Nicole Tabasso

Dr Nicole Tabasso


Lecturer in Economics
PhD in Economics
+44 (0)1483 682787
18 AD 00
see personal website

Academic and research departments

School of Economics.

Biography

Biography

Nicole received her undergraduate degree in Finance and Law from the University of Applied Science in Frankfurt in 2004. She then moved to the UK where she received an MSc in Economics and Econometrics from the University of Essex in 2006. She received her PhD in Economics from the same institution in 2011, where she also held a lectureship from 2010 to 2011. She joined the University of Surrey as a full-time lecturer in September 2011.

Research interests

Nicole's research interests are in microeconomic theory, in particular network theory. Her most recent research focuses on the role of social networks in the diffusion of information.For more details on her research, current research ideas and papers, please visit her personal webpage.

Teaching

  • ECO1019: Principles of Macroeconomics
  • ECO3043: Topics in Macroeconomics

My publications

Publications

Tabasso N (2012) Endogenous Growth and Consumption Aggregation: DP 07/12, Department of Economics, University of Surrey
Tabasso N (2015) Diffusion of Multiple Information: On Information Resilience and the Power of Segregation, Climate change and Sustainable Development Feem Press
We introduce two pieces of information, denoted memes, into a diffusion process in which memes are transmitted when individuals meet and forgotten at an exogenous rate. At most one meme can be transmitted at a meeting, which introduces opportunity costs in the process. Individuals differ according to which meme thy find more interesting, and that is the one they transmit if they face a choice. We find that both memes survive under the same parameter values, and that relative interest is the main determinant in the number of people informed of a meme in the long run. We apply our framework to analyze the impact of segregation and find that segregation leads to polarization. Segregation also reduces the overall number of people informed in the long run. Our final set of results shows that agents are more likely to prefer segregation if their information preferences are more extreme, if they have few social contacts, or if they prefer a meme that is preferred by only a small fraction of the population.
Ghiglino C, Tabasso N (2015) The dynamics of innovations and citations, Economics Letters 131 pp. 94-97
© 2015 Elsevier B.V.We present a model in which patent citations occur as new ideas are produced from combinations of existing ideas. An idea's usability in this process is represented as an interval in a variety space of ideas, whose length determines the likelihood of citation. This process endogenously derives exponential aging of patents, which is consistent with empirical observations. The endogeneity of aging sets our process apart from the standard preferential attachment literature.
Ghiglino C, Tabasso N (2010) Are Patent Citations Driven by Quality?,
The present paper builds a simple model of patent citations not based on the rich-get-richer
aspect of preferential attachment. In our model the dynamics of citations are driven by known
heterogeneities in the applicability of existing patents and aging. The model matches closely the
hazard rates of citations for the vast majority of patents in a random sample of patents granted
by the USPTO between 1975 and 1999. Furthermore, we show that the long run distribution of patent citations is well fitted when the distribution of applicability across patents follows a
Gamma-distribution.
We also discuss the possibility that popularity of patents might influence citation decisions if
innovators are not perfectly informed about patents' applicability. We find that popularity
matters but the size of the effect is very small. Finally, the possibility to distinguish between citations to patents within the same class and to different classes allows us to show that the magnitude of the influence of popularity is increasing in technological distance.
Ghiglino C, Tabasso N (2014) Risk Aversion in a Model of Endogenous Growth,
Despite the evidence on incomplete financial markets and substantial risk being borne by innovators, current models of growth through creative destruction predominantly model innovators? as risk neutral. Risk aversion is expected to reduce the incentive to innovate and we might fear that without insurance innovation completely disappears in the long run. The present paper introduces risk averse agents into an occupational choice model of endogenous growth in which insurance against failure to innovate is not available. We derive a clear negative relationship between the level of risk aversion and long run growth. Surprisingly, we show that in an equilibrium there exists a cut-off value of risk aversion below which the growth rate of the mass of innovators tends to a strictly positive constant. In this case, innovation persists on the long run and consumption per capita grows at a strictly positive rate. On the other hand, for levels of risk aversion above the cut-off value, the economy eventually stagnates.
Tabasso N, Ghiglino C (2016) Risk Aversion in a Model of Endogenous Growth, Journal of Mathematical Economics. 64 pp. 30-40 Elsevier
Despite the evidence on incomplete ?nancial markets and substantial risk being borne by innovators, current models of growth through creative destruction predominantly model innovators? as risk neutral. Risk aversion is expected to reduce the incentive to innovate and we might fear that without insurance innovation completely disappears in the long run. The present paper introduces risk averse agents into an occupational choice model of endogenous growth in which insurance against failure to innovate is not available. We derive a clear negative relationship between the level of risk aversion and long run growth. Surprisingly, we show that in an equilibrium there exists a cut-o? value of risk aversion below which the growth rate of the mass of innovators tends to a strictly positive constant. In this case, innovation persists on the long run and consumption per capita grows at a strictly positive rate. On the other hand, for levels of risk aversion above the cut-o? value, the economy eventually stagnates.