PhD projects

A list of PhD Projects currently available is shown below.  If you have an idea for a project not currently shown please feel free to contact us to discuss your ideas.  For further details on applying for a PhD please see the ATI Postgraduate Research Page.

Supervisor - Ravi Silva

Co-supervisor - David Carey

Research Group - Nano-Electronics Centre

Type - Experimental

Techniques used - Deposition, optical and electrical charcterisation of different types of carbon and diamond-like carbon materials

Objectives

Three PhD projects:

  1. Carbon Superlattice Devices: The LAE&N group are part of a UK wide consortium of leading research groups in the UK examining the use of carbon based materials for electronics. One project involves the growth and characterisation of novel superlattice structures based on different type of amorphous carbon from diamond-like carbon to polymer like carbon. Our deposition systems are capable are producing a wide variety of material and this project will look at the optical as well as the electrical properties.
  2. Laser ablation and pulsed laser deposition of carbon nanostructure: Using our excimer laser and associated deposition system we aim to grow and characterise nanotubes, nanoparticles, diamond based materials etc with a view to incorporating them in devices such as field emission displays and smart dust applications.
  3. Large Area devices based on amorphous carbon alloys: It is possible by clever changes in deposition conditions to be able to produce a wide range of amorphous carbon related alloys including a-SiC, and a-CN. The aims of this project are to grow and characterise the electrical and optical properties of the materials for both passive and active electronics

Supervisor - David Carey

Co-supervisor - Ravi Silva

Research Group - Nano-Electronics Centre

Type - Theoretical

Techniques used - Ab initio density functional theory methods using existing software (DMol and CASTEP) on a dedicated server.

Student will require

First class UG degree or good MSc in electronic engineering, physics or material science.

This project is ideal for any graduate with an interest in the electronic and structural properties of materials, in particular graphene based materials.  It would suit a student who is interested in quantum engineering, solid state and condensed matter physics.

Objectives

  1. This project will use ab initio density functional theory to examine the electronic properties of 2D layered materials
  2. How the electronic properties such band structure and density of states is related to the structure of the materials and how this might change with adsorption
  3. The project will also examine the interaction between electrons and phonons in these materials

Project description

Graphene is the most famous of two dimensional materials but 2D layered materials also include materials made from Si and Ge - these are called silicene and germanene. Other layered materials include the transition metal dichalcogenides (e.g. MoS2). These materials are some of the most topical materials under scientific investigation.

This project is concerned with understanding the stability of these materials and will examine the band gap, the band structure, density of states and electron-phonon coupling. In particular understanding how the band gap might be changed. The proposed PhD follows from our recent study (2013) published in ACS Nano. on bilyaer graphene [1] Check out http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/nn400340q for more information.

This project is ideal for any graduate with an interest in the electronic and structural properties of materials, in particular graphene based materials. It would suit a student who is interested in graphene electronics, quantum engineering, solid state and condensed matter physics.

[1] Molecular Doping and Band Gap Opening of Bilayer Graphene, Alexander J. Samuels and J. David Carey, ACS Nano 7, 2790 (2013).

Supervisor David Carey

Research Group - Nano-Electronics Centre

Type - Theoretical

Techniques used

  • Ab initio density functional theory methods using existing software (DMol and CASTEP) on a dedicated server
  • Both LDA, GGA functionals and hybrid functionals will be employed to calculate the density of states, band structure and how these change with adsorption

Student will require

First class UG degree or good MSc in electronic engineering, physics or material science.

This project is ideal for any graduate with an interest in the electronic and structural properties of materials, in particular graphene based materials.  It would suit a student who is interested in graphene electronics, quantum engineering, solid state and condensed matter physics.

Objectives

  1. This project will use ab initio density functional theory to examine the electronic properties of graphene and related materials such as bilayer graphene in the presence of atoms and molecules 
  2. The project will examine how adsorption induces changes the carrier concentration (doping) of graphene and identify donor or acceptor behaviour.
  3. How the electronic and optical band gap depends on the type of species adsorbed and their concentration
  4. How the electronic properties such band structure and density of states changes with adsorption
  5. The effect that adsorption may have on the transport properties (e.g. mobility and scattering) of carriers

Project description

Graphene has emerged as a promising candidate for technological advances in a number of areas of electronics, photonics and material science due to an impressive list of electronic, transport  and optical  properties. The discovery of single layer graphene (SLG) has revealed a description of the carriers in terms of massless Dirac Fermions,  a new quantum Hall behaviour  and high carrier mobility. Key to the successful application of a functional material in an electronic or photonic device is an ability to control the carrier concentration and for a number of electronic applications, especially digital switching applications, the zero band gap nature of SLG remains problematic as it limits the on/off current ratio of graphene transistors.

This project is concerned with understanding how the adsorption of atoms or molecules on the surface of single layer and bilayer graphene can change the carrier concentration and open up an electronic and optical band gap. The project may also have significant implications for graphene based sensor technology. The proposed PhD follows from our recent study (2013) published in ACS Nano.[1] Check out http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/nn400340q  for more information. 

[1] Molecular Doping and Band Gap Opening of Bilayer Graphene, Alexander J. Samuels and J. David Carey, ACS Nano 7, 2790 (2013).

Left: Change in electron density surrounding bilayer graphene with an absorbed F2-HCNQ molecule. The red and blue regions show areas of increasing and decreasing electron density, respectively.  Right: Calculated electronic band gap as a function of carrier concentration induced by a number of different molecules as indicated.

Supervisor - Ravi Silva

Co-supervisor David Carey

Research Group - Nano-Electronics Centre

Type - Experimental

Techniques used - Electrical charcterisation of devices

Objectives

  1. Transparent electronics: Using plastic or glass or paper for electronics!!! It sounds weird but it is possible to use transparent materials for advanced electronics applications (not that paper is transparent!). In this project we will examine the electronic properties of a host of materials with a view to optimise their properties for practical large area electronic applications. Parts of this project involve Philips' Research Laboratories, Redhill.
  2. Solar cells and photovoltaics: Using a range of polymer and other materials we aim to improve on the photo-efficiency of large area solar cell materials. Amorphous carbon, polymer/nanotube composites and amorphous silicon/crystallised will be employed.

Supervisor Maxim Shkunov

Co-supervisor - Peter Aaen

Research Group - Nano-Electronics Centre

Type - Experimental

Student will require

The successful candidate will need to meet the EPSRC nationality criteria to be eligible for the funding. Applicants should have a good undergraduate or masters degree in one the disciplines: electronic engineering, physics, materials science with a good knowledge of semiconductors. Demonstrated good hands-on experimental skills would be an advantage.

Funding source

EPSRC CASE award in conjunction with BAE Systems. 

Funding applies only to UK and EU applicants.

Full funding for UK applicants will include tuition fees and living expenses (eligibility criteria apply).

Project description

Printed electronics potentially enables the realisation of low-cost, high-volume, high-throughput, lightweight, and disposable electronic devices on many substrates including conventional printed-circuit boards, glass, and flexible plastic substrates using fast printing techniques.

Recent progress in functional nanomaterials, including conducting, insulating and semiconducting materials opens up possibilities for the development of solution-processed printed device circuits. Combining traditional ink-jet printing with these materials creates new and exciting possibilities for circuit designs that are transparent, flexible, span large areas, are fully integrated, and self-powered.  This technology is particularly well-suited for radio-frequency (RF) and microwave circuit design for next generation wireless devices as they can potentially be used to realise inexpensive reconfigurable antennas, reflectors, integrated switches and logic in low-power consumption and energy-harvesting packaging. All of which will be necessary to support the billions of new sensors and devices forecast to be part of the Internet-of-Things.

In this project we would aim to further develop and demonstrate printing technology at microwave frequencies 1 – 60 GHz for reconfigurable antennas, reflectors and beam manipulations through large area reconfigurable lenses on various substrates including flexible plastic sheets. The project aim is that these reconfigurable antennas will be able to modify their fundamental operating characteristics, for example: radiation pattern, operational frequencies, and polarisation, by using switches that are printed on the reconfigurable devices itself.  These switches are based on printable nanomaterial field-effect transistors and diodes utilising nanowire technologies that are under development in our laboratory.   

How to apply

Candidates are asked to contact Dr Maxim Shkunov  in the first instance. Applications should be submitted online through the link available on Electronic Engineering PhD web page.  During the application process you will asked to submit relevant documents including a CV, covering letter, transcript of your degree.  In the project proposal section of the application please enter the project title given above and identify that you wish to work with Dr Shkunov at Advanced Technology Institute, Electronic and Electrical Engineering.

Application deadline

15 December 2015

Supervisor Maxim Shkunov

Research Group - Nano-Electronics Centre

Type - Experimental

Techniques used

  • Solution based deposition of semiconducting layers
  • Ink-jet printing
  • Characterisation techniques AFM, SEM
  • Self-assembled monolayer deposition; Nano-imprint
  • Field-effect transistor fabrication and characterisation of flexible foils

Student will require

  • To be open towards multidisciplinary research
  • Have good hands-on skills
  • Have good background in either of the disciplines: electronic engineering, physics, materials, physical chemistry

Objectives

To develop high performance printed electronic devices on plastic foils for rollable displays. Explore charge transport and injection at dielectric/semiconductor and metal/semiconductor interfaces.
Exploit ink-jet printing capabilities do deposit functional nanomaterials.

Study evolution of devices properties when semiconducting component size is shrunk from tens of micron to sub-micron range. Investigate environmental stability of the devices and develop understanding of degradation mechanisms.

Project description

Novel printable semiconductors, based on nanomaterials and conjugated molecules, are now demonstrating high charge carrier mobility exceeding that of amorphous silicon. This dramatic progress is opening up possibilities for flexible displays such as pocket-size maps and even rollable TVs. The challenge remains to develop high performing field-effect transistors on plastic substrates to switch pixels in these displays.

Current aim is to use “wet” assembly of the semiconducting component and also device electrodes using solvent-based deposition processes including dip-coating, spin-coating, screen-printing or ink-jet printing.

In this project we will be using a range of semiconductor materials such as organic molecules, inorganic nanowires and carbon nanotubes, all suitable for deposition of plastic substrates. Both charge transport and injection from a range of electrodes will be optimised to achieve high switching speeds. Minimising transistor channel length will help to increase the refresh rates and also improve viewing characteristics of flexible displays.

Further information

Nanowires and Nanotubes:
Issue of Materials Today: Nanowires and Nanotubes, Electronics and Photonics in one dimension, October 2006, Volume 9, Number 10

Organic semiconductors:
G. Malliaras, R. Friend, An Organic Electronics Primer, Physics Today, May 2005, pp53-58

Supervisor Maxim Shkunov

Research Group - Nano-Electronics Centre

Type - Experimental

Techniques used

  • Field-effect transistor fabrication and electrical characterisation
  • Deposition of nanomaterials thin films
  • Alignment of nanowires
  • Nano characterisation using AFM, SEM
  • Metal electrode photolithography

Student will require

A good background in either of the disciplines: electronic engineering, physics, materials, physical chemistry

  • have good hands-on and analytical skills
  • demonstrated excellent aptitude for research

Objectives

To investigate novel semiconducting nanowire nanomaterials as active layers for transparent flexible electronic components and to explore electronic properties of field-effect transistors on plastic foils based on these nanowires.

To investigate novel semiconducting nanowire nanomaterials as active layers for transparent flexible electronic components and to explore electronic properties of field-effect transistors on plastic foils based on these nanowires.

Product description

Nanotechnology has been promising breakthroughs both in the science area and also in everyday life for a number of years. Yet, we notice only limited number of products that resulted from this work. We are all familiar with sun-block creams based on oxide nanoparticles and perhaps carbon fibres in portable laptops lids. In computer chips most of electronic “building blocks” are also in nanometre-scale.

Indeed, there is a huge scope for nanoscience to enter our lives. One of the areas is flexible electronics such as proposed roll-up television screens and pull-out portable interactive web-displays. To enable such flexible displays the switching of the pixels will need to be performed by “deformable” transistors. Due to these ‘bending’ requirements traditional “rigid” single crystal silicon technology does not work, and novel semiconductor approaches are urgently required. Moreover, transparency of the display is another very attractive feature that is often required in applications like windshield/cockpit windows and head-on display.

The goal of this work is to bring nanomaterials into real world via flexible electronics route. This can be achieved by using solution processable inorganic semiconducting nanowires formulated into functional ‘inks’. These inks could be then deposited by simple solution-coating methods onto variety of substrates, including plastics to produce transparent semiconducting layers for electronic devices. Due to small aspect ratio these nanowires are fully compatible with ‘bending’ requirement.
For full flexibility the device structures are completed by depositing printable electrodes and plastic dielectric layers.

Further information

Issue of Materials Today: Nanowires and Nanotubes, Electronics and Photonics in one dimension, October 2006, Volume 9, Number 10

Research Group

Nano-Electronics Centre

TypeExperimentalTechniques used

  • Field-effect transistor fabrication and electrical characterisation
  • Deposition of nanomaterials thin films
  • Alignment of nanowires
  • Nano characterisation using AFM, SEM
  • Metal electrode photolithography

Student will require

have good background in either of the disciplines: electronic engineering, physics, materials, physical chemistr

  • have good hands-on and analytical skills
  • demonstrated excellent aptitude for research

Objectives

To investigate novel semiconducting nanowire nanomaterials as active layers for transparent flexible electronic components and to explore electronic properties of field-effect transistors on plastic foils based on these nanowires.

Supervisor - Maxim Shkunov

Research Group - Nano-Electronics Centre

Type - Experimental

Student will require:

  • To be open towards multidisciplinary research
  • Have good hands-on skills
  • Have good background in either of the disciplines: electronic engineering, physics, materials, physical chemistry

Project description

Many people suffer from partial or a complete loss of vision due to the degradation of light-sensitive receptors in retina. Restoring vision by implanting silicon based devices is very challenging due the rejection of inorganic materials by human tissues. We will explore a different approach where damaged retina photoreceptors are replaced with the ones based of organic semiconductors, which are carbon-based materials and thus are  close to human bodies composition. We will look into a feasibility of creating an artificial retina based on three-colour pixelated novel organic semiconductors with different bandgaps. A prototype device will be created using precision ink-jet printing of organic molecular inks.

Supervisor Radu Sporea

Co-supervisor - Ravi Silva

Research Group - Nano-Electronics Centre

Type - Experimental, Theoretical

Collaborators - Shanghai Jiao Tong University (China)

Techniques used:

  • Photolithography, deposition and patterning
  • Solution-processing of materials
  • Field-effect transistor fabrication and electrical characterisation
  • Electronic circuit fabrication and electrical, thermal characterisation
  • Electron microscopy (SEM, TEM), Polarised optical microscopy, AFM
  • 2D and 3D Device modelling

Student will need:

  • A good background in either of the disciplines: electronic engineering, physics, material science, physical chemistry
  • To have some computer modelling, circuit simulation or programming experience
  • Good hands-on skills
  • Able to work independently and collaboratively
  • Be open towards multidisciplinary research
  • Willing to learn how to use laboratory equipment, simulation software and other research tools

Objectives

To design, fabricate and study flexible arrays of electronic devices and circuits with improved energy efficiency, operational parameters and uniformity of performance across a large area.

Project description

The research of novel large area electronics made on flexible, transparent substrate is concerned largely with improving the same performance characteristics which are important in conventional integrated circuits: miniaturization, speed, current capability, power efficiency and reliability. However, these new technologies also possess a different set of challenges which need to be overcome before they can be commercialized: the often conflicting aspects of low-cost, high-speed manufacturing and accurate, high-yield patterning of features.

The source-gated transistor (SGT), a device invented and developed at Surrey, has a similar structure to the conventional thin-film transistor (FET) but additional properties which recommend it as a solution to the above challenges. Through its operation, the SGT is much less sensitive to variations in processing and has improved gain and power-efficiency characteristics. 

The project would focus on the design, fabrication and characterization of devices and circuits including SGT structures. Conventional techniques such as photolithography will be used along emerging fabrication process steps such as inkjet printing. The investigation will target material systems from the conventional silicon to solution-processed and nanostructured semiconductors to 2D materials such as graphene. Simulation using Silvaco Atlas will give insight into device operation. 

More information and relevant publications: 

Dr Radu Sporea's profile page.

Youtube video.

Image removed.

Large-area printed arrays of transistors

Image removed. 

Simulation of electron concentration in a semiconductor device 

Supervisor - Maxim Shkunov

Type - Experimental

Project description

Increasing energy demands for portable electronics and electric vehicles as well as the necessity for an efficient energy storage for intermittent renewable resources (wind and solar) require devices that can be charged very quickly, deliver high power density and sustain thousands of charge-discharge cycles.

Image removed.

Conventional lithium-ion batteries have high specific energy density, but suffer from short life-time and limited power density that they can deliver. Supercapacitors offer a breakthrough in energy storage area due to very high power capabilities and much longer lifetimes than batteries. At the heart of every supercapacitor is a nanostructured electrode-electrolyte interface that determines energy storage capacity of the device.

In this project we will aim to develop supercapacitors with nano-scale electrode materials, based on very high surface area composites of nanotubes/nanowires, conjugated polymers and solution processable metal-oxides. Surface ‘templating’ (as in Fig. 1) can be used to create micro-porous films followed by a growth of hierarchical nanostructures with optimised surface area to increase electrode-electrolyte interactions. We will also explore the possibilities of creating printable, flexible, and even transparent electrode supercapacitors using ink-jet printing, solvent-based coating techniques and self-assembly.

Fig.1 Example of nanostructured ‘template’ of a synthetic opal crystal surface that can be coated with conducting polymer/metal oxides/nanoparticle composites (sphere's diameter is < 200nm).

Supervisor - Maxim Shkunov

Co-supervisor - Angela Danil-de-Namor

Research Group - Nano-Electronics Centre

Type - Experimental

Collaborations - This project will be supported by Alphasense Ltd through industrial CASE scheme.

Student will require:

  • Good background in either of the disciplines: chemistry, materials, physics, electronic engineering
  • Hands-on and analytical skills
  • Excellent aptitude for research

Objectives

To develop new sensing layers based on a range of calixarene molecules that will be specific for benzene vapour and to demonstrate selective recognition of the analyte using silicon nanowire field-effect transistors as transducers.

Project description

Nanomaterials offers enormous potential for fabrication of electronic and electro-optical devices by cost-effective solution coating methods using various organic and inorganic nanoscale building blocks. Formation of electro-active molecules and nanoparticles into desired two-dimensional arrays and three-dimensional networks represents a very attractive opportunity for electronic and electro-chemical applications.

In this project we will be using a  multidisciplinary approach to design novel electronic sensors capable of selective and sensitive identification of benzene vapours. In the initial stage of the project we will focus on the development of sensing layers based a specific class of molecules - calixresorcarenes. Calixresorcarenes have demonstrated high potential for selective and sensitive detection of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene volatile organic compounds [1], and at the same time they are being insensitive to aliphatic hydrocarbons.

Molecular structure shown in Fig 1 represents a bowl like structure that has a cavity in the centre. For creating sensing layers, coatings of calixresorcarenes can be deposited on substrates to produce a matrix of nanoscale cavities formed by the calixresorcarene rings. The analyte molecules can get trapped in the cavities via weak interactions, and then can be liberated to produce a reversible sensor response. Molecular interactions can be fine tuned by varying the chemistry of the calixresorcarene matrix.  Current challenge is in designing calixresorcarene molecules with high selectivity between benzene and toluene/ xylenes.

This project will focus on the synthetic design of calixresorcarenes with selectivity between aromatics (e.g. benzene and toluene/ xylenes) by adjusting the cavity size and modifying analyte -calixresorcarene interactions via modification of pendant groups R (Fig 1). The second goal is to develop functional groups to selectively “anchor” the calixresorcarene ring onto a transducer element (silicon nanowires).

In the second part of the project we will focus on the device part of the sensor. Silicon nanowire field-effect transistors (FETs) with bottom gate structure will be functionalised with the new calixresorcarene layers. Device current-voltage characteristics will be fully analysed with and without benzene vapours and response will be analysed to determine sensitivity and selectivity of new FET-sensor devices.

References:

[1] S.M. Topliss, S.W. James, F. Davis, S.P.J. Higson, R.P. Tatam, Sensors and Actuators B143 (2010) 629–634.

Enquires should be sent to: m.shkunov@surrey.ac.uk

Supervisor Maxim Shkunov

Research Group - Nano-Electronics Centre

Type - Experimental

Student will require:

  • A good background in either of the disciplines: electronic engineering, physical chemistry, materials, physics
  • Good hands-on and analytical skills
  • Demonstrated excellent aptitude for research

Project description

Recent developments of nanotechnology are perfectly suited for applications in medicine including hyper-sensitive detection of molecules associated with various diseases. Diagnostic of various types of cancer at very early stages can save a vast number of human lives.

In this project, we will investigate the application of semiconducting inorganic nanowires with large surface to volume ratios and effectively 1D transport for highly sensitive detection of biomolecules, including cancer biomarkers and volatile organic compounds associated with cancer metabolic activities.  The nanowires will be integrated into field-effect transistors to provide potentiometric read out capabilities for the sensors, and their surfaces will be functionalised with special receptors to enable highly selective interactions with analyte molecules.

Supervisor Radu Sporea

Research Group - Nano-Electronics Centre

Type - Experimental, Theoretical

Collaborations - Shanghai Jiao Tong University (China)

Techniques used:

  • Photolithography, deposition and patterning
  • Solution-processing of materials
  • Field-effect transistor fabrication and electrical characterisation
  • Electronic circuit fabrication and electrical, thermal characterisation
  • Electron microscopy (SEM, TEM), Polarised optical microscopy, AFM
  • 2D and 3D Device modelling

Student will require:

  • Good background in either of the disciplines: electronic engineering, physics, material science, physical chemistry
  • Some computer modelling, circuit simulation or programming experience
  • Good hands-on skills
  • Able to work independently and collaboratively
  • To be open towards multidisciplinary research
  • Willing to learn how to use laboratory equipment, simulation software and other research tools

Objectives

To design, fabricate and test novel electronic devices which take advantage of the particular properties of emerging material systems and processes (speed, ease of manufacture, energy efficiency, etc.); to understand their operation through simulation and prototype fabrication and to develop a system of integrating these devices seamlessly with conventional devices and circuits.

Project description

The research of novel large area electronics made on flexible, transparent substrate is concerned largely with improving the same performance characteristics which are important in conventional integrated circuits: miniaturization, speed, current capability, power efficiency and reliability. However, these new technologies also possess a different set of challenges which need to be overcome before they can be commercialized: the often conflicting aspects of low-cost, high-speed manufacturing and accurate, high-yield patterning of features.

The source-gated transistor (SGT), a device invented and developed at Surrey, has a similar structure to the conventional thin-film transistor (FET) but additional properties which recommend it as a solution to the above challenges. Through its operation, the SGT is much less sensitive to variations in processing and has improved gain and power-efficiency characteristics. 

The project would focus on the optimization of transistor designs to the specifics of new technologies through fabrication, characterization and simulation of devices and circuits which include SGT structures. The investigation will target material systems from the conventional silicon to solution-processed and nanostructured semiconductors to 2D materials such as graphene. Conventional techniques such as photolithography will be used along emerging fabrication process steps such as inkjet printing.

More information and relevant publications: 

 

Dr Radu Sporea's profile page.

Youtube video.

Image removed.

Array of transistors made on transparent, flexible foil at Surrey

Image removed.

Simulation of the electron concentration in a semiconductor layer

Image removed.

Micrograph of a polysilicon source-gated transistor designed at Surrey and made by Philips Netherlands

Summary

Nanomaterials offers enormous potential for fabrication of electronic and electro-optical devices by cost-effective solution coating methods using various nanoscale building blocks. Formation of electro-active molecules and nanoparticles into desired two-dimensional arrays and three-dimensional networks represents a very attractive opportunity for electronic and electro-chemical applications.

Objectives

To investigate nanomaterials based sensors with FET architecture as low-cost printed electronics devices.

Details

In this project we will be using multidisciplinary approach by combining nano-materials, organic semiconductors  and chemical self-assembly of functional blocks to design novel electronic sensor arrays capable of simultaneous detection of multiple pollutants. The device fabrication methods will be developed in line with plastic electronics approaches, allowing to minimise future production costs and dramatically reduce carbon footprint.

In this project we will develop dual-gate field-effect transistors (FETs) with ultrathin top gate dielectric that can be functionalised with supramolecular systems such as  calixarenes with selective properties to environmental pollutants. The detection sensitivity is expected to be enhanced by nano-structured  semiconducting layers.  We will also investigate various deposition techniques, including atomic-layer deposition (ALD) for the fabrication of ultrathin top-gate layers.

In the long term the proposed FET-sensor devices will enable a new generation of low-cost multi-elemental sensor platform for chemical and biological monitoring.

Collaborations

  • With Industry
  • With University of Surrey Chemical Sciences

Contact us

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Address
Nanoelectronics Centre
Advanced Technology Institute
University of Surrey
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Surrey
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