Dr Marina Chumakina

Research Fellow (SMG)

Qualifications: 2001 PhD 'The cognitive and formal structure of conditional constructions' (Moscow State University). 1998 MA Theoretical and Applied Linguistics (Moscow State University)

Email:
Phone: Work: 01483 68 2843
Room no: 42 AC 05

Further information

Biography

Research fellow in Surrey Morphology Group

Publications

Journal articles

  • Bond O, Chumakina M. (2014) 'Attributives in Archi: A mixed category with multiple bases'. Manuscript under review,
    [ Status: Submitted ]
  • Brown DP, Chumakina, M, Corbett G, Popova, G., Spencer, A. . (2012) 'Defining ‘periphrasis’: key notions'. Morphology, 22 (2), pp. 233-275.

    Abstract

    We examine the notion of ‘(inflectional) periphrasis’ within the framework of Canonical Typology, and argue that the canonical approach allows us to define a logically coherent notion of periphrasis. We propose a set of canonical criteria for inflectional morphology and a set of canonical criteria for functional syntax, that is, syntactic constructions which include functional elements and which express grammatical features. We argue that canonical periphrasis is exemplified in our theoretical space of possibilities whenever a cell in a (canonically morphological) inflectional paradigm (‘feature intersection’) is expressed by a multiword construction which respects the canonical properties of functional syntax. We compare our canonically-based approach with the approach of other authors, notably, Ackerman & Stump (2004), who argue for three sufficient conditions for a construction to be regarded as periphrastic: feature intersection, non-compositionality and distributed exponence. We argue that non-compositionality and distributed exponence, while sometimes diagnostic of periphrasis on a language-particular basis, do not constitute canonical properties of periphrasis. We also examine crucial but neglected syntactic aspects of periphrastic constructions: recursion of periphrases and headedness of periphrastic constructions. The approach we propose allows us to distinguish between constructions in actual languages which approximate the ideal of canonical periphrasis to various degrees without committing us to a categorical distinction between periphrastic and non-periphrastic constructions. At the same time we can capture the intuition that there is in some languages a distinct identifiable set of multiword constructions whose principal role is to realize grammatical features.

  • Chumakina M. (2011) 'Nominal periphrasis: A canonical approach'. Studies in Language, 35 (2), pp. 247-274.
  • Chumakina M, Kibort A, Corbett GG. (2007) 'Determining a language’s feature inventory: person in Archi'. Endangered Languages (special issue of Linguistische Berichte), 14, pp. 143-172.

    Abstract

    In descriptions of languages, we make use of morphosyntactic features such as gender, number or person. This paper shows that sometimes choosing the features and values to describe a language is not straightforward, and the decision of whether or not to use a particular feature requires careful consideration. Thus, when determining a language’s feature inventory, we should consider both why we posit a given feature, and how many values to posit for the feature. In our case study we look closely at the Daghestanian language Archi. It is usually assumed that languages have a person feature, but with Archi this is not self-evident. Archi (like some related languages) has no unique forms for agreement in person, and the standard descriptions of this language do not involve the feature person. However, the agreement patterns in Archi may be interpreted in favour of the presence of this feature, despite the absence of any phonologically distinct forms realising it. Thus, we claim that Archi does have the feature of person that had not been recognised for this language before. We also give a brief overview of the category of person in the languages of Daghestan.

  • Hippisley A, Chumakina M, Corbett GG, Brown D. (2004) 'Suppletion: Frequency, categories and distribution of stems'. Studies in Language, 28 (2), pp. 387-418.
  • Chumakina M, Hippisley A, Corbett GG. (2004) 'Istoriceskie izmenenija v russkoj leksike: slucaj cereduju?cegosja suppletivizma [Historical changes in the Russian lexicon: a case of alternating suppletion]'. Russian Linguistics, 28, pp. 281-315.

Conference papers

  • Corbett GG, Brown DP, Chumakina M. (2008) 'Prolegomena to a typology of periphrasis'. Vienna: 13th International Morphology Meeting

    Abstract

    Periphrasis straddles the boundary between syntax and morphology, and so creates analytical and theoretical problems. These concern the nature of the word, the interaction between syntax and morphology, and the possible sizes and shapes of inflectional paradigms. Progress has been hampered because the theoretical devices available have been inadequate and because the range of data considered has been narrow. We are therefore undertaking a typological survey, adopting a ‘canonical’ approach in which we specify the different dimensions along which concrete instances of periphrasis can be classified as more or less canonical. Periphrastic constructions are common, yet relatively little is known about their typological range. Following Haspelmath (2000), our canonical approach encompasses not just verbs but also comparable phenomena involving other parts of speech (‘analytic’ forms in some traditions). Thus we include less familiar examples, such as this one, showing periphrastic expression of number on nouns. We give just two of seven cases: Nenets ti ‘reindeer’ (Ackerman 2000:3) SINGULAR DUAL PLURAL NOMINATIVE ti tex°h tiq DATIVE ten°h tex°h nyah tex°q Number and case are expressed synthetically for most cells of the paradigm, except for certain cells in the dual (represented here by the dative). We plan a careful examination of four key languages, Archi, Bininj Gun-Wok, Nenets and Sanskrit, each of which has significant and different instances of periphrasis. Based on this survey, we will establish: • the set of criteria for periphrasis; this is to define the space across which to calibrate any attested periphrastic construction. We shall start from the definitions in Ackerman & Stump (2004: 125-147). • the typological range of periphrasis, taking into account both the constructions and how they interact with language-specific morphological and syntactic rules • the diachronic stages that the syntactic phrase goes through on its way to becoming part of the morphological paradigm, and the conditions that permit this. Periphrasis can be understood in terms of a configuration of properties of canonical inflectional morphology (e.g. obligatoriness) and canonical syntax (e.g. independence of expression), as in our Nenets example. The canonical approach with its inclusive orientation allows us to calibrate and clarify the differing intuitions of typologists, and place periphrasis within the larger space of morphology-syntax interaction. Acker

  • Hippisley A, Chumakina M, Corbett GG, Brown D. (2004) 'Suppletion - Frequency, categories and distribution of stems'. JOHN BENJAMINS B V PUBL STUDIES IN LANGUAGE, Univ Manchester, Manchester, ENGLAND: Meeting of the Linguistics-Association-of-Great-Britain 28 (2), pp. 387-418.

Books

  • Bond O, Corbett GG, Chumakina M, Brown D. (2016) Archi: Complexities of agreement in cross-theoretical perspective. Oxford : Oxford University Press

    Abstract

    This book presents a controlled evaluation of three widely practised syntactic theories on the basis of the extremely complex agreement system of Archi, an endangered Nakh-Daghestanian language. Even straightforward agreement examples are puzzling for syntacticians because agreement involves both redundancy and arbitrariness. Agreement is a significant source of syntactic complexity, exacerbated by the great diversity of its morphological expression. Imagine how the discipline of linguistics would be if expert practitioners of different theories met in a collaborative setting to tackle such challenging agreement data - to test the limits of their models and examine how the predictions of their theories differ given the same linguistic facts. Following an overview of the essentials of Archi grammar and an introduction to the remarkable agreement phenomena found in this language, three distinct accounts of the Archi data examine the tractability and predictive power of major syntactic theories: Head-driven Phrase Structure Grammar, Lexical Functional Grammar, and Minimalism. The final chapter compares the problems encountered and the solutions proposed in the different syntactic analyses and outlines the implications of the challenges that the Archi agreement system poses for linguistic theory.

  • Chumakina M, Corbett GG. (2012) Periphrasis. The Role of Syntax and Morphology in Paradigms. Oxford University Press/British Academy

    Abstract

    Periphrasis straddles the border between two major linguistic components, morphology and syntax. It describes a situation where a grammatical meaning, such as a tense, which could be expected to be expressed morphologically within a word, is instead expressed by a syntactic phrase. Inclusion of syntactic phrases in morphological paradigms creates analytical and theoretical problems that have yet to be resolved by linguists, who have been hampered by the rather narrow range of data available for consideration and by a lack of adequate theoretical devices. This book addresses the challenge by broadening the range of phenomena under discussion and presenting new theoretical approaches to the problem of periphrasis. Part I takes four key languages from diverse families - Nakh-Daghestanian, Gunwinyguan (Australian), Uralic and Indo-European - as examples of languages in which periphrasis poses particular problems for current linguistic theories. Part II views periphrasis in different contexts, determining its place within the morphological and syntactic systems of the languages it is found in, its relations to other linguistic phenomena, and the typological variation represented by periphrastic constructions. Treating periphrasis as a morphological and syntactic phenomenon at the same time and applying the criteria worked out within the Canonical Typology approach allows linguists to view periphrasis as a family of phenomena within a typological space of syntactic constructions used to fulfil grammatical functions.

  • Brown DP, Chumakina M, Corbett GG. (2012) Canonical Morphology and Syntax. Oxford University Press

    Abstract

    This is the first book to present Canonical Typology, a framework for comparing constructions and categories across languages. The canonical method takes the criteria used to define particular categories or phenomena (eg negation, finiteness, possession) to create a multidimensional space in which language-specific instances can be placed. In this way, the issue of fit becomes a matter of greater or lesser proximity to a canonical ideal. Drawing on the expertise of world class scholars in the field, the book addresses the issue of cross-linguistic comparability, illustrates the range of areas - from morphosyntactic features to reported speech - to which linguists are currently applying this methodology, and explores to what degree the approach succeeds in discovering the elusive canon of linguistic phenomena.

  • Chumakina M, Brown DP, Quilliam H, Corbett GG. (2007) Slovar´ arčinskogo jazyka (arčinsko-russko-anglijskij) [A dictionary of Archi: Archi-Russian-English]. Makhachkala : Delovoj Mir, xxiv + 410 pp.

    Abstract

    A Dictionary of the Archi (Daghestanian) Language including word sounds and illustrations.

    Archi is spoken by about 1200 people in a remote mountain region in Daghestan. The language is characterised by remarkable phonetics, a very high degree of irregularity in all its inflecting word classes and by its morphological system, with extremely large paradigms. Archi culture is one of the most distinctive and best-preserved cultures of Daghestan

Book chapters

  • Chumakina M, Bond O, Corbett GG. (2016) 'Essentials of Archi grammar. (Chapter 2)'. in Bond O, Corbett GG, Chumakina M, Brown D (eds.) Archi: Complexities of agreement in cross-theoretical perspective Oxford : Oxford University Press , pp. 17-42.
  • Chumakina M, Bond O. (2016) 'Competing controllers and agreement potential. (Chapter 4)'. in Bond O, Corbett GG, Chumakina M, Brown D (eds.) Archi: Complexities of agreement in cross-theoretical perspective Oxford : Oxford University Press , pp. 77-117.
  • Bond O, Chumakina M. (2016) 'Agreement domains and targets. (Chapter 3)'. in Bond O, Corbett GG, Chumakina M, Brown D (eds.) Archi: Complexities of agreement in cross-theoretical perspective Oxford : Oxford University Press , pp. 43-76.
  • Bond O, Corbett GG, Chumakina M . (2016) 'Introduction'. in Bond O, Corbett G, Chumakina M, Brown D (eds.) Archi: Complexities of agreement in cross-theoretical perspective Oxford : Oxford University Press (1), pp. 1-16.
  • Bond O, Chumakina M. (2016) 'Agreement domains and targets. (Chapter 3)'. in Bond O, Corbett GG, Chumakina M, Brown D (eds.) Archi: Complexities of agreement in cross-theoretical perspective Oxford : Oxford University Press , pp. 43-76.
  • Chumakina M, Bond O. (2016) 'Competing controllers and agreement potential. (Chapter 4)'. in Bond O, Corbett GG, Chumakina M, Brown D (eds.) Archi: Complexities of agreement in cross-theoretical perspective Oxford : Oxford University Press , pp. 77-117.
  • Chumakina M, Corbett GG. (2015) 'Gender-number marking in Archi: Small is complex'. in (ed.) Understanding and Measuring Morphological Complexity
  • Chumakina M. (2014) 'Periphrasis in Archi1'. in (ed.) Periphrasis: The Role of Syntax and Morphology in Paradigms

    Abstract

    © Oxford University Press, 2014.The Nakh-Daghestanian language Archi has several types of verbal constructions: periphrases, complex predicates, and phenomena very similar to serial verb constructions. This chapter investigates these constructions, using the approach of canonical typology; this allows different constructions to be ranked in terms of their proximity to the canonical centre. The analysis suggested is relevant for the general typology of multiword constructions, since it identifies tests for distinguishing them: for complex predicates the test will be their syntactic behaviour, for constructions close to serialization it is the fact that they are only available for a subset of verbs, while periphrasis is exhaustive. The chapter also has a descriptive purpose: published research on Archi does not describe all the available meanings for the periphrastic constructions nor their syntactic behaviour, and so an attempt is made to fill these gaps.

  • Chumakina M. (2012) 'What there might be and what there is: an introduction to Canonical Typology'. in Brown D, Chumakina M, Corbett GG (eds.) Canonical Morphology and Syntax Oxford University Press Article number 1 , pp. 1-19.
  • Chumakina M. (2009) 'Loanwords in Archi, a Nakh-Daghestanian language of Central Daghestan.'. in Haspelmath M, Tadmor U (eds.) Loanwords in the World's languages: A Comparative handbook Berlin : Mouton de Gruyter Article number 16
  • Chumakina M, Corbett GG. (2008) 'Archi: the challenge of an extreme agreement system.'. in A. V. Arxipov, L. M. Zaxarov, A. A. Kibrik, A. E.Kibrik, I. M. Kobozeva, O. F. Krivnova, Ljutikova EA, Fëdorova OV (eds.) Fonetika i nefonetika: K 70-letiju Sandro V. Kodzasova Moscow : Jazyki slavjanskix kul´tur , pp. 184-194.

Internet publications

  • Chumakina M, Brown D, Corbett G, Quilliam H. (2011) Surrey Periphrasis Database [Available at: http://www.smg.surrey.ac.uk/Peri/].
  • Chumakina M, Corbett GG, Brown D, Quilliam H. (2007) A Dictionary of the Languages of the Archi villages, south Daghestan [Available at: http://www.smg.surrey.ac.uk/archi/linguists/index.aspx ].
  • Chumakina M, Brown D, Corbett G, Hippisley A. (2004) Suppletion Database. [Available at: http://www.smg.surrey.ac.uk/Suppletion/index.aspx ].

Other publications

  • Chumakina M, Brown D, Corbett G, Quilliam H. (2008) Archi: A dictionary of the language of the Archi People, Daghestan, Caucasus, with sounds and pictures (reference edition, DVD for Windows).

    Abstract

    Archi is spoken by about 1200 people in a remote mountain region in Daghestan. The language is characterised by remarkable phonetics, a very high degree of irregularity in all its inflecting word classes and by its morphological system, with extremely large paradigms. Archi culture is one of the most distinctive and best-preserved cultures of Daghestan.

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