Professor Sandra McNally

Professor of Economics

Qualifications: PhD Economics. University College London, 2003.

Email:
Phone: Work: 01483 68 6955
Room no: 30 AD 00

Office hours

By appointment

Further information

Biography

Sandra McNally is a Professor in the School of Economics. She is Director of the Centre for Vocational Education Research at the London School of Economics (http://cver.lse.ac.uk/). She is also Director of the Education and Skills Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics.

Professor Sandra McNally CV (409.03KB - Requires Adobe Reader)

Research Interests

Economics of Education. 

Research Collaborations

Members of CVER and CEP at LSE on a range of issues in the Economics of Education.

Joint project with Jo Blanden (Surrey) and others about the effects of early childcare provision on subsequent educational outcomes. We are collaborating with  with Kirstine Hansen (IOE, UCL), Birgitta Rabe (ISER, University of Essex) and Emilia del Bono (ISER, Essex). This research is funded by the Nuffield Foundation and ESRC

Publications

Journal articles

  • Gibbons S, McNally S, Viarengo M. (2017) 'Does Additional Spending Help Urban Schools? An Evaluation Using Boundary Discontinuities'. Journal of the European Economic Association,

    Abstract

    This study exploits spatial anomalies in school funding policy in England to provide new evidence on the impact of resources on student achievement in urban areas. Anomalies arise because the funding allocated to Local Education Authorities (LEA) depends, through a funding formula, on the ‘additional educational needs’ of its population and prices in the district. However, the money each school receives from its LEA is not necessarily related to the school’s own specific local conditions and constraints. This implies that neighbouring schools with similar intakes, operating in the same labour market, facing similar prices, but in different LEAs, can receive very different incomes. We find that these funding disparities give rise to sizeable differences in pupil attainment in national tests at the end of primary school, showing that school resources have an important role to play in improving educational attainment, especially for lower socio-economic groups. The design is geographical boundary discontinuity design which compares neighbouring schools, matched on a proxy for additional educational needs of its students (free school meal entitlement – FSM), in adjacent districts. The key identification requirement is one of conditional ignorability of the level of LEA grant, where conditioning is on geographical location of schools and their proportion of FSM children.

  • Eyles A, Machin S, McNally S. (2017) 'Unexpected school reform: Academisation of primary schools in England'. Journal of Public Economics, 155, pp. 108-121.

    Abstract

    The UK change of government in 2010 provoked a large structural change in the English education landscape. Unexpectedly, the new government offered primary schools the chance to have ‘the freedom and the power to take control of their own destiny’, with better performing schools given a green light to fast track convert to become an academy school. In England, schools that become academies have more freedom over many ways in which they operate, including curriculum design, budgets, staffing issues and the shape of the academic year. However, the change to allow primary school academisation has been controversial. This paper reports estimates of the causal effect of academy enrolment on primary school pupils. While the international literature provides growing evidence on the effect of school autonomy in a variety of contexts, little is known about the effect of autonomy on primary schools (which are typically much smaller than secondary schools) and in contexts where the converting school is not deemed to be failing or disadvantaged. The key findings are that English primary schools did change their mode of operation after the exogenous policy change, utilising more autonomy and changing spending behaviour, but this did not lead to improved pupil performance.

  • Hupkau C, McNally S, Ruiz-Valenzuela J, Ventura G. (2017) 'Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications'. National Institute Economic Review, 240 (1), pp. R42-R57.

    Abstract

    Most students do not follow the ‘academic track’ (i.e. A-levels) after leaving school and only about a third of students go to university before the age of 20. Yet progression routes for the majority that do not take this path but opt for vocational post-compulsory education are not as well-known, which partly has to do with the complexity of the vocational education system and the difficulty of deciphering available data. If we are to tackle long-standing problems of low social mobility and a long tail of underachievers, it is essential that post-16 vocational options come under proper scrutiny. This paper is a step in that direction. We use linked administrative data to track decisions made by all students in England who left compulsory education after having undertaken the national examination -the General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE)- at age 16 in the year 2009/10. We track them up to the age of 21, as they progress through the education system and (for some) into the labour market. We categorise the many different types of post-16 qualifications into several broad categories and we look at the probability of achieving various educational and early labour market outcomes, conditional on the path chosen at age 17. We also take into account the influence of demographics, prior attainment and the secondary school attended. Our findings illustrate the strong inequality apparently generated by routes chosen at age 17, even whilst controlling for prior attainment and schooling up to that point.

  • McGuigan M, McNally S, Wyness G. (2016) 'Student Awareness of Costs and Benefits of Educational Decisions: Effects of an Information Campaign'. Journal of Human Capital, 10 (4), pp. 482-519.

    Abstract

    Many students appear to leave full-time education too soon, despite the possibility of high returns from further investment in their education. One contributory factor may be insufficient information about the potential consequences of their choices. We investigate students’ receptiveness to an information campaign about the costs and benefits of pursuing postcompulsory education. Our results show that students with higher expected net benefits from accessing information are more likely to avail themselves of the opportunity presented by our experiment. Their intention to stay on in post-16 education is strongly affected by the experiment, though not their intention to apply to university. Effects are heterogeneous by family background and gender.

  • Blanden J, Del Bono E, McNally S, Rabe B. (2016) 'UNIVERSAL PRE-SCHOOL EDUCATION: THE CASE OF PUBLIC FUNDING WITH PRIVATE PROVISION'. ECONOMIC JOURNAL, 126 (592), pp. 682-723.
  • McNally S, Geay C, Telhaj S. (2013) '‘Non-native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What are the effects on pupil performance?’'. The Economic Journal, 123 (570), pp. F281-F307.
  • Geay C, McNally S, Telhaj S. (2013) 'Non-native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What are the Effects on Pupil Performance?'. Economic Journal,
  • Keslair F, Maurin E, McNally S. (2012) 'Every child matters? An evaluation of "Special Educational Needs" programmes in England'. Economics of Education Review, 31 (6), pp. 932-948.

    Abstract

    The need for education to help every child has become more important for policy in the US and the UK. Remedial programmes are often difficult to evaluate because participation is usually based on pupil characteristics that are largely unobservable to the analyst. We evaluate programmes for children with 'Special Educational Needs' in England. We show that the decentralized design of the policy generates much stronger differences across schools in access to remediation resources for children with moderate learning difficulties than for children with either no difficulties or severe difficulties. However, these differences are not reflected in subsequent educational attainment - suggesting that the programme is ineffective for children with moderate learning difficulties. Also, we use demographic variation within schools to consider the effect of the programme on whole year groups. Our analysis is consistent with no overall effect on account of the combined direct and indirect (spillover) effects. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  • Machin S, McNally S. (2012) 'The Evaluation of English Education Policies'. National Institute Economic Review, 219 (1), pp. R15-R25.
  • Guyon N, Maurin E, McNally S. (2012) 'The Effect of Tracking Students by Ability into Different Schools: A Natural Experiment'. Journal of Human Resources, 47 (3), pp. 684-672.
  • Machin S, McNally S, Meghir C. (2010) 'Resources and Standards in Urban Schools'. Journal of Human Capital, 4 (4), pp. 365-393.
  • Holmlund H, McNally S, Viarengo M. (2010) 'Does Money Matter for Schools?'. Economics of Education Review, 29 (6), pp. 1154-1164.
  • Machin S, McNally S. (2008) 'The Literacy Hour'. Journal of Public Economics, 92, pp. 1141-1462.
  • Maurin E, McNally S. (2008) 'Vive la Révolution! Long term educational returns from 1968 to the angry students'. Journal of Labor Economics, 26 (1), pp. 1-35.
  • Machin S, McNally S, Silva O. (2007) 'New Technology in Schools: Is There a Payoff?'. Economic Journal, 117 (522), pp. 1145-1167.
  • McNally S. (2005) 'Reforms to Schooling in the UK: A Review of Some Major Reforms and their Evaluation'. German Economic Review, 6 (3), pp. 287-296.
  • Machin S, McNally S. (2005) 'Gender and Educational Attainment in the UK'. Oxford Review of Economic Policy, 21 (3), pp. 357-372.
  • Machin S, McNally S, Meghir C. (2004) 'Improving Pupil Performance in English Secondary Schools: Excellence in Cities'. Journal of the European Economics Association, 2 (2-3), pp. 396-405.

Books

  • McNally S, Wolf A. (2011) Education and Economic Performance. Edward Elgar Publishing

    Abstract

    This collection, with an original introduction by the editors, will be of great interest to academics and students interested in growth, productivity, innovation and economic performance.

  • McNally S, Spash CL. (2001) Managing pollution. Edward Elgar Pub

    Abstract

    McNally is with the Environmental Science and Policy Research Group at the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Huntingdon, UK. c. Book News Inc.

Book chapters

  • Gregg P, McNally S, Wadsworth J. (2011) 'Have Reforms to the School System Improved Educational Outcomes?'. in Gregg P, Wadsworth J (eds.) The Labour Market in Winter:The State of Working Britain Oxford University Press

    Abstract

    This collection of essays, from leading economic experts on the UK labour market, provides an overview of the key issues concerning the performance of the labour market, and the policy issues surrounding it, with a focus on the recent ...

  • McNally S. (2008) 'School Education'. in Elliot J, Vaitilingam R (eds.) Now We Are Fifty: Key Findings from the National Child Development Study Centre for Longitudinal Studies, Institute of Education
  • McNally S. (2006) 'De quelques politiques efficaces en Angleterre'. in Chapelle G, Meuret D (eds.) Améliorer l’école Press Universitaires de France

    Abstract

    Grâce aux contributions des meilleurs spécialistes actuels de la sociologie et des politiques d'éducation, les lecteurs pourront donc découvrir ici les pistes de la recherche pour améliorer l'école, en identifiant les enjeux et défis ...

  • Emmerson C, McNally S, Meghir C. (2005) 'Economic Evaluation of Education Initiatives'. in Machin S, Vignoles A (eds.) What’s the Good of Education? The Economics of Education in the UK Princeton University Press

Reports

  • McNally S, Telhaj S. (2010) The Cost of Social Exclusion. in (ed.) Report to the Prince’s Trust
  • McNally S, Meghir C. (2009) Economic Adviser for the Money Guidance Pathfinder Evaluation. in (ed.) Report to the Financial Services Authority
  • Keslair F, McNally S. (2009) Special Educational Needs in England. in (ed.) Report to the National Equality Panel
  • Holmlund H, McNally S, Viarengo M. (2008) Research on the Impact of School Resources on Attainment at Key Stage 2.
  • McNally S. (2008) Improving Educational Outcome for Poor Children. in (ed.) A Response to Brian Jacob and Jens Ludwig, in Social Mobility and Education Article number conference volume
  • Challen A, King D, Knapp M, McNally S. (2008) Economic Modeling for Foresight Project: Mental Capital and Wellbeing.
  • Machin S, McNally S. (2008) Aims for Primary Education: the changing national context. in (ed.) The Primary Review Interim Report Article number Research Survey 1/3
  • McNally S. (2008) Information, Advice and Guidance. A brief literature review.
  • Hussain I, McNally S, Telhaj S. (2008) University Quality and Graduate Wages in the UK. in (ed.) Teaching and Learning Research Programme (TLRP)
  • Machin S, McNally S. (2007) Tertiary Education Systems and Labour Markets.
  • McNally S, Telhaj S. (2006) Value of Inclusion.
  • Emmerson C, Frayne C, McNally S, Silva O. (2006) Aimhigher: Excellence Challenge: A Policy Evaluation using the Labour Force Survey.
  • Emmerson C, Frayne C, McNally S, Silva O. (2006) An Economic Evaluation of the Early Impact of Aimhigher: Excellence Challenge on Pre-16 Outcomes.
  • Golden S, Kendall L, Machin S, McNally S, Meghir C, Morris M, Noden P, O'Donnell L, Ridley K, Rutt S, Schagen I, Stoney S, West A. (2005) Excellence in Cities. The National Evaluation of a policy to raise standards in urban schools 2000-2003. in (ed.) Research Report Article number RR675B
  • Machin S, McNally S. (2005) Education and Child Poverty. in (ed.) Literature review
  • Machin S, McNally S, Meghir C. (2005) Economic Evaluation of Excellence in Cities.
  • Machin S, McNally S. (2005) Differential gender attainment at the end of compulsory schooling and beyond.
  • Braun A, Hind A, McNally S, Noden P, West A. (2005) Final Report of the Evaluation of the Pupil Learning Credits Pilot Scheme. in (ed.) Research Report Article number RR687
  • McNally S. (2005) Economic Evaluation of the Pupil Learning Credits Pilot Scheme. in (ed.) Research Report Article number RR696
  • Emmerson C, Frayne C, McNally S, Pelkonen P. (2004) Economic Evaluation of Excellence in Primary Schools.
  • Machin S, McNally S, Rajagopalan S. (2004) The Enterprise Works Concept Development.
  • Chevalier A, Conlon G, Galindo-Rueda F, McNally S. (2002) The Returns to Higher Education Teaching.

Other publications

  • McGuigan M, McNally S, Wyness G. (2012) Student Awareness of Costs and Benefits of Educational Decisions: Effects of an Information Campaign. (139)
  • Geay C, McNally S, Telhaj S. (2012) Non-Native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What are the Effects on Pupil Performance?. (137)
  • Cornaglia F, Crivellaro E, McNally S. (2012) Mental Health and Education Decisions. (136)
  • McNally S. (2011) The Effects of Education Policy. ESRC Britain in 2012,
  • McNally S. (2011) England v Wales: Education Performance and Accountability. University of York Better: Evidence-based Education, , pp. 22-23.
  • Gibbons S, McNally S, Viarengo M. (2011) Does Additional Spending Help Urban Schools? An Evaluation Using Boundary Discontinuities. (128)
  • McNally S. (2010) ‘The Race Between Education and Technology’, by Claudia Goldin and Lawrence F. Katz. Teachers College Record,
  • McNally S. (2010) Election Analysis. Evaluating Education Policies: The Evidence from Economic Research. LSE Centre for Economic Performance,
  • Guyon N, Maurin E, McNally S. (2010) The Effect of Tracking Students by Ability into Different Schools: a Natural Experiment. (7977)
  • Holmlund H, McNally S. (2009) Pippi Longstocking’s Promies. The House Magazine,
  • Hussain I, McNally S, Telhaj S. (2009) University Quality and Graduate Wages in the UK. (4043)
  • Hussain I, McNally S, Telhaj S. (2009) University Quality and Graduate Wages in the UK. (99)
  • Holmlund H, McNally S. (2009) A Swedish Model for UK Schools?. CentrePiece, 14 (3)
  • Hussain I, McNally S, Telhaj S. (2008) Are the Top Universities Worth Paying For?. CentrePiece,
  • Holmlund H, McNally S, Viarengo M. (2008) Does Money Matter for Schools?. (3769)
  • Machin S, McNally S, Meghir C. (2007) Resources and Standards in Urban Schools. (76)
  • McNally S. (2007) Higher Education and the Labour Market.
  • Maurin E, McNally S. (2007) Widening Access to Grammar Schools: The Educational Impact in Northern Ireland. CentrePiece,
  • Machin S, McNally S, Meghir C. (2007) Resources and Standards in Urban Schools. (2653)
  • Machin S, McNally S, Silva O. (2006) New Technology in Schools: Is there a Payoff?. (2234)
  • McNally S. (2006) ‘The Economics of Education: Human Capital, Family Background and Inequality,’ by Daniele Checchi. Economica, 75 (298), pp. 398-399.
  • Machin S, McNally S, Silva O. (2006) New Technology in Schools: Is there a Payoff?. (55)
  • McNally S. (2005) ‘The Education Gap: Vouchers and Urban Schools’, by William G. Howell and Peter E. Peterson, with Patrick J. Wolf and David E. Campbell. Education Economics, 13 (1), pp. 129-131.
  • Machin S, McNally S, Meghir C. (2005) Evaluating Excellence in Cities. CentrePiece,
  • Maurin E, McNally S. (2005) Children of the Revolution: the economic impact of '1968' in France. CentrePiece,
  • Maurin E, McNally S. (2005) Vive la Révolution! Long term returns of 1968 to the angry students. (1504)
  • Maurin E, McNally S. (2005) Vive la Révolution! Long term returns of 1968 to the angry students. (49)
  • Maurin E, McNally S. (2005) Vive la Révolution! Long term returns of 1968 to the angry students. (4940)
  • Machin S, McNally S. (2004) The Literacy Hour. (43)
  • Machin S, McNally S. (2004) Large Benefits, Low Cost. CentrePiece,
  • Machin S, McNally S. (2004) The Impact of the Literacy Hour. Literacy Today, 40
  • Machin S, McNally S. (2004) The Literacy Hour. (1005)

Some discussion papers 
Student Awareness of Costs and Benefits of Educational Decisions: Effects of an Information Campaign and Media Exposure (with Martin McGuigan and Gill Wyness). IZA Discussion Paper No. 8596. October 2014.
 

The Effects of Resources across School Phases: A Summary of Recent Evidence. (with Steve Gibbons). CEP Discussion Papers, CEPDP1226. Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK. 2013.
 

Does Additional Spending Help Urban Schools? An Evaluation Using Boundary Discontinuities (with Steve Gibbons and Martina Viarengo).
SERC Discussion Paper No. 90; CEE Discussion Paper No. 128.
 

University Quality and Graduate Wages in the UK (with Iftikha Hussain and Shqiponja Telhaj). IZA Discussion Paper. No. 4043. CEE Discussion Paper. No. 99
 

Reports


Report to the LSE Growth Commission: Education and Skills. 2012
http://www2.lse.ac.uk/researchAndExpertise/units/growthCommission/documents/pdf/contributions/lseGC_mcnally_edSkills.pdf


The Cost of Social Exclusion (with Shqiponja Telhaj). Report to the Prince’s Trust. November 2010.


Special Educational Needs in England (with Francois Keslair). Report to the National Equality Panel. July 2009.


Economic Adviser for the Money Guidance Pathfinder Evaluation (with Costas Meghir), Report to the Financial Services Authority. July 2009.


Improving Educational Outcome for Poor Children. A Response to Brian Jacob and Jens Ludwig, in Social Mobility and Education, conference volume, Sutton Trust and Carnegie Foundation. June 2008.


Information, Advice and Guidance. A brief literature review, report for the Sutton Trust. January 2008.


University Quality and Graduate Wages in the UK (with Iftikhar Hussain and Shqiponja Telhaj). Report for the Teaching and Learning Research Programme (TLRP), ESRC. 2008.


Economic Modeling for Foresight Project: Mental Capital and Wellbeing. (with Amy Challen, Derek King and Martin Knapp). Report prepared for DIUS. May 2008.


Research on the Impact of School Resources on Attainment at Key Stage 2. (with Helena Holmlund and Martina Viarengo). Report prepared for DCSF. July 2008. http://www.education.gov.uk/publications/RSG/publicationDetail/Page1/DCSF-RR043
 

Aims for Primary Education: the changing national context, (with Stephen Machin). Research Survey 1/3. The Primary Review Interim Report. University of Cambridge. 2008
 

Tertiary Education Systems and Labour Markets (with Stephen Machin). A report prepared for the OECD, 2007.
http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/55/31/38006954.pdf
 

Value of Inclusion (with Shqiponja Telhaj). Report to the Prince’s Trust, July 2006
 

Aimhigher: Excellence Challenge: A Policy Evaluation using the Labour Force Survey, Report to the Department for Education and Skills, April 2006 (with Carl Emmerson, Christine Frayne, and Olmo Silva)
 

An Economic Evaluation of the Early Impact of Aimhigher: Excellence Challenge on Pre-16 Outcomes (with Carl Emmerson, Christine Frayne and Olmo Silva), Report to the Department for Education and Skills. January 2006.
 

Education and Child Poverty (with Stephen Machin). Literature review for the Joseph Rowntree Foundation. October 2005
 

Economic Evaluation of Excellence in Cities (with Stephen Machin and Costas Meghir). Report to the Department for Education and Skills. June 2005
Excellence in Cities. The National Evaluation of a policy to raise standards in urban schools 2000-2003, Report to DfES. November 2005. Research Report, RR675B (with Lesley Kendall, Lisa O’Donnell, Sarah Golden, Kate Ridley, Stephen Machin, Simon Rutt, Ian Schagen Costas Meghir, Sheila Stoney, Marian Morris, Anne West and Philip Noden)
 

Differential gender attainment at the end of compulsory schooling and beyond (with Stephen Machin), Report to the British Academy, April 2005
Economic Evaluation of the Pupil Learning Credits Pilot Scheme, Report to the Department for Education and Skills, 2005.  Research Report RR696.
Final Report of the Evaluation of the Pupil Learning Credits Pilot Scheme, Report to the Department for Education and Skills, 2005. Research Report RR687. (with Annette Braun, Audrey Hind, Philip Noden and Anne West)
 

Economic Evaluation of Excellence in Primary Schools. (with Carl Emmerson, Christine Frayne and Panu Pelkonen). Report to the Department for Education and Skills, October 2004
 

The Enterprise Works Concept Development (with Stephen Machin and Shankar Rajagopalan). Report to the Prince’s Trust, September 2004.
The Returns to Higher Education Teaching, (with Arnaud Chevalier, Gavan Conlon, and Fernando Galindo-Rueda), Report to the Department for Education and Skills,  March 2002.

Other
The Effects of Education Policy. Britain in 2012. ESRC magazine. December 2011.
England v Wales: Education Performance and Accountability. Better: Evidence-based Education. (Magazine of the Institute of Effective Education, University of York) p. 22-23. Spring 2011.
‘Election Analysis. Evaluating Education Policies: The Evidence from Economic Research’. Centre for Economic Performance, LSE. April 2010.
http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea008.pdf
‘A Swedish Model for UK Schools?’ (with Helena Holmlund). CentrePiece (CEP magazine). Volume 14. Issue 3. Winter 2009/10.
‘Pippi Longstocking’s Promies’ (about Academies and the Swedish Model) (with Helena Holmlund). The House Magazine. (Weekly publication for the Houses of Parliament).October 5 2009.
‘Are the Top Universities Worth Paying For?’ (with Iftikhar Hussain and Shqiponja Telhaj). CentrePiece. Autumn 2008.
‘School Education’ in Jane Elliot and Romesh Vaitilingam (ed). ‘Now We Are Fifty: Key Findings from the National Child Development Study’. Centre for Longitudinal Studies, Institute of Education. 2008
‘Evaluating Excellence in Cities’ (with Stephen Machin and Costas Meghir). CentrePiece, Winter 2005/06
‘Children of the Revolution: the economic impact of '1968' in France’ (with Eric Maurin. CentrePiece, Summer 2005
‘Large Benefits, Low Cost’ (with Stephen Machin), CentrePiece (article about the literacy hour), Spring 2004. Reproduced in Boys in Schools Bulletin, a professional development journal for Australian teachers produced by the University of Newcastle.
‘The Impact of the Literacy Hour’ (with Stephen Machin), Literacy Today, No. 40, September 2004. Summary published as ‘The English Experiment’, Education Next, Summer 2005
‘Widening Access to Grammar Schools: The Educational Impact in Northern Ireland,’ (with Eric Maurin). CentrePiece. Summer 2007
‘Higher Education and the Labour Market.’ (with Stephen Machin). Autumn 2007.

Book Reviews:
‘The Race Between Education and Technology’, by Claudia Goldin and Lawrence F. Katz. Teachers College Record. June 2010.
‘The Economics of Education: Human Capital, Family Background and Inequality,’ by
Daniele Checchi, Cambridge University Press, 2006. Economica 75 (298): 398-399
‘The Education Gap: Vouchers and Urban Schools’, by William G. Howell and Peter E. Peterson, with Patrick J. Wolf and David E. Campbell. Washington, DC: The Brookings Institution, 2002
Education Economics, March 2005, Vol. 13, No. 1, p. 129-131.

Environmental Economics
‘Are ‘Other Gainful Activities’ on farms good for the environment?’ Journal of Environmental Management, 2002, Vol. 66, pp. 57-65.
‘Farm diversification in England and Wales – what can we learn from the Farm Business Survey?’ Journal of Rural Studies, 2001, Vol. 17, No. 2, pp. 247-257.
‘Wetland restoration, collective action and the role of water management institutions’, Ecological Economics, The Journal of the International Society for Economical Economics, 2000, Vol. 35, No. 1, 107-118  (with Ian Hodge)
‘Evaluating the Environmentally Sensitive Areas: the value of rural environments and policy relevance’, Journal of Rural Studies, 1998, Vol. 14, No. 3, 357-367 (with Ian Hodge)

Managing Pollution, edited volume of case studies on approaches by Environmental Economists to evaluate the impacts of pollution. Edward Elgar, 2001 (with Clive Spash).

Teaching

Human Resource Economics (EC0M028)

Statistics for Economics (EC01020)

Departmental Duties

Library liaison person, School of Economics

Affiliations

- IZA Research Fellow, Institute for the Study of Labor, Bonn (since November 2003)

- CESifo, Research Network Fellow. Munich (since November 2009).

- Member of Coalition for Evidence-Based Education (CEBE). (since 2009)

- Member of ESRC Peer Review College. From March 2010.

- Member of Network of Experts on Social Aspects of Education and Training (European Commission network). From January 2011.

- Board of Directors. Association for Education Finance and Policy. March 2012-2015

- Associate Editor of the Economics of Education Review. From January 2013.

- Executive Committee Member for the European Association of Labour Economists. From 2015.
 

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