Professor Christoph Teller


Chair in Retailing and Marketing, Head of the Department of Marketing and Retail Management
Venia Docendi (Business Studies), PhD, MSc
+44 (0)1483 683981
14 MS 03
Wednesday 12am-2pm; Thursday 9-10am

Academic and research departments

Surrey Business School.

Biography

Areas of specialism

Retail and Services Marketing; Retail studies; Distribution Management; Retail Operations; Logistics and Supply Chain Management; Shopper behaviour

University roles and responsibilities

  • Member of the Senior Management Group of the Surrey Business School
  • Head of the Department of Marketing and Retail Management
  • Chair in Retailing and Marketing

Research

Research interests

My teaching

Courses I teach on

Supervision

Postgraduate research supervision

My publications

Highlights

If you cannot fight them, complement them - A study into the resilience of urban retail and service agglomerations

(Paper: Adaptive resilience and the competition between retail and service agglomeration formats: an international perspective; co-authored by Steve Wood and Arne Floh and published in the Journal of Marketing Management(Taylor and Francis))

The wheel of retailing is turning, one retail format comes and another one disappears. But is it really that simple? In the conclusions of our research we argue “no”. Our research journey departed from the simple question of why consumers shop in different kinds of retail and service agglomerations (such as malls and high streets) within the same urban catchment. By doing so we focus on the competition between different agglomeration formats from the residents’ point of view.  Empirically we investigated the competitive relationship between high streets/town centres and malls across three European capital cities, i.e. Vienna, Ljubljana and Bratislava. Using surveys of 2,161 consumers resident in these three cities we find limited differences between formats in terms of the investigated drivers of competitiveness. Further we reveal a positive relationships of patronage towards both formats in all cities. The significant difference in why respondents patronise them suggest a partly complementary existence of the two types of agglomeration. We explain this apparent complementarity through the theory of adaptive resilience that has seen evolved agglomeration formats such as high streets/town centres develop to provide a differentiated offer and consumer attraction compared to enclosed malls. It is the resilience that has let the retail side of high streets evolve their service offer and thus adapt in the face of fierce competition. In other words, it seems as if it is not the death that awaits the high street but change as a consequence of its resilience. Download the paper from the publisher’s website and Research Gate). This is the link to the JMM blog on our paper.

Store managers as ambassadors of and seismographs in shopping centres

(OPEN ACCESS Paper: The Boundary Spanning of Managers within Service Networks; co-authored by Andrew Alexanderand Anne Roggeveen and published in the Journal of Business Research)

The highlights of the paper are: (1) Managers span boundaries between the parent organization, the network and customers. (2) Managers undertake representational and informational boundary spanning activities. (3) Informational include the collection, contextualization and relay of information. (4) Representational include service delivery, coordination, guarding, and communication. (5) These activities enhance customer value in and competitiveness of the network.

The research suggests a number of practical implications concerned with the communication of the boundary spanning role and its potential, the identification of boundary spanning champions and the facilitation of those who undertake this important role.

Download the paper from Elsevier for free (OPEN ACCESS) and Research Gate)

Sleeping with the enemy for the greater good

(Paper: The Impact of Competition and Cooperation on the Performance of a Retail Agglomeration and Its Stores; co-authored by Andrew Alexander and Arne Floh and published in Industrial Marketing Management

The highlights of the paper are: (1) Competition and cooperation between stores increase agglomeration performance. (2) There is a positive spill-over effect between agglomeration and store performance. (3) Cooperation increases store performance indirectly via agglomeration performance. (4) The spill-over effect nullifies competition’s negative impact on store performance. (5) Coopetition capabilities of stores enhance competitiveness of an agglomeration.

For retailers operating stores in agglomerations this research provides food for thoughts in terms of the following: The findings are a call for more cooperation in agglomerations and show the positive impact of competition in agglomerations. It concludes that coopetition is a much needed mind-set in agglomerations.

Download the paper from Elsevier (incl. a Powerpoint presentation describing the paper), the University of Surrey Repository (SRI) and ResearchGate)

“Each product that we throw away that is still consumable hurts” 

(Paper: What a Waste! Exploring the Human Reality of Food Waste from the Store Manager's Perspective, co-authored by Verena Gruber and Christina Holwegand published in the Journal of Public Policy and Marketing)

The highlights of this paper are: (1) Food waste in retail and wholesale stores is not only a contentious economic and environmental issue, it also an area of major ethical concern. (2) Top management only sees small single-digit numbers, but store managers struggle with large amounts of actual waste they need to dispose of each day. (3) Food waste is a phenomenon that has significant inherent sustainability potential, especially in the social domain when redistributing it to people in need.

A full snap-shot of the paper can be found on the Association of Marketing webpage. Download the paper from the journal’s webpage, and ResearchGate)

Why you (should) love your key suppliers.

(Paper: The Importance of Key Supplier Relationship Management in Supply Chains; co-authored by Herbert KotzabDavid Grant and Christina Holweg and published in the International Journal of Retail and Distribution Management)

The highlights of this paper are: It is important for companies to identify their key supplier relationships. Companies need to be able to differentiate between their internal and external SCM resources. Internal SCM resources affect the performance of external SCM resources. External SCM resources affect the company’s ability to manage their key supplier relationships. Effective key supplier relationship management improves overall SCM execution.

In terms of practical implications companies should focus on the performance of their external SCM resources to successfully manage their key supplier relationships. Because internal resources influence external resources, organizations should be prepared internally for supply chain partnering. Retail and manufacturing companies benefit from collaborative relationships with their suppliers.

Download the paper from the journal’s web pageUniversity of Surrey Repository (SRI) and ResearchGate)

On the afterlife of unsaleable products in stores 

(Paper: Unsaleable Grocery Products, their Residual Value and Instore Logistics; co-authored by Christina Holweg and Herbert Kotzab; published in the International Journal of Logistics and Distribution Management)

The highlights of this paper are:  Out-of-date yoghurt, dented cans, bruised fruit, curvy carrots - these products may be perfectly edible but they don’t meet customer expectations and are therefore considered waste. Could there be business-friendly alternatives to throwing these products away? One way that unsaleable products could be handled is via redistribution: (1) Internal: products are transformed and sold on fresh food counters or in-store restaurants; (2) social: products are collected by charities such as food banks; (3) Other: products are used for non-human consumption. Nevertheless, many store managers raised concerns about product liability and food safety. The administrative workload for putting redistribution processes in place could also be heavy – and some companies have strict rules about redistributing branded products as it could devalue the brand. However, most store managers foresaw few costs with social redistribution. Some thought it would save money as they would not have to remove packaging for waste disposal.

In terms of practical implications, this research recommends that retailers should determine processes and partnerships for redistribution, including guidelines for staff and systems for measurement. The way stores deal with these issues could become a sustainability measure and performance indicator, potentially saving money for retailers as well as doing social and environmental good.

Download the paper from the journal’s web page, the University of Surrey Repository (SRI) and ResearchGate)

Store Managers – The Seismographs in Shopping Centres 

(co-authored by Andrew Alexander and published in the European Journal of Marketing).

The contribution of this paper is to provide a more complete understanding of the role of the store manager as an integral actor in the shopping centre in terms of informational boundary spanning between the retail organisation, the customers and local shopping centre management. 

From a practical point of view our findings show that store managers have the potential to be informational boundary spanners and thus valuable resources to inform and give feedback to shopping centre management.

Download the paper from Emerald, the University of Surrey Repository (SRI) and Research Gate.

Publications

Burt S, Sparks L, Teller C (2010) Retailing in the United Kingdom ? a
synopsis,
In: Schnedlitz P, Morschett D, Rudolph T, Schramm-Klein H, Swoboda B (eds.), European Retail Research (ERR) 24 pp. 173-194 Gabler
This paper illustrates the structure of, and trends in, the retail market of the United Kingdom (UK). This industry analysis describes the retail environment compared to continental Europe and considers the regulatory issues which have helped form this retail environment. By using secondary data we describe concentration and consolidation tendencies and explain specific features of the UK retail market. Major trends are identified and discussed, concluding with an outlook on future developments.
Kotzab H, Grant DB, Teller C, Friis A (2012) Supply Chain Management Execution: International Insights on Antecedents and Subsequent Performance, 2012 European Research Seminar (ERS) - Proceedings Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP)
Teller C, Gittenberger E, Schnedlitz P (2013) Competing and Sleeping with the Enemy for the Greater Good ? Coopetition Between Stores in Retail Agglomerations, Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the British Academy of Management (BAM) (Contribution 213) British Academy of Management
Alexander A, Teller C (2013) Exploring the Boundary Spanning Activities of Retail Store Managers in Shopping Centres,
Teller C, Gittenberger E, Schnedlitz P (2013) Cognitive Age and Grocery Store Patronage by Elderly Shoppers, Journal of Marketing Management 29 (3-4) pp. 317-337
This paper discusses and evaluates the impact of cognitive (or self-perceived) age on grocery store patronage by elderly shoppers. Cognitive age is seen to be a more accurate reflection of changes related to age and aging than chronological age. Based on self-concept theory, the authors propose that cognitive age moderates the effects of perceptions of store attributes on satisfaction with a store. The hypotheses tests used a sample of 404 supermarket patrons aged 60 and above. The latent construct, cognitive age, was operationalised by six items: feel, look, do, interest, health and think age. The cognitive ages of our respondents proved to be significantly lower than their chronological ages. To evaluate the moderating effects, we applied the product indicator approach using variance-based structural equation modelling. The results show that the impacts of product range, manoeuvrability and atmosphere within the store on satisfaction become significantly stronger with increasing cognitive age. We conclude that cognitive age dimensions influence perceptions and, subsequently, behaviour related to store patronage and thus contribute to the understanding of the growing segment of elderly shoppers.
Teller C, Kotzab H, Grant D (2006) The Consumer Direct Services Revolution in Grocery Retailing: an exploratory investigation, Managing Service Quality Journal 16 (1) pp. 78-96 Emerald
Purpose

To provide empirical evidence and explanation of the phenomenon that providers of home delivery of groceries are still of minor importance in highly concentrated retail markets.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a critical literature review three propositions were set up. A web based survey was conducted with two prospective consumer groups for home delivery providers: time starved consumers and consumers with Internet affinity. A structural equation modeling analysis was applied in addition to uni- and bivariate analysis.

Findings

In contrast to some assumptions in the literature shopping in stores for groceries was not generally perceived to be an annoying activity. Respondents were aware of their own shopping logistics efforts in terms of spatial and temporal distance when shopping in stores but were unable to convert these efforts into costs. Any perceived inconvenience connected with shopping for groceries had no impact on respondents? willingness to pay for home delivery services or their future intentions to use such services.

Research limitations/implications

The study only investigated two specific consumer groups within highly concentrated urban grocery retail markets. However these groups may be considered typical of most western European countries and thus the study?s findings are of importance to retailers.

Practical implications

The major findings suggest that in general home delivery service may not be considered a strategic competitive advantage in grocery retail markets. Other marketing issues such as pricing, assortment and store personnel still substantially affect a consumer?s choice of retail formats. This leads to the conclusion that home delivery providers should either appeal to niche markets and/or offer additional differential criteria compared to traditional retail formats.

Originality/value

The paper argues for a different viewpoint for researchers investigating the topic of Internet-based distance retailing. Further, the reintegration of logistical tasks from consumers should not be considered detached from other format choice criteria.

Alexander A, Teller C (2013) Store Managers ? The Ambassadors of Shopping Centres, Proceedings of the 17th Conference of the European Association for Education and Research in Commercial Distribution (EAERCD) University of Valencia
This paper aims to describe and evaluate the activities of store managers related to their role as boundary spanners between customers, their retail management, and the management of the shopping centre in which their store is located. We present a conceptual framework that synthesises findings from the boundary spanning and the retail management literature. There we propose two types of boundary spanning activities: representational and informational including information relay related components. To explore the characteristics of each type of activity we conducted 34 in-depth interviews with store managers reflecting the retail tenant mix of a regional and a super-regional mall. A content analysis based on a multiple coding procedure reveals the existence of both types of activities. However, not all of our interviewees act as boundary spanners and thus undertake both informational and representational activities. Overall interviewees perceive boundary spanning activities as important for the management of shopping centre operations and marketing. The contribution of this paper is to (1) substantiate the overlooked role of store managers as boundary spanners between their retail organisation, the shopping centre and its customers (2) highlight their considerable potential to reflect upon and inform decision making in a shopping centre environment.
Teller C, Kotzab H, Grant DB (2010) Consumers as Logisticians: The Development of Consumer Logistics, Proceedings of the 22th Annual Conference for Nordic Researchers in Logistics (NOFOMA 2010) pp. 3-16 Kolding
Teller C, Kotzab H, Grant DB (2012) The relevance of shopper logistics for consumers of store-based retail formats, Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services 19 (1) pp. 59-66
This paper discusses and empirically evaluates the relevance of shopping-related logistics for consumers of store-based retail formats. Based on a literature review a conceptual model was developed and subsequently tested using a survey of more than six hundred consumers in the grocery retail sector. Respondents were those primarily responsible for grocery shopping in their households located in a highly concentrated European urban retail market. Variance based structural equation modelling reveals that shopper logistics has a major impact on the convenience of store-based shopping and partly influence consumers' perceptions of shopping related costs. Nevertheless, shopper logistics does not affect consumer behaviour in terms of the share of visits of a store. These results are moderated by age, hedonic shopping orientation, shopping frequency, average spending per trip and store format preference. We conclude that shopper logistics is relevant for consumers of grocery stores but its relevance varies between different shopper groups. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.
Holweg C, Schnedlitz P, Teller C (2009) The Drivers of Consumer Value in the ECR-Category Management Model - Critical Discussion and Empirical Evaluation, Proceedings of the 38th European Marketing Academy Conference (EMAC 2009) EMAC
Teller C (2008) The Impact of Olfactory Stimuli on Customers? Perception of and Behaviour in Shopping Malls,
Grant, D.B., Teller C, Teller, W. (2005) 'Hidden' Opportunities and Benefits in Using Web-based Business-to-Business Surveys, International Journal of Market Research 47 (6) 18854027 pp. 641-666
Kotzab H, Grant DB, Teller C, Halldorsson A (2008) Supply Chain Management and Hypercompetition, Logistics Research 1 (1) pp. 12-20 Springer Verlag
Firms nowadays face significant challenges in their operating environments, which have been
characterised in two different ways. From a strategic management perspective these environments
are in a state of hypercompetition while from a logistics or supply chain perspective these
environments require market responsiveness predicated upon agile supply chains. However, firms
must also rely on many interorganizational relationships to ensure efficient and effective
movements within their supply chains. This paper discusses the relationships among these concepts
and proposes a research framework combining aspects of the hypercompetition and responsiveness
and agility viewpoints.
Teller C (2008) Shopping Streets versus Shopping Malls - Determinants of Agglomeration Format Attractiveness from the Consumers? Point of View, International Review of Retail, Distribution and Consumer Research 18 (4) pp. 381-403 Taylor Francis
The decline of shopping streets and the rise of shopping malls have been major trends in
European retailing for decades. So far, research has failed to investigate this shift of
agglomeration format (AF) patronage from a marketing perspective, including the consumers?
point of view. This paper presents a theoretical comparison of generic similarities and
conceptual differences between shopping streets and shopping malls. Based on this
comparison the AF-specific characteristics perceived by consumers are compared and
discussed with respect to their impact on agglomeration attractiveness. This leads to the
development of a conceptual framework which is empirically tested using a web-based
survey of almost 1,000 consumers representing a typical urban central European retail
market. The relative importance of nine distinctive AF characteristics on attractiveness was
analysed using structural equation modelling. The findings proved to be quite similar for both
shopping streets and shopping malls; the retail tenant mix and atmosphere had the highest
relative importance.
Holweg C, Teller C (2012) Avoidable Food Waste in Retail Stores, Colloquium on European Retail Research. Book of Proceedings (CERR 2012) pp. 229-246 ESSCA
Teller C, Alexander A (2012) Store Managers ? The Sounding Board in Shopping Centre Environments?, Proceedings of the Academy of Marketing Conference 2012 University of Southampton
Kotzab H, Teller C (2005) Development and Empirical Test of a Grocery Retail Instore Logistics Model, British Food Journal: an international multi-disciplinary journal for the dissemination of food-related research 107 (8) pp. 594-605 Emerald
The purpose of the paper is to introduce a model of Instore Logistics for retail stores. The model attempted to give a picture of all logistics processes that are carried out within a retail outlet from an incoming dock to the check out. The model has afterwards been empirically validated by analyzing the Instore Logistics processes of dairy products in 200 stores in the Austrian grocery retail sector. The findings of the survey show typical problem areas within store operations and identify the impact of the final 50 metres in the store as a key factor impacting upon the success of retail business. The paper continues the work of Raman, DeHoratius & Ton (2001) and Cachon (2001) and the findings contribute to close the execution gap in retail operations.
Grant DB, Teller C, Kotzab H (2010) Qualitative Research in Logistics:
Theory and Practice,
Journal of Supply Chain Management: Research and Practice 4 (June) pp. 1-23
Gittenberger E, Teller C (2009) Betriebstypenspezifisches Kaufverhalten von
älteren KonsumentInnen [Store format specific shopping behaviour of elderly consumers],
In: Hanappi-Egger E, Schnedlitz P (eds.), Ageing Society - Altern in der Stadt: Aktuelle Trends und ihre Bedeutung für die strategische
Stadtentwicklung
pp. 346-394 Facultas
Dieser Beitrag widmet sich dem Spannungsfeld zwischen demografischem Wandel und Dynamik der Betriebsformen im Handel und bewegt sich konkret im Dreieck der Forschungsfelder Betriebsformen, ältere KonsumentInnen und Betriebsformenwahl. Es wird eine umfangreiche empirische Studie vorgestellt, welche die Determinanten der Betriebsformanwahl im Lebensmitteleinzelhandel von älteren KonsumentInnen (40-90 Jahre) untersucht.
Teller C, Alexander A, Floh A (2016) The Role of Cooperation and Coopetition between Nodes in Service Networks, Proceedings of the Colloquium on European Research in Retailing 2016 pp. 263-265 TBS Research Centre
Teller C, Alexander A, Floh A (2015) Network and Node Spill-over Effects in Retail Agglomerations,
Teller C, Gittenberger E, Schnedlitz P (2012) Cognitive Age and Grocery Store Patronage Behaviour of Elderly Shoppers,
Teller C, Gittenberger, E. (2011) Antecedents of Grocery Store Preference - The Case of Older Consumers in Urban Retail Settings,
Kotzab H, Grant DB, Teller C, Voelk N (2008) SCM Implementation in Organizations: an Austrian perspective, Proceedings of the 20th Annual Conference for Nordic Researchers in Logistics (NOFOMA 2008)
Floh A, Koller M, Zauner A, Teller C (2016) Multiple value dimensions spill-over - An experimental approach in a consumption system comprising a product and a service, Journal of Consumer Behaviour: an international research review
Through the customer?s eyes, wireless telecommunications are a typical example of a so-called consumption system, comprising a product and a service domain. People consume an entity in which multiple value perceptions from both subsystems (wireless service and cell phone) are gained and affect attitudes, intentions and future behaviour within and across the subsystems. Value perceptions are gained along the dimensions of functionality, economic aspects, emotions and social facets, regarding both service and product. Some of those value perceptions spill over, from product to service and vice versa, while others do not. Those that spill over affect value perceptions and loyalty intentions in the other subsystem. These results provide the basis for deriving practical implications for the marketing management of firms operating in such a consumption system. Given the presence of spill-over effects, both parties involved are advised to revise their marketing activities accordingly
Teller C, Schnedlitz P (2011) Drivers of Agglomeration Effects in Retailing ? the Shopping Mall Tenant?s Perspective, Journal of Marketing Management 28 (9-10) pp. 1043-1061 Routledge
Retail and service enterprises seek benefits and synergies from locating their stores within retail agglomerations, such as shopping streets and malls. The aim of this paper is to identify the main drivers of such synergetic or ?agglomeration effects? for tenants. A literature review reveals four sets of drivers that are related to the location, the tenant mix, the marketing, and the management of an agglomeration. Based on a survey of 217 managers representing stores that are located in five regional and four supra-regional shopping malls, we demonstrate that location-related drivers including geographical location, accessibility, and parking conditions have a the highest impact on agglomeration effects in terms of the economic success of tenants. The results were consistent amongst different types of tenants differentiated by store size, customer footfall, industry affiliation, and perceived role within the respective mall (as footfall taker or generator within the network).
Teller C, Floh A (2014) Retail Patronage and Its Antecedents ? A Meta Analysis, Proceedings of the Colloquium on European Research in Retailing 2014
Teller C, Gittenberger E (2008) Betriebsformenpräferenz von älteren
Konsumentenkohorten,
Kotzab H, Munch HM, de Faultrier B, Teller C (2010) Ecological Retail Supply Chains ? when global Goliaths become Eco-Davids, Proceedings of the 8th international meeting of logistics research (RIRL 2010)
Alexander A, Teller C, Roggeveen AL (2016) The boundary spanning of managers within service networks, Journal of Business Research 69 (12) pp. 6031-6039
© 2016 The AuthorsThis research examines how managers act as a boundary spanner in two types of boundary-spanning relationships and how their boundary-spanning activities provide support for customer value creation in service networks. Using an embedded case design in three shopping centers, the results from interviews with retail store managers and shopping center managers indicate that store managers span boundaries between both the parent organization and the shopping center and between the shopping center and customers. Analysis reveals six types of boundary-spanning activities. Four serve to represent the organization (service delivery, coordination, guarding, and external communication), while two are informational in nature (outbound information collection and relay, and inbound information collection and relay). This research highlights the wide range of activities a manager can undertake to improve the competitiveness of a company and service network by enhancing customer value.
Reiner G, Teller C, Kotzab H (2013) Analyzing the Efficient Execution of In-Store Logistics Processes in Grocery Retailing ? The Case of Dairy Products, Production and Operations Management 22 (4) pp. 924-939
In this paper, we examine in-store logistics processes for handling dairy products, from the incoming dock to the shelves of supermarkets and hypermarkets. The efficient execution of the in-store logistics related to such fast-moving, sensitive and essential items is challenging, and crucial for grocery retailers? sales, profits and image. In our empirical study we survey in-store logistics processes in 202 grocery supermarkets and hypermarkets belonging to a major retail chain in central Europe. Using a data envelopment analysis (DEA) and simulation, we facilitate process benchmarking. In particular, we identify ways of improving in-store logistics processes by showing the performance impacts of different managerial strategies and tactics. The DEA results indicate different efficiency levels for different store formats; the hybrid store format of the small hypermarket exhibits a comparatively worse performance in the analyzed execution of in-store logistics processes. The process simulation analysis reveals that the strategic and tactical design of in-store logistics processes (such as store locations/layouts, capacity management, reorder time, order period and safety stock factors) lead to substantial service performance improvements (such as higher on-shelf availability combined with reduced inventory obsolescence costs). The results also show marginal improvements in the performance figures when delivery delays and damage to products are reduced. The core contributions of this paper are to provide insights into the nature of in-store logistics processes in different store formats and to suggest a multi-analysis approach to make the performance of in-store logistics processes measureable, comparable and, consequently, manageable.
Teller C, Kotzab H, Grant DB (2012) Key Account Management and Supply Chain Management Execution, Colloquium on European Retail Research. Book of Proceedings (CERR 2012) pp. 174-295 ESSCA
Teller C (2012) Urban retail and service clusters vs. shopping malls - the agglomeration patronage behaviour of consumers in Bratislava, Ljubljana and Vienna, Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Recent Advances in Retailing and Service Science (EIRASS 2012) EIRASS
Paddision, A., Teller C, Elms, J. (2009) Place Marketing, Retail Agglomeration Attractiveness and the Place User?s Point of View, Proceedings of the 15th conference of the European Association for Education and Research in Commercial Distribution (EAERCD 2009) EAERCD
Kotzab H, Teller C, Girz HR (2009) The GS1 Databar and Its Future Application - Results from a Delphi Study, In: Schnedlitz P, Morschet D, Rudolph T, Schramm-Klein H, Swoboda B (eds.), European Retail Research (ERR) 23 pp. 77-88 Gabler
The evolution of barcode systems will enter a new stage in 2010. The GS1 DataBar will complement and consequently replace the existing EAN/UPC standards. This paper elaborates on the main conceptual differences between these two barcode generations and discusses evolving potentials of the GS1 DataBar. Based on that, results from a Delphi study are presented comprising the notions of 15 experts who represent different partners of grocery supply chains. The results from two Delphi rounds show that the respondents see an extraordinary importance of this new barcode generation for the collaboration between supply chain partners. This standard is also seen to facilitate instore-logistics processes with respect to bulk fresh food products.
Teller C, Schnedlitz P (2010) Managing Agglomeration Effects in Retailing ? the
Mall Tenant?s Perspective,
Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Recent Advances in Retailing and Service Science (EIRASS 2010) EIRASS
Holweg C, Schnedlitz P, Teller C (2009) The Drivers of Consumer Value in the ECR Category Management Model, International Review of Retail, Distribution and Consumer Research 19 (3) pp. 199-218 Taylor Francis
This paper critically evaluates the proposed structure and contents of a frequently discussed
Category Management (CM) model in the Efficient Consumer Response (ECR) context.
Based on this we present an extensive empirical study where the data from a survey of 202
household representatives are merged with their actual purchasing data taken from a
consumer purchase panel (>30,000 purchase observations). The results from an exploratory
factor analysis and subsequent multiple regression analyses show that the investigated CM
model needs to be amended by personnel and Point-of-Sale aspects as they affect
Consumer Value significantly. Finally, the investigated differences between the drivers of
Consumers Value call for including both survey and consumer purchase data and
consequently incorporate attitudinal and behavioural aspects into Category Management.
Teller C, Floh A, Kulikova A (2016) Antecedents of Online Retail Patronage ? A Meta Analysis, Proceedings of the Academy of Marketing Conference 2016 Paper 443 pp. 1-8 Newcastle Business School, Northumbria University
Teller C, Holweg C, Reiner G (2016) Food Waste, Root Causes and Store Formats, Proceedings of the Colloquium on European Research in Retailing 2016 pp. 266-268 TBS Research Centre
Teller C, Floh A (2014) Patronage Behaviour and Store based Retail Formats - A Meta Analysis, Proceedings of the Academy of Marketing Conference pp. Paper 169-Paper 169 Academy of Marketing
Teller C, Elms JR (2012) Urban Place Marketing and Retail Agglomeration Customers, Journal of Marketing Management 28 (5-6) pp. 546-567 Routledge
Through identifying the attributes of a place that have an influence on the patronage behaviour of urban retail customers, this paper presents a conceptual model that proposes direct and indirect antecedents regarding the different retail-related dimensions associated with urban place attractiveness. An empirical study was conducted whereby the model was tested by surveying approximately 500 actual customers at the time they visited a particular town centre for the purposes of shopping. The results showed that the retail tenant mix, the merchandise value, and the atmosphere had a direct impact, and the product range and the sales personnel an indirect impact upon the evaluation of attractiveness. Furthermore, a number of additional effects towards these antecedents were identified with respect to parking conditions, the non-retail tenant mix, manoeuvrability, and orientation. This revealed that retailing activities were a major driver of attractiveness for an urban place. The practical implication of these findings suggests that place marketing activities should be proactive in supporting and enabling retailers in fulfilling their roles.
Teller C (2013) Customers, retail agglomerations and urban place marketing, In: Evans JR (eds.), Planning and Implementing a Retail Strategy Henry Stewart Talks Ltd
Teller C, Kotzab H, Grant DB (2013) Managing Key Supplier Relationships in Supply Chains, Proceedings of the 17th Conference of the European Association for Education and Research in Commercial Distribution (EAERCD) University of Valencia
This paper aims to investigate how the overall implementation of SCM-related conditions within a firm affects its ability to do Key Supplier Relationship Management (KSRM) and to determine the importance of KSRM for the execution of SCM. A conceptual model is developed based on existing literature and proposes KSRM being a mediator between SCM conditions and execution. A survey of 174 managers representing different supply chain stages was used to test the model by variance-based structural equation modelling. The findings reveal that external SCM conditions directly affect the ability to do KSRM. Nevertheless, internal conditions show considerable indirect impact through external conditions and can thus be considered an indirect determinant. The ability to do KSRM in turn impacts the integration of business processes in terms of SCM execution, directly and substantially, highlighting the key role of KSRM in effective SCM. The empirical findings clearly indicate the need for supply chain managers to focus their collaboration down- but also upstream and for the development and maintenance of collaborative relationships by the focal firm with both customers and suppliers.
Teller C, Reutterer T (2008) The Evolving Concept of Retail Attractiveness:
what makes retail agglomerations attractive when customers shop at them?,
Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services 15 (3) pp. 127-143 Elsevier
This paper attempts to contribute to a more thorough understanding of the on-site (?in
vivo?) evaluation of retail agglomerations once shoppers have already made their destination
choices. To address this issue, a modification of more conventional concepts of retail
attractiveness that considers situational contexts is proposed and empirically tested. The
survey comprised more than 2,000 on-site interviews of customers of an inner city shopping
street and a competing peripheral shopping mall. The results show that the tenant mix and the
atmosphere, unlike parking and accessibility, exert a major impact on distinct dimensions of
perceived attractiveness. Furthermore, the empirical findings provide evidence that factors
characterizing aspects of the individual shopping situation significantly affect on-site
evaluation. Some methodological limitations and future research directions are also discussed.
Holweg C, Schnedlitz P, Teller C (2008) The Drivers of Consumer Value in the ECR Category Management Model - Critical Discussion and Empirical Evaluation, Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Recent Advances in Retailing and Service Science (EIRASS 2008)
Kotzab H, Reiner G, Teller C (2009) Description and Evaluation of Instore Logistics Processes, Proceedings of the 15th conference of the European Association for Education and Research in Commercial Distribution (EAERCD 2009)
Teller C, Kotzab H, Grant DB (2012) Improving the Execution of Supply Chain Management in Organizations, International Journal of Production Economics 140 (2) pp. 713-720 Elsevier
The aim of this paper is to identify areas for improving the level of supply chain management
(SCM) execution. A conceptual model was developed that proposes internal and joint SCM
conditions and the adoption of SCM processes as the main antecedents of SCM execution.
Based on a survey of 174 senior managers representing large organizations structural equation
modelling was conducted followed by a three-step importance-performance analysis. The
results show that internal SCM conditions, specifically information technology and human
resources, are the major drivers for improving the total level of SCM execution.
Teller C, Elms J, Thomson JA, Paddison AR (2010) Place Marketing and Urban Retail Agglomerations: An examination of shoppers place
attractiveness perceptions,
Journal of Place Branding and Public Diplomacy 6 (2) pp. 124-133 Palgrave MacMillan
Murray J, Elms J, Teller C (2015) Consumer Perceptions of Higher and Lower-Level Designed Store Environments, International Review of Retail, Distribution and Consumer Research 25 (5) pp. 473-489 Taylor & Francis
The role and influence of aesthetics in the consumption of store environments remains poorly understood. Little is known about how aesthetics propose substantial or adjunctive roles in consumers? store experiences. The aim of this paper is to examine consumer perceptions of store design-architecture in higher and lower-level design contexts. Building on the aesthetics, and environmental psychology literatures, our findings confirm consumers? determinations of perceptual differences in the aesthetic content contained in presented store environmental stimuli. Latent-means comparisons confirm consumers? perceptions of the presence of a higher-level design in one fast-fashion store with a lower-level design of a second store of the same retailer using a Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA). The results demonstrate the reliability and validity of the proposed constructs in confirming the presence of higher and lower-levels of design. This research thus expands on the extant number of store specification and response constructs and prospectively opens up new lines of store environments research.
Teller C, Dennis C (2011) The Effect of Ambient Scent on Consumers? Perception, Emotions and Behaviour ? a Critical Review, Journal of Marketing Management 28 (1-2) pp. 14-36 Routledge
The effect of olfactory stimuli on consumer behaviour has received little attention in marketing and retailing literature compared to other atmospheric cues. Researchers report ambiguous findings and shortcomings of measurement approaches. Based on a critical literature review, a field experiment in a regional shopping mall investigates the effectiveness of ambient scent. Before-and-after surveys of randomly selected shoppers in experimental and control groups were conducted and different experimental designs simulated. Those designs not controlling either extraneous variables or attitudinal differences between the control and experimental group reveal a positive effect on factors operationalising mall perception and consumers' emotions. The design controlling both sources of bias indicates no impact of ambient scent on the dependent variables. None of the behavioural variables were affected in any case. This paper questions prior findings on the effectiveness of ambient scent in a shopping-mall environment and calls for more rigour in investigating the effectiveness of atmospheric stimuli in general.
Teller C, Gittenberger E (2011) Patronage Behaviour of Elderly Supermarket Shoppers ? Antecedents and Unobserved Heterogeneity, International Review of Retail, Distribution and Consumer Research 21 (5) pp. 483-499 Routledge
This article investigates antecedents of grocery store format patronage behaviour of elderly shoppers. Based on a literature review, we set up a conceptual model that proposes effects between the perception of store attributes, satisfaction, patronage intention and behaviour. We test the model using a survey of more than 400 supermarket patrons aged 60 and over who live in a highly concentrated urban retail environment. Variance based structural equation modelling reveals that the product range and the price?value ratio have the most impact on patronage behaviour. Nevertheless, response based segmentation identifies unobserved heterogeneity in the overall modelling results. Unlike demographic characteristics of the respondents, the variables ?availability of a car? and ?problems in walking longer distances? explain the heterogeneity of the results between segments where significantly different impacts of accessibility and price?value ratio on patronage behaviour can be identified.
Floh A, Teller C, Bharadwaj S (2016) Revisiting the Satisfaction-Profit-Chain: A Latent Growth Mixture Model Approach, Proceedings of the Academy of Marketing Conference 2016 Paper 296 pp. 1-12 Newcastle Business School, Northumbria University
Gruber V, Holweg C, Teller C (2014) Foodwaste in Grocery Stores ? an Untapped CSR Potential in the Retail and Wholesale Sector, Proceedings of the Colloquium on European Research in Retailing 2014
Murray J, Elms J, Teller C (2015) The Role of Prototypes and Novelty in the Aesthetic Perception of Store Environments, Book of Abstracts of the Academy of Marketing Conference 2015 University of Limerick
Alexander A, Teller C (2013) Store Managers in Shopping Malls ? Boundary Spanners between Consumers, Retail and Centre Management, Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the British Academy of Management (BAM) (Contribution 204) British Academy of Management
Alexander A, Teller C (2014) Boundary Spanning Activities of Store Managers in Shopping Centres, Proceedings of the Colloquium on European Research in Retailing 2014
Alexander A, Teller C (2014) Boundary Spanning Potential of Store Managers in Shopping Centres, Proceedings of the Academy of Marketing Conference 2014 pp. Paper 162-Paper 162 Academy of Marketing
Mayer J, Kotzab H, Teller C (2016) Shopper Logistics Processes - A Critical State-of-the-Art from the Viewpoint of Consumer Value and Convenience, NOFOMA 2016 ? Proceedings of the 28th Annual Nordic Logistics Research Network Conference pp. 430-443 Turku Business School (University of Turku)
Kotzab, H., Reiner, G., Teller C (2007) Beschreibung, Analyse und Bewertung von Instore-Logistikprozessen [Describing, analysing and evaluating instore-logistics processes], Zeitschrift für Betriebswirtschaft 77 (11) pp. 1-24
Teller C, Floh A (2013) Why Do People Shop Where They Do? A meta-analysis (Key note address for the Marketing and Retail Track),
The talk provides insights into the oldest and arguably one of the most relevant questions in retail as well as marketing: Why do people shop where they do? More specifically a meta-analysis will characterise and summarise the body of knowledge on the antecedents of retail patronage behaviour. The research questions whether we as retail/marketing researchers have become more like advanced journalists constantly trying to find new and sexy but not necessarily relevant topics (for the sake of getting published) rather than working on traditional and still under explored highly relevant issues.
Murray J, Elms J, Teller C (2015) The Role of Prototypes and Novelty in the Aesthetic Perception of Higher and Lower Designed Store Environments, Proceedings of the 18th Conference of the European Association for Education and Research in Commercial Distribution (EAERCD)
Teller C, Reutterer T, Schnedlitz P (2008) Hedonic and Utilitarian Shopper Types in Evolved and Created Retail Agglomerations, International Review of Retail, Distribution and Consumer Research 18 (3) pp. 283-309 Taylor and Francis
This paper focuses on the impact of hedonic and utilitarian values of shopping on retail
agglomeration patronage issues, in particular on the shopping behaviour and the perception
of retail agglomerations. Our empirical study is based on a discussion of agglomerations?
potential to attract utilitarian and hedonic shopper types. A sample of 2,139 customers were
interviewed in a peripheral shopping mall and an inner city shopping street and confronted
with a multi-item scale operationalising shopping values as developed by Babin et al. (1994).
Using a standard fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm we identify four distinct shopper types.
The results show that hedonists are represented by a higher number of females, earn lower
individual incomes and are less educated compared to utilitarians. Interestingly, a higher
share of hedonists visited the shopping mall. Overall, they make more shopping trips to
agglomerations, stay there longer, visit more stores and ? depending on the agglomeration
format ? spend less than or the same amount as utilitarians. Finally, we see that those
customers who are attracted by agglomerations because of atmospheric and price stimuli are
typical hedonists.
Teller C (2009) Attractiveness of Retail Agglomerations: Direct and Indirect Antecedents,
Teller C, Floh A (2015) Research into retail patronage and its key antecedents ? retrospective and future views, Proceedings of the 18th Conference of the European Association for Education and Research in Commercial Distribution (EAERCD)
Teller C, Thomson A (2012) Gender Differences of Shoppers in the Marketing and Management of Retail Agglomerations, The Service Industries Journal 32 (6) pp. 961-980 Routledge
This paper aims to first identify gender differences in perception and evaluation of retail agglomerations, and second, discuss the implications of these differences for marketing and management. Based on a conceptual model 2151 agglomeration shoppers were surveyed using interviewer-administered questionnaires. Structural equation modelling revealed that accessibility, parking and infrastructure are perceived differently between gender groups. The attractiveness in terms of satisfaction, retention proneness and patronage intention was also evaluated distinctively. Nevertheless, when examining the impact of the perceived attributes on agglomeration attractiveness, there was no difference. In both settings, the retail tenant mix and the atmosphere are the main antecedents of attractiveness. Finally, an importance?performance analysis offers managers a method for prioritising their marketing efforts considering gender differences.
Teller C, Alexander A (2012) Store Managers in Shopping Centres ? sensing customer?s perceptions and informing management decisions, Colloquium on European Retail Research. Book of Proceedings (CERR 2012) pp. 136-156 ESSCA
This book chapter is the outcome of an interdisciplinary research project (law and retail research) on the generic nature and economies of shopping malls. The starting point of consideration was that there is legal uncertainty how the tenancy relationship in malls, i.e. rent vs. lease, should be considered in lease/rental contracts. The answer to this question has considerable consequences on the rights and liabilities of the owner/landlord of shopping malls and the shop owners regarding e.g. right to cancel, time limitations of the contract etc.. From the retail research point of view the question arises if shop owners just pay the rent/lease in shopping malls for the provided space or is there an add-on value they benefit from being located in a ?retail agglomerations?. The article provide in-depth conceptual insights into the different use of the term shopping mall compared to other agglomeration formats, e.g. shopping streets or other kinds of shopping centres. Furthermore, it is shown that a mall is ?more than the sum of its parts? based on the evaluation of so called agglomeration effects. The existence and impact of such benefits for both tenants and customers are investigated based on three extensive empirical studies and the analysis of secondary data.
Teller C (2013) The competition between shopping malls and urban retail and service clusters ? international insights, Proceedings of the 17th Conference of the European Association for Education and Research in Commercial Distribution (EAERCD) University of Valencia
This paper investigates the competitiveness of dominant retail and service agglomeration formats, that is urban retail and service clusters (URSC) and shopping malls. Drawing on the network and resource-based theories, a conceptual model proposes that the core resources and capabilities of such store networks affect competitiveness, measured by the patronage intentions of consumers. The model is tested in three distinctive and international urban settings (Vienna, Ljubljana and Bratislava) using web-based consumer surveys. Structural equation modelling reveals that, in all three urban settings, the major network resources affecting patronage intentions in terms of preferred URSC are atmosphere and accessibility, and in terms of preferred shopping mall, the store mix. The most substantial effect is due to the store mix in all store networks except one URSC. This insight into customers? patronage behaviour across formats will provide academics, agglomeration managers and retailers with a richer understanding of which network resources and capabilities (can) drive the competiveness of agglomerations.
Teller C, Elms, J. (2009) Agglomeration Formats, Attractiveness and Consumer Patronage, AMS, ACRA
Gruber V, Holweg C, Teller C (2016) What a Waste! Exploring the Human Reality of Food Waste from the Store Manager?s Perspective, Journal of Public Policy and Marketing 35 (1) pp. 3-25
Food waste is a major problem in industrialized nations, and thus a better understanding of this phenomenon and its inherent complexity is imperative. As gatekeeper to the food supply chain, the retail and wholesale sector is a crucial actor in the pursuit of minimizing food waste. The authors draw on the perspective of marketing as exchange to provide a holistic exploration of food waste in retail and wholesale stores while taking into account the interconnectedness of the entire food supply chain. Through 32 semistructured interviews with store managers, the authors shed light on the issues of food waste and its human reality. The findings reveal the questionable ethics of discarding food; the societal, regulatory, and systemic constraints leading to the occurrence of food waste in stores; and the resulting moral burden on store managers. Building on these factors, the authors outline public policy recommendations in the areas of education and law and provide managerial recommendations for the better management of food waste.
Teller C, Floh A, Kulikova A (2016) What Affects Online Retail Patronage - A Meta Analysis, Proceedings of the Colloquium on European Research in Retailing 2016 pp. 269-270 TBS Research Centre
Teller C, Holweg C, Kotzab H (2015) Stores, Edible Food Waste, and Social Redistribution, In: Lindgreen A, Hingley M, Angell R, Memery J (eds.), A Stakeholder Approach to Managing Food pp. 311-325 Gower Publishing Ltd
This paper aims to (1) discuss the phenomenon of food waste occurrence on a retail and wholesale stage and (2) to identify procedures for redistributing edible food waste to charitable organisations, i.e. social redistribution. Based on the food waste and retail operations literature, we investigate store operations processes related to food waste based on 32 semi-structured interviews with managers who represent five dominant retail and wholesale formats. Based on multiple coding procedures, we provide structured insights into redistribution processes for retail, wholesale, and charitable organisations. The contribution of this research is that it adds conceptual and empirical insight to the discussion of edible food waste and its social redistribution from the perspective of the distribution stage.
Holweg C, Teller C, Kotzab H (2015) Unsaleable Grocery Products, their Residual Value and Instore Logistics, International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management 46 (6/7) pp. 634-658 Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Purpose: The aims of this paper are (1) to explore the complexities of regularly implemented as well as irregularly occurring ? sometimes improvised ? instore logistics processes related to products which are declared unsaleable and (2) to identify the challenges and opportunities in managing instore logistics processes related to unsaleable products in grocery stores.
Methodology: We apply an embedded case study approach. Within each case, i.e. dominant store format, we investigate the instore logistics processes of 32 retail and wholesale stores and focus further on those processes related to products declared unsaleable. The case study research methodology comprises in-depth interviews with store and category managers, point-of-sale observations and secondary data research.
Findings: We identified four different specific instore logistics processes depending on the residual product value of unsaleable products. The analysis of these processes suggests that establishing more efficient return, disposal, recycling and, most importantly, redistribution processes leads to various benefits such as cost savings, more effective and efficient operations, better use of resources and waste reduction, while at the same time supporting charitable institutions and people in need.
Contribution: The contribution of this research is (1) to provide a better understanding of different ways of seeing and handling unsaleable products and (2) to reveal the significant importance of focusing on instore logistics beyond the point of sale with respect to the economic, ecological and social benefits to retailers, wholesalers and their stakeholder groups.
Gittenberger E, Teller C (2013) Betriebstypen des Handel - Begrifflichkeiten, Typologisierung und Entwicklungslinien [Store formats in retailing ? Terms, typologies and developments], In: Zentes J, Swoboda B, Morschett B, Schramm-Klein H (eds.), Handbuch Handel. Strategien ? Perspektiven ? Internationaler Wettbewerb [Handbook retailing. Strategies ? perspectives ? international competition] 11 pp. 215-242 Springer, Gabler
Kaum ein anderes Thema hat in der (deutschsprachigen) Handelsforschung über so lange Zeit ForscherInnen fasziniert wie jenes der Beschreibung und Entwicklung von Betriebstypen des Handels. Der gegenständliche Beitrag trägt dieser Tradition Rechnung und versteht sich als Überblick zur Thematik der Betriebstypen. Unsere Ausführungen gliedern sich in fünf Teilbereiche: Zu Beginn versuchen wir Klarheit in der Verwendung der Begriffe Betriebstypen, -formen und ?formate zu schaffen. Weiters werden gängige Typologisierungsmerkmale präsentiert und eine Zusammenschau von unterschiedlichen Betriebstypen gegeben. Es folgt eine Diskussion ausgewählter Beschreibungsansätze zu Entwicklungslinien von Betriebstypen sowie zum Thema Betriebstypenwettbewerb. Der Beitrag schließt mit kritischen Aspekten zum Stand und Nutzen der Betriebstypenforschung und zeigt mögliche zukünftige Forschungsschwerpunkte auf.
Teller C, Kotzab H, Grant DB (2011) Factors Affecting the Execution of
Supply Chain Management ? an International View,
Proceedings of the 18th European Operations Management Association (EurOMA) conference
Teller C, Kotzab H (2011) Wie leistungsfähig ist Ihre Supply Chain? So lassen sich Lieferketten analysieren und verbessern, Zeitschrift für Führung und Organisation (ZfO) 80 (2) pp. 114-120
Teller C, Wood S, Floh A (2016) Adaptive Resilience and the Competition Between Retail and Service Agglomeration Formats: An International Perspective, Journal of Marketing Management 32 (17-18) pp. 1537-1561 Taylor & Francis
This paper investigates the competitive relationship between dominant urban agglomeration formats (traditional ?evolved? town centres and ?created? shopping malls) and the drivers of competiveness in the form of key agglomeration resources (accessibility, parking condition, tenant mix, atmosphere). Based on a consumer survey (n, 2,161) across three distinctive European capital cities, co-variance based structural equation modelling reveals remarkably limited differences between formats in terms of the investigated drivers of competitiveness. Positive relationships of patronage towards both formats in all cities and the significant difference in why respondents patronise them suggest a partly complementary existence of the two types of agglomeration. We explain this apparent complementarity through the theory of adaptive resilience that has seen evolved agglomeration formats develop to provide a differentiated offer and consumer attraction compared to enclosed malls.
Teller C, Elms, J (2009) Retail Agglomerations and Urban Place Marketing: Integrating the Actual Shoppers? Point of View,
Teller C, Alexander A, Floh A (2015) Performance Spill-Over Effects between Retail Agglomerations and their Stores ? the Case of the High Street, Proceedings of the 18th Conference of the European Association for Education and Research in Commercial Distribution (EAERCD)
Teller C, Gittenberger E (2011) Antecedents of Store Format Patronage Behaviour
of Elderly Consumers - A Response Based Segmentation,
Proceedings of the 16th conference of the European Association for Education and Research in Commercial Distribution (EAERCD) EAERCD
Teller C, Gittenberger, E (2010) Grocery Store Format Patronage of Older Consumer Cohorts in Urban Retail Settings,
Kotzab H, Teller C, Grant D, Friis A (2015) Supply chain management resources, capabilities and execution, Production Planning and Control 26 (7) pp. 525-542 Taylor & Francis
This paper identifies inter- and intra-organisational management resources that determine the level of execution of inter-firm alliance supply chain management (SCM). By drawing on network and resource-based view theories, a conceptual model proposes the effects of SCM resources and capabilities as influencing factors on SCM execution. The model was tested using survey data from studies conducted in two European supply chain environments. Variance-based structural equation modelling confirmed the hypothesised hierarchical order of three proposed antecedents: internal SCM resources affect joint SCM resources, which in turn influence collaborative SCM-related processes and finally SCM execution. An importance-performance analysis for both settings shows that providing and investing in internal SCM resources should be a priority when aiming to increase SCM execution. The theoretical contribution of this paper lies in confirming that the improvement of SCM execution follows a clear pathway featuring internal supply chain resources as one of the main drivers. The practical implications of this research include the development of a prioritisation list of measures that elevate SCM execution in the two country settings.
Teller C, Gittenberger, E (2011) Cognitive Age, Older Consumers and Grocery Store Patronage Behaviour,
Schnedlitz, P., Teller C (2001) Der EuroCalculus® zur Planung der Wechselgeldbestände bei der Euro-Einführung [The EuroCalculus ? A tool to calculate the cash demand for retailers during the Euro-changeover phase], Der Markt 40 (2-3) pp. 98-109
Teller C, Kotzab H (2010) Improving the Execution of Supply Chain
Management in Organisations with the Means of Importance-Performance Analysis,
Proceedings of the 16th International Working Seminar on Production Economics 3 pp. 459-470
Brusset X, Teller C (2016) Supply Chain Capabilities, Risks, and Resilience, International Journal of Production Economics 184 pp. 59-68 Elsevier
Supply chain resilience is an operational capability that enables a disrupted or broken supply chain to reconstruct itself and be stronger than before. This paper examines resilience using the dynamic capabilities approach, grounded in the Resource-Based View of firms. The purpose of this research is to provide insights for achieving resilience by mapping the relationships between the practices, resources, and processes over which a manager has control. A survey of 171 managers is used to test a conceptual model that proposes relationship between supply chain capabilities and resilience as well as the moderating role of supply chain risks. Variance-based structural equation modeling reveals that only tighter integration between echelons and increasing flexibility lead to added resilience. The perception of supplier risk helps motivate the supply chain manager to enhance integration capabilities and thus achieve higher resilience. Furthermore, the perception of external risks to a supply chain actually reduces the effort of deploying external capabilities to obtain resilience. Overall, the findings strongly support the view that resources, routines, and capabilities provide different results in terms of resilience depending upon supply chain risk factors.
Murray John, Elms Jonathan, Teller Christoph (2017) Examining the role of store design on consumers? cross-sectional perceptions of retail brand loyalty, Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services 38 pp. 147-156 Elsevier
This paper compares new and established store design prototypes of the same retailer to examine the role of consumers? cross-sectional perceptions of retail brand loyalty. In-store surveys were administered to capture consumers? store-level perceptions towards a new store prototype and an older established prototype of the same fast fashion retailer. The data was subjected to multi-group analyzes with structural equations modeling. The findings suggest that store novelty and complexity promote both store design pleasure and retail brand loyalty outcomes. The different store designs do not, however, account for differences in brand loyalty perceptions at the overall retailer level when multi-group comparisons of both store designs are made. Consumers of newer store designs are found to possess a heightened sensitivity to price perceptions. Managerial implications of the effects of store novelty and complexity on retail brand loyalty are also presented.
Murray J, Teller C, Elms J, Murphy A (2017) Store Design Contributions to Retail Brand Loyalty Development, Proceedings of the 19th Conference of the European Association for Education and Research in Commercial Distribution (EAERCD). (USB device) Dublin Institute of Technology
Teller C, Kotzab H, Grant D, Holweg C (2016) The Importance of Key Supplier Relationship Management in Supply Chains, International Journal of Retail and Distribution Management 44 (2) pp. 109-123 Emerald
Purpose: This paper investigates the impact of key supplier relationship management (KSRM) ? understood as an aggregated supply chain management (SCM) process in the upstream direction ? on the overall level of the execution of SCM within organizations. Methodology: A conceptual model is developed from a theoretical framework and proposes the capability to do KSRM as a mediator between internal and external SCM resources and SCM execution. A survey of 174 managers representing different supply chain stages is used to test the model through variance-based structural equation modelling. Findings: The findings reveal that external SCM resources directly affect the capability to do KSRM. Nevertheless, internal resources show a considerable indirect impact through external resources and can thus be considered an indirect determinant. The capability to do KSRM in turn impacts upon the level of SCM execution, measured in terms of the integration of business processes, directly and substantially, as well as mediating the effect between SCM resources and the level of SCM execution. Value: The main contribution of this paper is to empirically demonstrate the potential of KSRM for enhancing the level of SCM execution within organizations and consequently the level of integration in supply chains, leading to higher customer and shareholder value.
Teller C, Alexander A, Floh A (2015) The impact of competition and cooperation on the performance of a retail agglomeration and its stores, Industrial Marketing Management Elsevier
Stores in retail and other service agglomerations, such as high streets and shopping malls, compete with each other for customers yet they may also cooperate with each other in relation to operational and marketing matters within the agglomeration in which they are located. The aim of this paper is to investigate the impact of both competition and cooperation, i.e. coopetition, on agglomeration and store performance. Drawing on the network debate, this paper develops a conceptual model and tests it in three distinctive agglomerations, each in an urban setting, namely first- and second-order high streets as well as an inner-city retail and service cluster. A total of 277 store managers served as key informants in our survey. Variance-based structural equation modelling reveals that both competition and cooperation improve agglomeration performance directly. Despite competition having a negative direct effect on stores? performance, the overall effect is insignificant. Cooperation affects store performance positively but only indirectly. The contribution of this paper is to reveal and substantiate the complex nature and benefits of the effects of the coopetition of stores located within agglomerations. More widely it underlines the importance of managers of agglomerations understanding the differing effects of competition and cooperation and using this understanding in their management decision making.
Prokl G, Teller C, Kotzab H, Angell R (2017) Antecedents of Truck Drivers? Job Satisfaction and Retention Proneness, Journal of Business Logistics 38 (3) pp. 184-196 Wiley
The aim of this paper is to (1) explore the antecedents of truck drivers? job satisfaction and (2) identify the impact of financial and non-financial job properties on satisfaction with the job and with one?s employer and (3) the drivers? proneness to retaining their jobs. Based on the extant literature, we develop a conceptual model that is tested using survey data for 164 truck drivers. Multiple linear and ordinal logistic regressions were used to estimate the proposed effects. The results reveal that non-financial job properties and satisfaction with one?s employer affect job satisfaction statistically significantly. Financial and non-financial job properties affect satisfaction with one?s employer whereas the former shows a lower impact compared to the latter. Satisfaction with the job and one?s employer impacts retention proneness. The contribution of this paper is to (1) add to the understanding of the factors that predict retention of truck drivers in relationship to job satisfaction and (2) highlight the different roles of financial and non-financial job properties in this specific work context.
Murray J, Teller C, Elms J, Murphy A (2017) The Role of Momentary and Longer-term Retail Brand Experiences in the Development of Retail Brand Equity in Task-orientated Store Environments, Proceedings of the 3rd International Colloquium on Corporate Branding, Identity, Image and Reputation (COBIIR) ? Current and Future Trends, Developments and Challenges
Gruber V, Holweg C, Teller C (2016) An Examination of Food Waste as a Corporate Social Responsibility of the Retail and Wholesale Sector. Rediscovering the Essentiality of Marketing, In: Petruzzellis L, Winer R (eds.), Proceedings of the 2015 Academy of Marketing Science (AMS) World Marketing Conference Proceedings of the 2015 Academy of Marketing Science (AMS) World Marketing Conference. 82 Springer: Heidelberg
Food waste is a major problem in industrialized nations. In order to develop efficient mechanisms for minimization, a better understanding of the complexities involved in food waste is necessary. This chapter takes a marketing system perspective to provide a holistic exploration of the edible food waste phenomenon on a retail and wholesale store level. By means of 32 in-depth interviews with store managers, we gain insights into the relevance of food waste occurrence, avoidance, and redistribution. The data reveals various factors influencing the occurrence of food waste along formal, informal, and philosophical antecedent classes. We find that managing edible food waste is closely connected to the triple bottom line: reducing its occurrence and enabling processes to redistribute edible food waste can create economic, ecological, and social benefits. Against this background, we propose a dormant sustainability potential in the management of food waste and advance recommendations for realizing these benefits. We suggest that food waste is a key priority area in the realm of corporate social responsibility for retail and wholesale organization. The chapter draws on a framework for public policy change and provides a discussion about how different processes can help reduce edible food waste among various market actors.
Brusset X, Teller C, Kotzab H (2017) Guest Editorial: The store and the Internet of Things: retail operations,
marketing and beyond,
International Journal of Retail and Distribution Management 45 (7/8) pp. 686-688 Emerald
Galipoglu E, Kotzab H, Teller C, Yumurtac1 Hüseyino?lu I, Pöppelbuß J (2017) Omni-Channel Retailing Research ? State of the art and intellectual foundation, International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management 48 (4) pp. 365-390 Emerald
Purpose: The aims of this paper are to (1) identify, evaluate and structure the research that focuses on omni-channel retailing from the perspective of logistics and supply chain management, and (2) to reveal the intellectual foundation of omni-channel retailing research.
Methodology: The paper applies a multi-method approach by conducting a content-analysis-based literature review of 70 academic papers. Based on the reference lists of these papers, we performed a citation and co-citation analysis based on the 34 most frequently cited papers. This analysis included multidimensional scaling, a cluster analysis and factor analysis.
Findings: Our study reveals the limited consideration of logistics and supply chain management literature in the foundation of the omni-channel retailing research. Further, we see a dominance of empirical research as compared to conceptual and analytical research. Overall, there is a focus on the Western retail context in this research field. The intellectual foundation is embedded in the marketing discipline and can be characterised as lacking a robust theoretical foundation.
Value: The contribution of this research is identifying, evaluating and structuring the literature of omni-channel research and providing an overview of the state of the art of this research area considering its interdisciplinary nature. This paper thus supports researchers looking to holistically comprehend, prioritise and use the underpinning literature central to the phenomena of omni-channel retailing. For practitioners and academics alike, our findings can trigger and support future research and an evolving understanding of omni-channel retailing.
Kotzab H, Teller C, Grant D, Sparks L (2011) Antecedents for the Adoption and Execution of Supply Chain Management, Supply Chain Management ? an International Journal 16 (4) pp. 231-245 Emerald
Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual model that includes drivers of supply chain management (SCM) adoption and execution identified in the literature, provide a set of measurement scales that operationalise constructs within this model, empirically verify a hierarchical order of antecedents that affects the adoption and execution of SCM, and assist management by providing a focus on those SCM conditions and processes that need to be prioritised to increase successful SCM adoption and execution.

Design

The conceptual model is tested empirically through a survey of 174 senior supply chain managers representing the biggest organisations within a central European country.

Findings

Using structural equation modelling the hypothesised hierarchical order of three proposed antecedents are verified: ?internal SCM conditions? that affect ?joint or external SCM conditions? which in turn influences collaborative ?SCM-related processes?. Firms that adopt these steps should enjoy a rigorous and appropriate road to the full execution of SCM.

Research limitations

The survey results reflect the views of large organisations in a countryspecific supply chain setting.

Practical implications

The findings provide a hierarchical focus for financial, personnel and management initiatives to increase integration within a supply chain and improve competitiveness.

Originality/value

The major contribution of this paper is that it provides empirical proof of the antecedents that affect the adoption and execution of SCM.

Kotzab H, Munch H, de Faultrier B, Teller C (2011) Environmental Retail Supply Chains: when global Goliaths become environmental Davids, International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management 39 (9) pp. 658-681 Emerald
Purpose

The purpose of this paper is (1) to develop a scale that evaluates the environmental elements in retail supply chains and (2) to examine the environmental supply chain management initiatives of the world?s largest 100 retailing companies.

Methodology

The empirical evaluation has been executed through an investigative approach applying a web-scan framework which included the analysis of websites and publicly published documents such as annual reports and Corporate Social Responsibility reports.

Findings

We identified 34 environmental sustainability initiatives which we grouped into eight categories. They refer to ?fundamental environmental attitude?, ?use of energy?, ?use of input material?, ?product?, ?packaging?, ?transport?, ?consumption?, and ?waste?. The level of environmental supply chain management can be characterised as very operational and very short-term oriented (= green operations). Long-term oriented green-design-initiatives were hardly observed. Furthermore, the specific environmental activities of three retailers from Denmark, France and the United Kingdom were compared.

Research limitations

The empirical study investigates supply chain operations of retailers and excludes other areas of retail management. The results are based on material that is published by the respective companies and thus do not comprise internal reports.

Value of paper

The main contribution of this paper is to test the proposition that global retailers follow the path of the ?greening Goliaths?, where environmental sustainability becomes a quasi industry standard for the ecological sustainability transformation of global retailing.

Aastrup J, Kotzab H, Grant D, Teller C, Bjerre M (2008) A Model for Structuring Efficient Consumer Response Measures, International Journal of Retail and Distribution Management 36 (8) pp. 590-606 Emerald
Purpose:

The purpose of this paper is to propose a model which structures and links different types of efficient consumer response (ECR) measures; it does so by considering the use of both quantitative or ?hard? and qualitative or ?soft? measures in ECR, emphasizing the importance and causal role of ?soft? measures throughout the ECR process.

Methodology/Approach:

This paper reviews the ECR and performance measurement literature and proposes a model that explains linkages from intra-organizational, interorganizational and industry prerequisites through ECR activities to ECR outcomes; and highlights the role of performance, behavioural, attitude and capability measures. Two extant studies from Austria and Denmark are examined in the context of the model to exemplify some of its features.

Research limitations/implications:

The proposed model is presented for primarily future investigation; thus there is no empirical study in this paper other than a comparison of the two extant studies to support some constructs and variables. However, the model represents a structure that can guide future research on more specific ECR elements.

Practical implications:

The model makes a practical contribution by providing a structure from which measurement or scorecard systems can be established.

Originality/value of the paper:

The model makes a theoretical contribution by providing an overall structure to link different areas of ECR research such as barriers for ECR implementation, and specific ECR concepts, activities, and their outcomes.

Kotzab H, Teller C (2003) Value-adding Partnerships and Co-opetition Models in the Grocery Industry, International Journal of Physical Distribution and Logistics Management 33 (3) pp. 268-281 MCB UP Ltd
Leading representatives of the European grocery industry formed the European Efficient Consumer Response (ECR-)Initiative in 1995. The goal of this strategic alliance is set to reengineer the way business is done in the industry by implementing cooperative strategies between retailer and manufacturer in order to fulfill consumer wishes better, faster and at less cost. ECR appears thereby in many facets, from a ?simple? dyadic value-adding partnership to a sophisticated form of co-opetition, where Supply Chain members have both relationship types ? competition and cooperation ? at the same time. Our paper discusses these issues first on theoretical bases and then presents empirical results of a comprehensive analysis within a selected European ECR-initiative showing the success factors of managing ECR-partnership relations.
Wünsche S, Kotzab H, Teller C, Bourlakis M (2018) Key Competences of Logistics and SCM Professionals ? The Lifelong Learning Perspective, Supply Chain Management: an International Journal 23 (1) pp. 50-64 Emerald

Purpose

This paper identifies specific qualifications and competences required within the field of logistics and supply chain management from the perspective of lifelong learning and hierarchical level. It also reveals a hierarchy level-specific job profile for logistics and supply chain management jobs based on the European Framework for Key Competences and the German Federal Employment Agency.

Methodology

A review of the literature on competences and skills in the field of logistics is combined with an analysis of 832 job postings by means of content analyses and thematic mapping.

Findings

The academic literature discusses more than 280 skills and competences related to the job profile of logistics and supply chain managers. The majority of these skills represent social skills. Analyses of job postings show significant differences in the required portfolio of skills and competences depending on the hierarchical level of the position. Contrary to the literature, job postings include more cognitive competences and meta-competences than social skills.

Value

The first contribution of our research is that competences were examined from the perspective of lifelong learning, revealing how this is applied in the field of logistics. The second is that our conceptual framework can be utilised to compare skills and competences between different hierarchical levels. The third contribution refers to identifying a set of skills and competences different to what had been presented in the literature.

When a company identifies an unavoidable service failure, they do not always inform customers or initiate activities to minimise the negative effects. Thus, customers are exposed to service failures and companies are faced with the issue of recovering. This thesis studies the effect of pre-failure service recovery on customer satisfaction. Also, the joint effect of pre-failure recovery and criticality on customer satisfaction is examined.
A critical review of the literature on service failure and recovery is presented drawing upon the underlying theories of disconfirmation of expectations theory, justice theory, and prospect theory. From this, a conceptual model and hypotheses have been developed and put forward. A non-probability quota sample is employed. Using a 2x2x2 scenario based experimental design, T-Tests and 2-way between-groups analysis of variance are used.
Results show pre-failure recovery can aid the service recovery process and heighten customer satisfaction in the face of inevitable unavoidable service failure. This research adds a new step in the service recovery process extending the literature on service failure, service recovery, and criticality.
The implications of this research are that through using pre-failure service recovery, the damage of an inevitable unavoidable service failure can be minimised resulting in higher satisfaction. Consumers appreciate honesty and upfront service providers regardless of whether they are in a time critical situation or not. A practical implication is that before considering compensation, service providers could use pre-failure recovery as this may be enough for recovery (and if not then it will make recovery easier and the provider could offer less compensation). This could save providers money.
Future studies could consider other forms of pre-failure recovery and their effect on satisfaction. The present study could be extended into other service sectors. Furthermore, researchers could examine pre-information and post-information to compare the two and their effects on satisfaction.
Teller C, Alexander A (2014) Store Managers ? The Seismographs in Shopping Centres, European Journal of Marketing 48 (11/12) pp. 2127-2152 Emerald
Purpose: The aim of this paper is to investigate (1) the link between store managers? evaluation of how customers assess a shopping centre and their own evaluation of the centre and, based on that, (2) the relevance of store managers in reflecting upon and informing the management and marketing practices of the local shopping centre management. Methodology: A conceptual model is developed based on the network and boundary-spanning theories. The model is tested using a web-based survey of 217 managers, representing stores located in shopping malls, and by applying covariance-based structural equation modelling. Findings: The study reveals store managers to be engaging in a significant information-processing pathway, from customers? evaluation of the shopping centre (as perceived by the store manager) to their own evaluation of the centre in terms of managerial satisfaction and loyalty. Research limitations: The empirical study focuses exclusively on shopping malls and thus does not consider other shopping centre forms such as town centres and retail parks. Practical implications: This paper concludes that store managers have the potential to be informational boundary spanners and thus valuable resources to inform and give feedback to shopping centre management. Originality: The contribution of this paper is to provide a more complete understanding of the role of the store manager as an integral actor in the shopping centre in terms of informational boundary spanning between the retail organisation, the customers and local shopping centre management.
Teller C, Holweg C, Reiner G, Kotzab H (2018) Retail Store Operations and Food Waste, Journal of Cleaner Production 185 pp. 981-997 Elsevier
This paper focuses on the issue of food waste from a retail and store operations perspective, with the aim to identify the root causes of food waste occurrence at a retail store level across different store formats and product categories. To achieve this, we first conducted case studies, including semi-structured interviews with store managers. This exploratory research involved 28 cases across dominant retail store formats (i.e., super- and hypermarkets and discount and convenience stores). The results along with secondary data research underlie a process simulation modeling approach that quantifies the impact of selected root causes of food waste by considering the dependencies between them. Finally, we conduct semi-structured interviews with 12 food waste experts to confirm findings of the case studies and simulations and to delineate the practical implications of our research and the related solutions. Our findings show that the root causes of food waste are related to undesirable customer behavior and erratic demand, inefficient store operations and replenishment policies, and elevated product (quality) requirements of both retail organizations and customers. Root causes and their impacts differ across store formats and product categories. Furthermore, the interdependencies between the root causes in the different spheres of responsibility and influence (i.e., customers, the store, and the parent organization) are evident. The paper contributes to the literature by providing detailed understanding of retail operations related to the occurrence of food waste across store formats at a product-category level and revealing pathways for preventing and reducing the occurrence of food waste at a retail store level.
Blut M, Teller Christoph, Floh Arne (2018) Testing Retail Marketing-Mix Effects on Patronage: A Meta-Analysis, Journal of Retailing 94 (2) pp. 113-135 ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC
Retailers have always worked to establish close relationships with customers through the retail marketing mix. Thus, the literature has a long tradition of testing the effects of various instruments on retail patronage. This meta-study synthesizes prior research into one comprehensive framework. We use 14,895 effect sizes reported by more than 239,000 shoppers from 41 countries extracted from 350 independent samples, to test the impact of 24 marketing-mix instruments on retail patronage. Specifically, we investigate the direct and indirect effects of these instruments on store satisfaction, word of mouth, patronage intention, and behavior. Product and brand management related instruments display the strongest effects on most outcome variables, whereas price, communication, service and incentive management instruments display effects on selected outcomes. Distribution management turns out to be of secondary importance. However, the effectiveness of these instruments depends on the specific shopping context (food/non-food, shopping frequency, single store/agglomeration, hedonic/utilitarian), the retail environment (gross domestic product, country innovativeness, retail sales share, retail employment, Internet era), and the employed method (participant type, study design, data source). Specifically, we reveal most differences for hedonic shopping environments and developed countries. Also, the store?s advertising and atmosphere have gained importance in the Internet era, while purchase incentives, in-store orientation, and store location have lost relevance. This study contributes to a synoptic understanding of the comparable effectiveness of retail marketing instruments on retail patronage. It offers insights into the effectiveness of marketing-mix instruments and provides guidance on whether and when to invest in them. It also presents an agenda for future research on marketing-mix instruments.
Kotzab H, Teller C, Grant D, Friis A (2014) Supply Chain Management Resources, Capabilities and Execution, Production Planning and Control Taylor and Francis
This paper identifies inter- and intra-organisational management resources that determine the level of execution of inter-firm alliance supply chain management (SCM). By drawing on network and resource-based view theories, a conceptual model proposes the effects of SCM resources and capabilities as influencing factors on SCM execution. The model was tested using survey data from studies conducted in two European supply chain environments. Variance-based structural equation modelling confirmed the hypothesised hierarchical order of three proposed antecedents: internal SCM resources affect joint SCM resources, which in turn influence collaborative SCM-related processes and finally SCM execution. An importance-performance analysis for both settings shows that providing and investing in internal SCM resources should be a priority when aiming to increase SCM execution. The theoretical contribution of this paper lies in confirming that the improvement of SCM execution follows a clear pathway featuring internal supply chain resources as one of the main drivers. The practical implications of this research include the development of a prioritisation list of measures that elevate SCM execution in the two country settings.

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