own experiences and understandings of resilience.

Registration

Creative and innovative approaches to enhancing student engagement in their learning using Lego Serious Play (LSP) and /or Playdoh
Tuesday 5 March 10am - 12pm

This active workshop will briefly showcase some examples of our work with 3D modelling using Lego and Playdoh within various disciplines (including Nursing, Engineering, Veterinary Anatomy) and departments at all levels of study. A hands-on opportunity to explore the possibilities for modelling within your own subject areas and reflect upon the potential for enhancing student learning development and engagement.

Registration

Student engagement in lectures and seminars
Wednesday 6 March 1pm - 3pm

Participants have the opportunity to create their own strategies for engagement involving students before formal teaching begins (“flipped classroom”), in the learning space and once the formal teaching session has ended. The workshop will draw on best practice to give students very practical advice on the importance and skill of keeping students actively engaged with their learning.

Registration

Observing and being observed
Thursday 7 March 10am - 12pm

Within an institutional peer observation scheme, it is important that colleagues are able to gain the maximum benefit from the process of both being observed and observing others in order to support their professional development as a university teacher. This session will be run by a member of the Department of Higher Education, and will explore the processes of observation and feedback. The session leader and participants will share experiences of observation and feedback and discuss ways of maximising the benefits of engagement.

Registration

Using SURJ as a resource for helping students communicate subject knowledge
Monday 11 March 1pm - 3pm

It has been reported in the literature that there is a gap between staff and student expectations around good academic writing (e.g. Lea & Street, 1998; Lillis & Turner, 2001; Hardy & Clughen, 2012). Having a tacit understanding of the conventions of good writing in their discipline, academic staff may not always realise that they have this rhetorical knowledge and may struggle to explain it to their students (Turner, 2011).This Interactive workshop has two aims: 1) to help the participants articulate their extensive tacit knowledge of the features of good writing and 2) to explore ways in which the Surrey Undergraduate Research Journal (SURJ) articles can be used to develop student writing in their discipline.

Registration

Introduction to Teaching and Learning
Tuesday 12 March 10am - 12pm

Participants explore “helpful” and “unhelpful” teaching characteristics and how these may be affected by the current climate in higher education. The workshop identifies physical, socio psychological and cultural factors that may influence the engagement of students in their learning. Participants gain a brief overview of adult learning theory and have the opportunity to apply this by generating a teaching method and assessment for a learning case study.

Registration

Assessment and Feedback
Thursday 14 March 10am - 12pm

This workshop considers some of the fundamental aspects of setting appropriate assessment and how feedback affects our relationship with learners. It offers some suggestions to enhance both our assessment practice and provision of feedback.

Registration

Differentiation in learning
Thursday 14 March 1pm - 3pm

This workshop considers the concept of differentiation in learning. It will introduce participants to the idea and how this is used in school education and how we can use the approaches involved to explore our own teaching sessions and how we plan and deliver these.

Registration

Designing educational escape rooms for HE
Tuesday 19 March 1pm – 3pm

Escape rooms offer immersive problem-solving experiences that is becoming an increasingly popular recreational activity. In recent years, the principles underpinning escape rooms have been developed into innovative pedagogies in educational contexts to engage learners in developing skills such as problem-solving, creative thinking and group-work skills. This session will firstly introduce participants to the pedagogy underpinning educational escape rooms drawing on the works of Andrew Walsh (2017). Secondly, participants will have the opportunity to solve puzzles to gain insight and experience of educational escape rooms. Lastly, we will explore how escape rooms can be applied in participants’ own teaching contexts and how they can support student experience and engagement.

Registration

Developing your Pedagogic Research Proposal
Wednesday 20 March 10am – 12pm

This workshop is aimed at those who have an idea of a project they wish to pursue, and will involve working with members of the Department of Higher Education to shape the idea into a sound proposal and set project milestones

Registration

Introduction to concept mapping
Thursday 21 March 10am - 12pm

Concept mapping (as developed by Joe Novak) has been shown to be a versatile tool that can be used in any discipline as a study-aid, a revision tool and a research tool. It is a graphic technique that requires the ‘mapper’ to make links between ideas explicit and so reveal their quality of understanding. The process of mapping is very simple to learn, but takes considerable mental effort to produce excellent maps. It can be used in class or as a ‘homework activity’ and can also be used to stimulate high level dialogue about a subject. Concept maps can be used to diagnose student misconceptions and/or reveal the variety of perspectives that may be hidden within a cohort of students. The session will take you through the steps of producing a map and then go on to consider applications that you may explore in your teaching.

Registration

Introduction to Pedagogic Frailty
Thursday 21 March 1pm – 3pm

The pedagogic frailty model has been developed in Surrey as a framework to support teacher development. It considers some of the key components that influence teaching and that in certain circumstances can act to restrict innovative practice. The four key factors are 1) the values that drive teaching 2) the link between teaching the subject and ‘doing’ the subject 3) the relationship between teaching and research, and 4) the regulations imposed upon teaching. Managing the relationships between these factors are key in avoiding frailty and developing a more resilient perspective on teaching development. Participants will be encouraged to reflect on their teaching and map their own profile to identify areas that might benefit from further reflection on practice. Participants attending this session are recommended to have already attended ‘Introduction to Concept Mapping’.

Registration

Poems, pictures and pedagogic frailty
Friday 22 March 10am - 12pm

After a quick introduction to the model of pedagogic frailty (see previous CPD session on pedagogic frailty for a detailed background), participants will be asked to reflect on an aspect of their own teaching context and explore their feelings and emotions about it by writing a poem. You will be asked to share your poetry in class and revise/edit your poems with your peers. Similarly, participants will be asked to produce a drawing to represent an aspect of their own frailty or resilience as a teacher. These artefacts will be discussed and emerging ideas will be explored within the group. Participants will be invited to offer their poems and drawings to be included in a publication to be submitted to a research journal - to which they will be invited as co-authors. Participants do not need to be accomplished poets or artists, but must be willing to share and discuss ideas within the group.

Registration

Students as ‘informed’ learners: enhancing student engagement with literature searching
Tuesday 26 March 1pm - 3pm

Based in the concept of information literacy and related research on informed learning (Australia) and the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education using threshold concepts (USA), this session will examine how consideration of literature searching requirements for assignments can enhance student learning and engagement helping them to develop a subject knowledge base. The session will highlight thinking in relation to information use by reviewing current frameworks and approaches to see how these can be used to develop informed information seeking behaviours applicable not only in the context of subject but for wider application such as workplace settings.  The session will involve a creative learning element as a means of highlighting the processes students undertake when information seeking and the potential challenges encountered.

Registration

Webinars

Teaching and Learning Conversations (TLC) brings together colleagues from different disciplines, institutions and countries to discuss current topics in learning and teaching and share best practice.

TLC webinars happen monthly:

  • They take place on the last Tuesday of each month between 12 and 1pm.
  • Please access the webinar room approximately 30 minutes in advance of the scheduled start time to test the technology. 
  • A headset is required to participate fully in the webinar.
  • Participants will be able to take an active role in the webinars by using audio, video, text and the whiteboard feature creatively.

Details of the programme, including links to recordings of past webinars and details of future webinars are available online. Please feel free to share the link to the TLC programme and individual webinars with others who might also be interested.

Accessing the webinars

  • Go to the TLC webinar room.
  • To login, enter as a guest and add your name.
  • When you have entered the webinar room, start the Audio setup wizard under 'Meeting' at the top left to check your headset.

For more information on Teaching and Learning Conversations, contact Dr Simon Lygo-Baker.

Quick-start guides

Review and develop your teaching practice with our quick-start guides. 

The guides address key issues of concern to students and provide impulses for reviewing and developing your teaching practice. Topics include:

  • Alignment of what we teach and assess
  • Clear success criteria
  • Helpful feedback
  • Using SurreyLearn

Download the full list of quick-start guides below.

Following on from the guides, you can build on your understanding by: