Department of Mechanical Engineering Sciences

Professional development

Our MSc in Advanced Materials is structured in a modular format, meaning that each module is complete within itself and available as a short course.

Such courses are ideal for delegates seeking experience in specific subjects for professional development and highly tailored to industry requirements in the related domains.

These short courses have been approved for "Professional Development" by IOM3 (Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining).

Course calendar

Academic year 2017-18

Short courses are carefully constructed to form modular components of the MSc in Advanced Materials. Each course is complete in itself and can also be undertaken by delegates seeking experience in specific subjects for professional development.

2-6 October 2017

Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering

2-6 October 2017

This course is for anyone wanting to acquire an overview of materials science and engineering. It is taught at postgraduate level so will be of maximum benefit to delegates with industrial experience of materials and/or degree-qualified engineers, chemists and physicists who interact with materials scientists/engineers or who are moving into the materials area. There will be plenty of opportunities for discussion with lecturers and other delegates.

Provisional Syllabus

Please note that we reserve the right to alter the syllabus. Any major changes will be notified to delegates before the course starts.

Overview of the Course

The lecture content is grouped into four blocks dealing with fundamental principles, specific classes of materials, characterisation techniques and application related topics, as outlined below:

  • Crystal Structures
  • Defects
  • Fundamental Properties of Materials
  • Functional Properties of Materials
  • Structural Properties of Materials
  • Surfaces and Interfaces
  • Phase Equilibria
  • Steels
  • Light Metals
  • Introduction to Engineering Ceramics
  • Composites
  • Structure and Properties of Polymers
  • Processability of Polymers
  • Characterisation of Materials
  • Corrosion
  • Surface Engineering
  • Joining
  • Materials Selection
  • Sustainability

The course will provide:

  • a systematic understanding of the different classes of engineering materials, their key properties and their principal application areas
  • a knowledge of the major techniques used to characterise materials and evaluate their properties, including the quantitative treatment of data where appropriate.
  • an appreciation of the importance of processing-microstructure-property relationships through the use of illustrative examples

Learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

  • describe and account for the structure, processing routes and key properties of the main classes of materials
  • explain how materials are characterised
  • construct processing-structure-property relationships for existing and potential materials.
  • assess the suitability of a material for a given purpose, using quantitative analyses where appropriate

Required reading

Extensive course notes are supplied.

The recommended reading books are:

Ashby MF and Jones DRH,
Engineering Materials 1: An Introduction to their Properties and Applications,
4th ed, Butterworth-Heinemann, 2011. (ISBN 978-0080966659)

Ashby MF and Jones DRH,
Engineering Materials 2: An Introduction to Microstructures, Processing and Design,
4th ed, Butterworth-Heinemann, 2012. (ISBN 978-0080966687)

Recommended background reading
The library has a wide range of textbooks that support the Materials Science and Engineering curriculum, including:

Callister WD Jr,
Materials Science and Engineering: An Introduction,
9th ed, John Wiley & Sons, 2013 (ISBN 978-1118324578)
Callister, WD and Rethwisch, DG
Materials Science and Engineering
9th ed, John Wiley & Sons, 2014 (ISBN 978-1118319222)

Course Directors

The joint course directors are Dr Mark Whiting and Professor Robert Dorey, who is a Chartered Engineer & Scientist. They will be joined by colleagues from across the University of Surrey’s materials activity.

13-17 November 2017

Introduction to Composite Materials

13-17 November 2017

The Course

This is a five day intensive course covering the essential concepts and practices of Composite Materials. The course will benefit those with no previous formal introduction to the science of composites: no prior knowledge or experience is assumed. All topics will be introduced from first principles and the emphasis will be on developing an understanding of concepts rather than a detailed review of current practice. The course will include lectures, exercise classes and laboratory sessions.

Provisional Syllabus

Please note that we reserve the right to alter the syllabus. Any major changes will be notified to delegates before the course starts.

Who Should Attend

Those wanting an in-depth introduction to composite materials. The rapid increase in the use of composites means that many people are getting involved with composite materials and finding they need a sound introduction to the subject. It will be suitable for graduates in science or engineering who are entering the field and for technicians engaged in composites technology but who want to understand the science. The course is also suitable for sales and managerial personnel who have a scientific background and are seeking an appreciation of the principles of composite materials.

Prerequisites

No prior knowledge or experience of composites is assumed. The course will be taught at graduate level. It should be understood readily by graduates in science or engineering and by technicians of BTEC or equivalent status. The mathematical demands of the course are not great but some understanding of the calculus and the principles of matrix algebra would be advantageous.

Module Aims

This course aims to:

  • Provide a systematic understanding of the fundamental science and technology of engineering composite materials
  • Study the often complex interactions between the matrix, reinforcement and interface in composite materials, leading to an understanding of the relationships between reinforcement geometry and composite properties
  • Provide the principles behind important design considerations, processing technologies and test methods

Learning Outcomes

  • Upon successful completion of the course delegates will be able to: describe and comment on the basic mechanical behaviour of composite materials and make sound judgements on the likely behaviour of new combinations of materials
  • Support the choices made for using certain types of composites in certain applications with reference to composite properties
  • Demonstrate a practical understanding of composite properties and fabrication techniques, and to be able to make realistic suggestions for the evaluation of composite behaviour, where appropriate

Module Content

The course will include lectures, exercise classes and laboratory sessions.

  • Introduction
  • Basic mechanics of reinforcement
  • Laminate theory
  • Fracture processes and toughness of composites
  • Reinforcements and matrices
  • Interfaces in composites materials
  • Manufacturing processes
  • Modelling of the processing of fibre composites
  • Failure criteria
  • Introduction to design
  • Notches and joints - the effect of stress concentrations
  • Fatigue
  • Woven composites – structure and behaviour
  • Impact and environmental effects

Required reading
Extensive course notes are provided.
Recommended background reading:
The library has a wide range of textbooks that support this module, including:

Hull D and Clyne TW, An Introduction to Composite Materials, 2nd ed, Cambridge University Press, 1996.
Agarwal BD and Broutman LJ, Analysis and Performance of Fiber Composites, Wiley, 1980.
(both of which provide a good introduction to the topic.)
Course Directors

The Course Director and Co-Director are Professors Stephen Ogin and Paul Smith.

4-8 December 2017

Characterisation of Advanced Materials

4-8 December 2017

The aim of this five-day course is to introduce the principles of the most popular materials characterisation methods based on microscopy, chemical, physical and structural analysis and thermal techniques. Consideration will also be given to the analysis of particulate materials and coatings. The basic principles used for the physical characterisation of materials will be outlined; microscopy by light, electrons and scanned probes will be introduced; and the readily available bulk characterisation methods such as diffraction, X-ray analysis and vibrational spectroscopies will be described. Surface analysis by electron and ion spectroscopies will also form an important part of the course. Particular emphasis will be paid to the use of a variety of methods in multi-technique approaches for the characterisation of advanced materials.

The course will be staffed by lecturers with considerable experience in materials characterisation. The programme will comprise lectures, laboratory demonstrations, computer simulations and exercise classes with the course tutors

Provisional Syllabus

Please note that we reserve the right to alter the syllabus. Any major changes will be notified to delegates before the course starts.

Module Aims

This course aims to:

  • Provide a systematic understanding of the principles, equipment and practices of the most popular materials characterisation methods based on microscopy, chemical, physical and structural analysis and thermal techniques.
  • Equip students with the knowledge of a broad range of characterisation techniques, such that they clearly understand the capabilities of such methods and their role in completing the process-structure-property relationship

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the module, students should:

  • Have an understanding of the principles and a knowledge of the capabilities and limitations of the different types of analysis covered in the course
  • Be able to recommend appropriate methods for particular problems and have a good understanding of the data obtained

Module Content

The methods to be included are X-ray analysis in the electron microscope by energy dispersive and wavelength dispersive spectrometry (EDS and WDS); surface analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES); together with the ion beam techniques of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). Structure determination by X-ray and electron diffraction (XRD and ED) will also be included.

The module is directed at scientists and engineers who require a grounding in these methods for trouble-shooting investigations or longer term research projects. The basic principles used for the physical characterisation of materials will be outlined; microscopy by light, electrons and scanned probes will be introduced and the readily available bulk characterisation methods such as diffraction, X-ray analysis and vibrational spectroscopies will be described. Surface analysis be electron and ion spectroscopies will also form and important part of the course. Particular emphasis will be paid to the use of a variety of methods in multi-technique approaches for the characterisation of advanced materials.                  

  • Thermal Analysis                                                                     
  • X-Ray Diffraction                                                                        
  • Infra Red Spectroscopy
  • Light Microscopy
  • Image Acquisition Analysis and Processing
  • Electron Interactions
  • Scanning Electron Microscopy  
  • The Use of Focussed Ion Beam (FIB)
  • X-ray Analysis in Electron Microscopy
  • Electron Back Scatter Diffraction
  • Transmission Electron Microscopy: Imaging and Diffraction
  • Scanning Probe Microscopies
  • Electron Energy Loss Analysis in the TEM/STEM
  • Auger Electron Spectroscopy and Microscopy
  • Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry
  • X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy
  • Ion Beam Analysis: RBS and PIXE

Recommended reading:

'Physical Methods for Materials Characterisation' P.E.J.Flewitt, R.K.Wild Institute of Physics Publishing Ltd., 2nd edition, 2003. ISBN 978-0750308083

Extensive course notes are supplied. Due to the wide ranging nature of the subject matter, supporting texts are discussed as part of the course.

Course Directors

The Course Director and Co-Director are Professors John F Watts and Mark J Whiting.

29 January-2 February 2018

Introduction to Physical Metallurgy

29 January-2 February 2018

The Course

The course aims to provide a general introduction to the field of Physical Metallurgy. The course covers equilibrium phase diagrams, transformation diagrams, diffusion, liquid to solid transformations, ferrous and non-ferrous materials, cold work, recovery and recrystallisation.

Provisional Syllabus

Please note that we reserve the right to alter the syllabus. Any major changes will be notified to delegates before the course starts.

Module Overview

The module provides a systematic overview of the major principles of physical metallurgy. Students successfully completing the module will have a critical awareness of how these principles relate to current issues in exploiting structural alloys in engineering applications.

Module Aims

This module aims to explore:

  • The centrality of the concepts of thermodynamics and kinetics in physical metallurgy and phase transformations.
  • Binary equilibrium phase diagrams as a tool in understanding the thermodynamics of alloy systems.
  • The use of transformation (isothermal and continuous cooling) diagrams as a tool in following (i) the kinetics of phase transformations and (ii) the development of alloy microstructure.
  • The role of diffusion in the kinetics of phase transformations.
  • The principles of thermodynamics and kinetics, and their application, to a representative selection of real alloy systems.
  • The nature of defects in metallic systems and their role in determining engineering properties.
  • The concept of microstructure and its relationship to processing and properties of alloys.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the module, students should be able to

  • Show a systematic understanding of the role that thermodynamics and kinetics play in phase transformations.
  • Evaluate critically the relevance of phase diagrams, isothermal transformation diagrams and continuous cooling transformation diagrams to understanding real alloys and their microstructure.
  • Display a critical awareness of the relevance of key areas, e.g. diffusion, defects, transformation type, to current problems in designing, processing and exploiting real alloys.
  • Show a systematic understanding of the complex interplay between microstructure, processing and engineering properties in metallic materials.

Module Content

  • The thermodynamic basis of phase diagrams.
  • Binary equilbrium phase diagrams and their use in predicting alloy constitution and microstructure.
  • Isothermal and continuous cooling transformation diagrams and their use in predicting microstructure.
  • Characterisation of microstructures.
  • Solid-state diffusion.
  • The liquid to solid transformation.
  • Precipitation in the solid state.
  • The classification of phase transformations as diffusional and displacive.
  • The pearlitic, bainitic and martensitic transformations.
  • Selected Steels
  • High strength aluminium alloys
  • Titanium and its alloys
  • Microstructure, processing and property relationships (with an emphasis on ambient temperature strengthening mechanisms).
  • Point, line and planar lattice defects.
  • Micro and macro defects.
  • Cold work, recovery, recrystallisation and grain growth.
  • The role of dislocations in strengthening mechanisms.

Required reading
Extensive course notes are supplied.

The books is:

Smallman, RE and Ngan, AHW,
Physical Metallurgy and Advanced Materials, 8th ed, Butterworth-Heinemann, 2013. (ISBN 978-0080982045)

Recommended background reading
The library has a wide range of textbooks that support the Introduction to Physical Metallurgy curriculum, including:

Ashby MF and Jones DRH,
Engineering Materials 2: An Introduction to Microstructures, Processing and Design,
4th ed, Butterworth-Heinemann, 2012 ( ISBN 978-0080966687)
Polmear I,
Light Alloys: From Traditional Alloys to Nanocrystals. Elsevier Limited; 4th ed (2005).  (ISBN 978-0750663717)
Porter DA, Easterling KE and Sherif M,
Phase Transformations in Metals and Alloys, 3rd ed, CRC Press, 2009. (ISBN 978-1420062106)

Course Director

The Course Director is Dr Mark Whiting.

19-23 February 2018

Polymers: Science, Engineering and Applications

19-23 February 2018

This intensive short course will be given over a period of five days and is designed to provide an analysis of the science and engineering of polymers, and an up-to-date appreciation of the development and application of polymers in engineering and other fields. The emphasis will be on the newer and more advanced materials. The first part of the course will consist of an overview of the underlying science of polymeric materials and will provide a useful introduction to those new to the field (or a refresher for those who have been in it for some time). This will lead in to a detailed discussion of mechanical and physical properties, processing of polymers, characterisation techniques, and development of different types of polymers including both common and advanced polymers. There will also be lectures on some of the more important newer materials for structural, optoelectronic and biomedical applications, and the course will conclude with a discussion of trends of polymer utilisation in leading industries.

Provisional Syllabus

Please note that we reserve the right to alter the syllabus. Any major changes will be notified to delegates before the course starts.

Who Should Attend?

This course is designed for scientists and technologists in the manufacturing industries, graduates undertaking research and development in academic institutions or research organisations and MSc students. It will serve as an introduction or an update. No specific previous qualifications will be assumed but the level is set to appeal to those of graduate status with some industrial experience. A basic understanding of the structure of polymers will be useful but detailed chemical and mathematical arguments will be avoided. By the conclusion of the course, delegates will have received a sound review of the basic principles of science and engineering of polymers and advanced polymeric materials, and have an overview of current developments relevant to most industrial requirements.

Module Aims

This course aims to:

  • Provide an up-to-date appreciation of the developments and applications of polymers in   
    engineering
  • Provide students with important background and conceptual on the structure and properties of
    polymers with the focus on:
    (i) recent developments in
    (a)        the chemical and physical structure
    (b)        processing
    (c)        and production of new classes of polymers
    that lead to a new range of properties or significant improvement of existing properties;
    (ii) novel applications for polymers or applications where the polymers have found recent expansion in novel areas due to their enhanced or novel properties.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the module, students will:

  • Have a knowledge of the properties, processing and applications of thermoplastics and thermosets, both bulk and specialised materials, latest developments and new or advanced applications for polymers,
  • Be able to use this knowledge in a critical manner to make justified choices of polymeric materials and processes, plan and design the product and manufacturing route for a given application

Module Content

  • Synthesis of Polymers
  • The Amorphous State
  • The Crystalline State
  • Mechanical Behaviour
  • Elastomers
  • Thermosets
  • Thermoplastics
  • Chemical Characterisation of Polymers
  • Physical Characterisation of Polymers
  • Processing of Plastics I & II
  • Toughening and Toughening Mechanisms in Polymers
  • Design with Polymers
  • Adhesives and Coatings
  • Polymer Blends and Alloys
  • Conjugated Polymers for Optoelectronic Applications
  • Degradation of polymers
  • Recycling of Polymers
  • Polymers in Microelectronics
  • Polymers in Automotive Applications

Recommended background reading
Extensive course notes are supplied.   

The library has a wide range of textbooks that support the Polymer curriculum, including:

Young RJ & Lovell PA, Introduction to Polymers, 3rd edition, Boca Raton 2011

Brazel, CS & Rosen, SL, Fundamental principles of polymeric materials,e-book, 3rd edition, Wiley, 2012

Pethrick, RA, Polymer science and technology for scientists and engineers, e-book, Whittles, 2010

Erman, Burak, The science and techology of rubber, e-book, 4th edition, Elsevier, 2013

Mittal, Vikas, High performance polymers and engineering plastics, e-book, Wiley, 2011
The Library has also a wide range of relevant journals with the latest research and developments, including Polymer, Polymer Science & Engineering, and Materials World.
Websites of interest include www.azom.com

Course Director

The Course Director is Dr Constantina Lekakou.

5-9 March 2018

Ceramics and Ceramic Coatings

5-9 March 2018

The Course

The course will provide a detailed consideration of the fundamentals and underpinning science of the processing and mechanical properties of engineering ceramics and ceramic coatings. Topics such as wear, thermo-mechanical behaviour and design will be addressed. Where appropriate, examples of actual materials and components will be used to illustrate these generic principles and new developments will be identified. The lecture content will be reinforced and enhanced through tutorial/exercise class sessions.

Provisional Syllabus

Please note that we reserve the right to alter the syllabus. Any major changes will be notified to delegates before the course starts.

Who Should Attend?

The course is designed for scientists and engineers seeking an understanding of engineering ceramics and ceramic coatings. It will be suitable for graduates with no or limited ceramic experience wishing to widen the scope of their knowledge. There are no formal prerequisites but some basic knowledge of materials science will be assumed.

Module Aims

This course aims to provide students/delegates with:

  • A systematic understanding of the techniques used to produce ceramics and ceramic coatings and the influence of these on the resulting microstructures
  • A detailed knowledge of the properties of ceramics and ceramic coatings, with specific reference to load-bearing and/or wear applications, and an understanding of how these properties are related to the processing routes and microstructures
  • An appreciation of the key application areas of ceramics and ceramic coatings

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

  • Describe and select appropriate processing conditions for a range of ceramic and ceramic coating materials
  • Compare and contrast the microstructural features that will result from particular processing routes
  • Understand the relationships between processing, microstructural development and properties in a range of ceramic materials in bulk and coating forms
  • Use statistical methods to predict the strength of a ceramic in a range of loading regimes and environments
  • Predict, qualitatively and semi-quantitatively, the fracture behaviour of a range of ceramics coating microstructures subject to simple mechanical loading, indentation, wear by hard particles and thermal stresses
  • Select, with the supporting rationale, the most appropriate materials for existing and potential applications

Course Content

• Overview of Materials and Application Areas
• Processing of Ceramics: Powders and Green Bodies
• Processing of Ceramics: Sintering
• Processing of Coatings: Physical Vapour Deposition Methods
• Thin Film Growth
• Thick Film Deposition
• Mechanical Properties of Ceramics and Coatings: An Introduction
• Mechanical Properties of Ceramics: Statistical Nature of Strength
• Thermo-Mechanical Behaviour
• Interfaces and Adhesion of Coatings
• Mechanical and Wear Test Methods
• New Developments in Wear Resistant Coatings
• Joining of Ceramics
• Designing with Ceramics

Recommended background reading

Barsoum Fundamentals of Ceramics
Institute of Physics, 2002 (second edition) ISBN: 978-0750309028
Brook Concise Encyclopedia of Advanced Ceramic Materials
Pergamon Press, 1991 ISBN: 0080347207
Carter and Norton CERAMIC MATERIALS Science and Engineering
Springer, 2007 ISBN-10: 0-387-46270-8
Chawla Ceramic Matrix Composites
Chapman & Hall, 1993; second edition available ISBN: 0412367408
Chiang, Birnie and Kingery PHYSICAL CERAMICS Principles for Ceramic Science and Engineering
John Wiley & Sons, 1997 ISBN: 0471598739
Davidge Mechanical Behaviour of Ceramics
Cambridge University Press, 1979 ISBN: 05212 19159
Green An Introduction to the Mechanical Properties of Ceramics
Cambridge University Press, 1998 ISBN: 05212 59913X
Lee & Rainforth CERAMIC MICROSTRUCTURES Property Control by Processing
Chapman & Hall, 1994 and 2002 ISBN: 0412431408

Course Directors

The Course Team are Professor Robert Dorey who is a Chartered Engineer and Scientist, and  Dr Mark Baker, who is a Chartered Scientist, both are Fellow's of the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining. They will be joined by colleagues from across the University of Surrey’s materials activity, as well as external experts, Professor Roger Morrell and Professor John Fernie.

19-23 March 2018

Materials under Stress: An Introduction to Fracture Mechanics and Fatigue

19-23 March 2018

Course Overview

This is an intensive course covering the basic concepts of fracture mechanics and fatigue, with emphasis on practical applications for metals, ceramics, polymers and composites. The course is suitable for those with no previous formal introduction to the science of fracture and no prior knowledge or experience is assumed. All topics will be introduced from first principles and the emphasis will be on developing an understanding of concepts of fracture mechanics rather than presenting a "state-of-the-art" review. Lectures will be given by experts in the field with experience of teaching this material to practising engineers and materials scientists on post-experience courses. Supervised examples classes will enable delegates to work on the solution of typical problems and discuss these with the lecturers.

Who Should Attend?

The course would be invaluable for scientists and technologists seeking an introduction to fracture mechanics. It will be suitable for recent graduates in science or engineering and others who are entering the field of fracture and fatigue.

Overview of the Course

• Introduction
• Basic stress analysis and mechanical properties
• Stress intensity factor and its use in fracture mechanics
• Fracture of ceramics
• Energetics approach to fracture
• Limitations of linear elastic fracture mechanics
• Aspects of fracture of metals
• Elastic/plastic fracture mechanics
• Fatigue 1 and 2
• Fatigue Assessment of welded structures
• Application of fracture mechanics to polymers and composites

Exercise classes

Three sessions will be devoted to exercise classes during the course, as well as laboratory sessions on the final two days. These classes will assist students in working through simple stress analysis problems and enable them to gain the confidence to handle concepts taught in the lecture programme.
Course attendees will find a simple scientific calculator a help!

The Course Director is Professor Paul Smith.

9-13 April 2018

The Science and Technology of Adhesive Bonding

9-13 April 2018

This is a one week postgraduate level course. The aim is to provide an intensive introduction to the basic principles, technology and applications of adhesive bonding. The course will be staffed by lecturers with considerable experience in structural adhesive bonding, drawn from both industry and academe. Each day will comprise lectures, laboratory demonstrations and classes with the course tutors. Attendees with specific problems will have ample opportunity to consult the lecturers. The number of registrants will be limited to ensure maximum benefit from both the practical classes and tutorial sessions.

Who should attend?

Those with a higher education qualification in science or engineering are likely to benefit most. This course is for you if your wish to gain a more complete understanding of the science and technology of the adhesive bonding process, or if you have responsibility for the design of systems involving adhesive joints, or for moving such designs through to production. You may be a materials scientist, a design engineer or production engineer or similar. No specific previous qualifications will be assumed but the level is set to appeal to those of graduate or equivalent status with some industrial experience.

Provisional lecture topics

  • Mechanisms of Adhesion
  • Wetting and spreading 1: An Introduction
  • Adhesive Formulation and the Chemistry of Adhesive Types
  • Methods for the Analysis of Interfacial Chemistry
    (SEM, EDX, TEM, XPS, SIMS, AES)
  • Mechanical Properties of Structural Adhesives
  • Design of Adhesive Joints
  • Selection of Adhesives
  • Health & Safety Aspects
  • The Surface Pretreatment of Metals
  • The Surface Pretreatment of Plastics
  • Industrial Applications of Anaerobic, Cyanoacrylate and UV Curable
  • Science and Technology of Silane Adhesion Promoters
  • Modelling the Structural Response of Bonded Structures to Service Loading
  • The Bonding Process
  • Quality Assurance in Adhesive Bonding
  • Manufacturing Case Studies I-IV

Course Director

The Course Director is Professor John F Watts.

16-20 April 2018

Nanomaterials

16-20 April 2018

The Course

 
This course will present a review of the state of the art of materials structured at the nanoscale. Nanoscale structure in metals, polymers and ceramics can have a marked influence on structure-property relationships with the possibility of providing behaviour not seen in coarser scale structures. In addition certain new classes of materials may also be produced at this size level, for example, carbon nanotubes, graphene and a variety of colloidal structures. The processing and applications of nanomaterials will also be examined along with the requirements and techniques for characterising a range of nanomaterials in isolation and as part of complex systems.

Provisional Syllabus

Please note that we reserve the right to alter the syllabus. Any major changes will be notified to delegates before the course starts.

Aim

The aim of this course is to introduce the various classes of nanomaterials: ranging from isolated nanostructures, through to nanostructures integrated in bulk materials. The course covers applications ranging from existing commercial nanomaterials found in every day products through to the future generation of nano-enabled products.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of the course and associated assessment package, students will be able to:

  • demonstrate a systematic knowledge of the range and breadth of application of nanomaterials
  • review critically the potential impact, in all classes of materials, of the control of nanostructure
  • describe the methods for the chemical and nanostructural characterisation of such materials and select appropriate techniques for a range of situations
  • outline the nanotechnology production routes currently available
  • identify possible opportunities for nanomaterials in product development and enhancement

Who Should Attend?

The course is directed at engineers and scientists who require a thorough grounding in the benefits of nanomaterials and related technology.  These are applicable to a wide range of industrial scenarios.  The course provides an ideal opportunity to review the scope and applicability of the currently available and emerging nano-structured materials.  While the course is open to all, a scientific or engineering education to degree level, or a higher education qualification in physics or chemistry is desirable.

Lecture Topics

• Nanomaterials: past, present and future
• Materials characterisation at the nanoscale
• Top down and bottom up manufacture of nanomaterials
• Carbon Nanotubes, graphene and other species
• Nanometallics
• Nanoceramics
• Waterborne Polymer Nanoparticles & Composite Particles
• Applications & Properties of Nanocomposite Films & Nanoparticles
• Dispersion of Nanoparticlulates in Polymers
• Mechanical Properties of Nanoreinforced Polymers
• Nanolayers at Polymer/Metal Interfaces
• Self Assembled Monolayers
• Nano-assisted manufacturing
• Nanostructured Coatings for Wear Resistant applications
• Applications of nanomaterials
• Nano-sensors & Biosensors

Recommended background reading

The module is supported by extensive printed notes, including many references.

Text book provided:
Understanding Nanomaterials by Malkiat S.Johal

Further recommended reading includes:
MITURA, S (editor) ‘Nanotechnology in Materials Science.' Elsevier Science BV, Amsterdam, 2000.
YING, J.Y. (editor) 'Nanostructured Materials.' Academic Press, London, 2001.

Course Director

The Course Director is Professor Robert Dorey.

30 April - 4 May 2018

Corrosion Engineering

30 April - 4 May 2018

This is a 5 day postgraduate course on the causes of corrosion and the practice of corrosion control.  The emphasis will be to cover the basic theory of electrochemistry and oxidation as this is essential in the understanding of metallic corrosion.  The thermodynamic and kinetic aspects will be discussed together with metallurgical considerations.  Using this foundation the methods which can be used to reduce, control or even prevent corrosion will be described by internal and external lecturers.

The course is intensive with 20 lectures as well as tutorials and a laboratory visit.  The knowledge gained during the course will be applied to components which have failed due to corrosion, and internationally known consultants will describe, from their own experience, real and important examples.

Hence the course combines academic knowledge with practical field experience.

Provisional Syllabus

Please note that we reserve the right to alter the syllabus. Any major changes will be notified to delegates before the course starts.

Who should attend?

The course is directed at engineers and scientists who are, or expect to be, involved in any form of corrosion and corrosion control in research, design and failure analysis as well as the selection of metals and alloys.  It would also be useful for those in technical management or teaching who wish to update their appreciation of the subject.  

While open to all, the course is designed to be fully appreciated by registrants with a first degree in engineering or science, or who have equivalent experience.  It will be assumed that all delegates are familiar with the basic principles of chemistry.

Provisional Lecture topics

  • Fundamentals of Electrochemistry
  • Uniform and Galvanic Corrosion
  • Pitting and Crevice Corrosion
  • Passivation
  • Fundamentals of high temperature oxidation
  • Cathodic Protection
  • Materials selection in the oil and gas industry
  • Biological corrosion
  • Corrosion in reinforced concrete
  • Scanning probe techniques
  • Environmental cracking and corrosion control in the oil and gas industry
  • Marine corrosion
  • Corrosion of light metals in aircraft
  • Visit to QinetiQ
  • Formulation of paints
  • Corrosion protection of paints
  • Polarisation and electrical impedance spec
  • Test methods in corrosion
  • Surface analysis and microscopy
  • High temperature corrosion
  • Coatings for high temperature protection

The Course Director is Dr Mark Baker, who is a Chartered Scientist.

Next course runs in 2019, date TBC

Surface Analysis: XPS, Auger and SIMS

Next course runs in 2019, date TBC

The Course

This is a one week postgraduate level course. The aim is to provide an intensive introduction to the principles of the electron spectroscopic techniques of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS or ESCA) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), together with scanning Auger microscopy (SAM) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). The course will be staffed by lecturers with considerable experience in applied surface analysis, drawn from both the University of Surrey and elsewhere. Each day will comprise lectures, laboratory demonstrations and classes with the course tutors. Attendees with specific problems concerning the applications of electron spectroscopy will have ample opportunity to consult the lecturers. The number of registrants will be limited to ensure maximum benefit from both the practical classes and tutorial sessions.

Provisional Syllabus

Please note that we reserve the right to alter the syllabus. Any major changes will be notified to delegates before the course starts.

Who Should Attend?

The course is for you if you need a thorough grounding in these surface analysis methods, both for "trouble-shooting" investigations and longer term research projects. As the field of surface analysis continues to develop very rapidly, the course provides an ideal opportunity to review the scope and applicability of such methods for specific applications. If the course would be useful for some of your colleagues, please pass the brochure on or contact us for additional copies. While the course is open to all, a scientific or engineering education to degree level, or a higher education qualification in physics or chemistry is desirable.

Aims

This course aims to:

  • provide a comprehensive understanding of X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Scanning Auger Microscopy and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry
  • impart systematic knowledge on the theory underlying these techniques and current practices in the analysis of surfaces
  • familiarise students with the state-of-the-art equipment
  • provide students with sufficient knowledge that they can decide upon which methods are most appropriate for a range of different materials applications

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the course and associated assessment package, students will:

  • understand the theory and practice of the surface analytical techniques of XPS, Auger and SIMS,
  • appreciate the scope and limitations of each technique and be able to decide which techniques
      are applicable in given circumstances
  • be able to critically assess research in which these techniques have been applied
  • understand and interpret spectroscopic results

Module Content

The course comprises lectures, laboratory demonstrations and classes with course tutors.  Practical aspects of surface analysis, such as specimen preparation will also be described.  Participants with specific problems concerning the application of electron spectroscopy are given ample opportunity to consult the lecturers.  Although the main thrust of the course is developing expertise in XPS, AES and SIMS a brief introduction to the less common surface analysis methods is also provided.

Lecture Topics

  • Introduction to Photoelectron and Auger Spectroscopy I: Basic Principles
  • Introduction to Photoelectron and Auger Spectroscopy II: Chemical Information
  • Introduction to Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry
  • Instrumentation for Surface Analysis
  • SIMS Analysis of Inorganic Systems
  • Quantitative analysis of Surfaces by Electron Spectroscopy (QUASES)
  • Auger and X-Ray Mapping
  • Sputter Depth Profiling
  • Non Destructive Depth Profiling
  • XPS at High Spatial Resolution
  • Surface Analysis of Polymers: SIMS
  • Surface Analysis of Polymers: XPS
  • Applications I: Corrosion Phenomena; Spectra and Images
  • Applications II: Analysis of Hard Coatings
  • Applications III: Adhesion
  • Recent Advances in Surface Analysis

Texts/Sources of Information

Required reading:
Along with extensive course notes, the following textbook is supplied:

Watts JF and Wolstenholme J, An Introduction to Surface Ananlysis by XPS and AES, Wiley,2003.  
(ISBN 047084713)

Recommended background reading:

Briggs D and Seah MP, Practical Surface Analysis, Vol 1, Wiley, 1997.  (ISBN 04719 20819)
Briggs D and Seah MP, Practical Surface Analysis’, Vol.2, Wiley, 1992.  (ISBN 04719 20827)
Wild RK and Flewitt PEK, Physical Methods for Material Characterization, Institute of Physics Publishing, 2001.  (ISBN 07503 08087)

Course Director

The Course Director is Professor John F Watts.

Next course runs in 2019, date TBC

Composite Materials Technology: Design, Technology & Performance

Next course runs in 2019, date TBC

Course Objectives

Delegates completing this course will have been presented with an overview of many important manufacturing, design, joining and repair issues of concern in current applications of composite materials technology. They will also develop an awareness (based on a fundamental understanding of the science and technology involved) of the goals and limitations of structural health monitoring of composite structures, together with an understanding of the considerations involved in implementing many optical and non-optical smart composite applications, including process monitoring, structural/damage monitoring and damage limitation and self-healing.

Provisional Syllabus

Please note that we reserve the right to alter the syllabus. Any major changes will be notified to delegates before the course starts.

Who Should Attend?

The programme has been designed for engineers and scientists with some exposure to composite materials, and/or some working experience with composites, who wish to expand their understanding to include composite design issues and the science and technology of many important smart composite materials systems. The course is also appropriate for new graduates in engineering or materials disciplines wishing to expand their knowledge base to include the area of composite technology and smart composite materials. The aim when discussing any area will be to introduce the concepts involved, and hence the mathematical demands of the course are kept to a minimum (an ability to be able to deal with mathematics at A-level/BTEC equivalent is desirable). All practicing engineers and scientists in industry should therefore find the material readily accessible. 

Lecture Topics

Design

  • Review of basic composite mechanics 
  • Mechanical design criteria 
  • Failure criteria for design 
  • Composite design 
  • Principles of joining and repair 
  • Finite-element analysis: basic principles 
  • Finite-element analysis and composite materials 
  • Design tools and product standards 

Manufacture

  • Reinforcements and matrices 
  • Processing of composite materials 
  • Textile composites: manufacture and behaviour 
  • Manufacture of large composite structures 
  • Optical sensors for process monitoring 
  • An introduction to recycling, sustainability and green issues

Performance

  • Fatigue and delamination issues for composite materials 
  • Non-destructive evaluation for composite structures 
  • Bridges, bridge strengthening and repair 
  • Repair case studies: aircraft, pipework, pressure vessels 
  • Optical sensors for strain and damage monitoring 
  • Commercial perspectives on implementing structural health monitoring: the example of optical systems 
  • Composites in the civil infrastructure: the practicalities 
  • Applications of composites in aerospace 
  • Composite usage in wind and tidal turbine blades

Module Aims

This course aims to:

  • Provide an understanding of many important design, manufacture and performance issues of concern in current applications of composite materials;
  • Present material (including case studies) which indicate current developments within the technology.

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of the module and associated assessment package, students will:

  • Be able to suggest solutions for a wide variety of simple composite design/manufacture performance issues
  • Be able to formulate an initial assessment of whether a particular composite solution for an application appears reasonable in the light of design, manufacturing and performance issues.

Module Content

Design lectures:
Review of basic composite mechanics; mechanical design criteria; failure criteria for design; composite design; principles of joining and repair; finite-element analysis: basic principles; finite-element analysis and composite materials; design tools and product standards

Manufacture lectures:
Reinforcements and matrices; processing of composite materials; textile composites: manufacture and behaviour; manufacture of large composite structures; optical sensors for process monitoring; an introduction to recycling, sustainability and green issues

Performance lectures:
Fatigue and delamination issues for composite materials; non-destructive evaluation for composite structures; bridges, bridge strengthening and repair; repair case studies: aircraft, pipework, pressure vessels; optical sensors for strain and damage monitoring; commercial perspectives on implementing structural health monitoring: the example of optical systems; composites in the civil infrastructure: the practicalities; applications of composites in aerospace; composite usage in wind and tidal turbine blades

Course Directors

The Course Directors are Professor Stephen Ogin and Professor Paul Smith.

Register for a course

For online registration via the 'Surrey Online Store' (available from 1st June)

Contact us

For queries about our short courses

Short Course Administrator
advancedmaterialsmsc@surrey.ac.uk
Tel: +44 (0)1483 686122

Address
Advanced Materials
Department of Mechanical Engineering Sciences
Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences
University of Surrey
Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH