Dr Bob Patton

Lecturer in Clinical Psychology & Lead for the Drugs, Alcohol & Addictive Behaviours Research Group

Qualifications: PhD MSc BSc (Hons) DipIC CPsychol AFBPsS CSci

Email:
Phone: Work: 01483 68 6861
Room no: 17 AD 02

Office hours

Monday - Wednesday 9.00 – 12:00, 14:00 – 16:00 (please book)

Further information

Biography

Dr Bob Patton is a lecturer in Clinical Psychology at the University of Surrey and Visiting Research Fellow in Addiction at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) working on the NIHR SIPs Jr Alcohol Research Program, as a Principal Investigator with responsibility for Patient & Public involvement. Bob leads the School of Psychology Drugs, Alcohol & Addictive Behaviours Research Group and is a member of the Impact, Engagement & Marketing team.

Bob is a Chartered Psychologist (Health, Research), Associate Fellow of the British Psychological Society, NIHR Investigator, Fellow of the Software Sustainability Institute and a Chartered Scientist. During the 1990s he worked for the Home Office Drugs Prevention Initiative as a consultant, and then as a research associate in health promotion for the University of Northumbria, before moving to London where he has worked for Kings College London (medical education), Royal Holloway (violence prevention), London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (cancer communication), Imperial College London (alcohol) and for King’s Health Partners where he was the Health Services Research Coordinator for Addictions between 2004 - 2011.  Bob has recently worked at Surrey as Research Tutor on the PsychD Clinical Psychology Training programme and an Academic Advisor on the MSc in Counselling Supervision & Consultation. He has also served as the Vice-Chair (Research) for the BPS Division for Teachers and Researchers and been a member of the BPS Research Board.

His current academic interests include the development of mental health smartphone Apps, Alcohol Identification and Brief Advice, physical health needs of IDUs, Health Professionals training in alcohol interventions, Hepatitis immunisation and the relationships between drug misuse and sexual health / risk taking. His PhD thesis explored brief interventions for alcohol misuse, and his book based on that and related studies is available here. Academia aside, Bob is the Director of Short Term Solutions Ltd. (Recruitment agency) and AdApped Ltd. (Addictions Apps), plays keyboards in a variety of musical collectives, manages two studio based bands and has also worked as a nurse, youth worker, mystery shopper and IT consultant. He currently lives on a boat.

Research Interests

Alcohol

Addiction

Brief Interventions

Early Identification

E-learning

Use of software in research

eHealth

Research Collaborations

King’s College London, University of Newcastle,

Publications

Journal articles

  • Patton R, Green G. (2017) 'Alcohol Identification and Intervention in English Emergency Departments'. Emergency Medicine Journal,

    Abstract

    Aims In the Emergency Department (ED), alcohol identification and brief advice is an effective method of reducing consumption and related harms. Our objective was to conduct a national survey of English EDs to determine current practice regarding alcohol identification and provision of brief advice, and to compare changes in activity to a previous National Survey conducted in 2011. Methods This was a cross-sectional survey of all consultant led Emergency Departments in England. Results Of 180 departments, 147 (81.6%) responded. All departments may question adult patients about their alcohol consumption, with many (63.6%) asking all patients over 18 as part routine care, and using a formal screening tool (61.4%). The majority of departments asked young people (aged 11-17) about their consumption (83.8%), but only 11.6% did so as a part of routine practice. Compared to the 2011 survey, there have been significant increases in routine screening among adults (+15.9%, CI: 4.16-27.18, p=0.006), General Practitioners being informed about patients alcohol related presentations (+10.2%, CI: 0.64-19.58, p=0.028) and access to an Alcohol Health Worker or a Clinical Nurse Specialist (+13.4%, CI: 3.64-22.91, p=0.005). Modest (non-significant) changes were also found in access to training on brief advice (+9.7%) and the use of formal screening questions on adult patients (+9.7%). Conclusion Alcohol screening together with referral or intervention is becoming part of routine practice in England. Compared to our previous national survey, increases in alcohol screening and intervention activity are demonstrated, with improvements in routine questioning (among adults), the number of General Practitioners being informed about alcohol related attendances, provision of training, access to specialist services and the use of formal screening tools.

  • Coulton S, Dale V, Deluca P, Gilvary E, Godfrey C, Kaner E, McGovern R, Newbury-Birch D, Patton R, Parrot S, Perryman K, Phillips T, Shepherd J, Drummond C. (2017) 'Screening for At-Risk Alcohol Consumption in Primary Care: A Randomized Evaluation of Screening Approaches'. Alcohol and Alcoholism, 52 (3), pp. 312-317.

    Abstract

    Aims The aim of the study was to explore the relative efficiency and effectiveness of targeted versus universal screening for at-risk alcohol use in a primary care population in the UK. Methods The study was a randomized evaluation of screening approach (targeted versus universal) for consecutive attendees at primary care aged 18 years or more. Targeted screening involved screening any patient attending with one of the targeted presentations, conditions associated with excessive alcohol consumption: mental health, gastrointestinal, hypertension, minor injuries or a new patient registration. In the universal arm of the study all presentations in the recruitment period were included. Universal screening included all patients presenting to allocated practices. Results A total of 3562 potential participants were approached. The odds ratio of being screen positive was higher for the targeted group versus the universal group. Yet the vast majority of those screening positive in the universal group of the study would have been missed by a targeted approach. A combination of age and gender was a more efficient approach than targeting by clinical condition or context. Conclusions While screening targeted by age and gender is more efficient than universal screening, targeting by clinical condition or presentation is not. Further universal screening is more effective in identifying the full range of patients who could benefit from brief alcohol interventions, and would therefore have greater public health impact.

  • Donoghue K, Rose H, Boniface S, Deluca P, Coulton S, Gilvary E, Kaner E, McGovern R, Newbury-Birch D, Patton R, Phillips T, Maconochie I, Russell I, Strang J, Drummond C. (2017) 'Alcohol consumption, early onset drinking and health-related consequences in adolescents presenting at Emergency Departments in England'. Journal of Adolescent Health, 60 (4), pp. 438-446.

    Abstract

    Globally, alcohol use is the leading cause of ill health and life years lost in adolescents, although its clinical impact is often overlooked, particularly in England where most research is based in schools. This study aims to examine the prevalence of alcohol consumption and the association between alcohol consumption and age of onset with health and social consequences among adolescents presenting to emergency departments (EDs). Methods Consecutive attenders (n = 5,576) aged 10–17 years at 10 EDs were included. Information was collected on general health and functioning, quality of life, alcohol use, and alcohol-related health and social consequences. Results Nearly 40% of adolescents reported the consumption of alcohol that was more than a sip in their lifetime. Age of the first alcohol consumption before the age of 15 years was associated with tobacco use (p < .001), lower quality of life (p = .003), and evidence of an alcohol use disorder (p = .002). It was also associated with general social functioning (problems with conduct p = .001 and hyperactivity p = .001) and alcohol-related health and social consequences (accident p = .046, problems with a parent p = .017, school p = .0117, or police p = .012). Conclusions Rates of alcohol consumption in adolescents presenting to the ED were similar to those reported in schools in England and globally. Associations of alcohol consumption and earlier onset of drinking with poorer health and social functioning were observed. The ED can offer an opportunity for the identification of hazardous alcohol use in adolescents.

  • Odeigah OW, Olley B, Patton R . (2017) 'Nigeria: A country in need of an alcohol strategy'. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs,
    [ Status: Accepted ]

    Abstract

    Harmful alcohol use is the leading casual factor in over 200 diseases and accounts for 3.3 million deaths annually. In recognition of the importance of alcohol control policies in reducing harmful alcohol use, the World Health Assembly enacted ‘the global strategy to reduce the harmful use of alcohol’ (WHO, 2010). Ten policy and intervention areas were provided to guide development, implementation and monitoring of alcohol control policies in WHO member states.

  • Fincham-Campbell S, Kimergård A, Wolstenholme A, Blackwood R, Patton R, Dunne J, Deluca P, Drummond C. (2017) 'A national survey of assertive outreach treatment services for people who frequently attend hospital due to alcohol related reasons in England'. Alcohol and Alcoholism,
    [ Status: Accepted ]

    Abstract

    Aims: To characterise England’s alcohol assertive outreach treatment (AAOT) services for people who frequently attend hospital due to alcohol related reasons according to their concordance with six core AAOT components.

    Methods: A cross-sectional national survey using structured telephone interviews with health professionals examining 6 essential AAOT components. High-level AAOT services were those that delivered 5 or more components, mid-level 3 to 4 components, low-level AAOT services 2 or less.

    Results: The analysis included 37 services that were classified according to their concordance with the 6 AAOT components. Six were identified as high-level AAOT services, 13 as mid-level AAOT services and 18 as low-level services. Extended support covering housing, mental and physical health over and above alcohol consumption was the most commonly delivered AAOT component provided. Having a multidisciplinary team was the least observed component, delivered in 33% high-level AAOT services and in 15% mid-level AAOT services. None of the low-level AAOT services had a multidisciplinary team.

    Conclusions: Access to AAOT services developed to support high-cost and high- needs frequent hospital attenders varies across the nation. Further research, service evaluation and AAOT implementation should focus on essential AAOT components rather than self-defined labels of AAOT.

  • Troup L, Andrzejewski JA, Braunwalder JT, Torrence RD. (2016) 'The relationship between cannabis use and measures of anxiety and depression in a sample of college campus cannabis users and non-users post state legalization in Colorado'. PeerJ,

    Abstract

    As part of an ongoing research program into the relationship between cannabis use and emotion processing, participants were assessed on their level of cannabis exposure using the Recreational Cannabis Use Examination, a measure developed specifically to assess cannabis use in Colorado post state legalization. Three groups were created based on self-reported use: a control group who have never used, a casual user group and a chronic user group. Each participant also completed two measures of mood assessment, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Relationships between cannabis use groups and scores on these measures were then analyzed using both correlations and multivariate analysis of variance. Results indicate a relationship between casual cannabis use and scoring highly for depressive symptomatology on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. There were no significant relationships between cannabis use and scores on the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory.

  • Patton R . (2016) 'Should alcohol limits for men and women really be the same?'. The Conversation,

    Abstract

    The UK’s new alcohol guidelines advise that men and women shouldn’t drink more than 14 units of alcohol a week. Previous advice for the British drinker presented a higher threshold for men, so this represents a considerable change. So what was the evidence that the limits should not take gender into account?

  • Patton R, Joubert E. (2016) 'Telling your patients to cut down on alcohol: does it work?'. TRENDS IN UROLOGY & MEN’S HEALTH, 7 (2), pp. 18-20.

    Abstract

    Men are more likely to abuse alcohol than women and it is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in men. In this article, the authors describe how simple interventions are particularly effective in men and how drinking is often a defence mechanism against psychological distress.

  • Patton R. (2015) 'Commentary on Bertholet et al. (2015): Proceed, with caution'. ADDICTION, 110 (11), pp. 1744-1745.
  • Patton R, Boniface S. (2015) 'Prevalence of Hazardous Drinking Among UK 18-35 Year Olds; the Impact of a Revision to the AUDIT Cut Score'. ALCOHOL AND ALCOHOLISM, 51 (3), pp. 281-282.
  • Patton R, Donoghue K. (2015) 'Web-delivered personalised normative feedback for college students on alcohol consumption and sexual situations reduces alcohol-related risky sexual behaviour.'. Evid Based Nurs, 18 (3), pp. 84-84.

    Abstract

    Alcohol use is associated with an increase in RSB among young adults. University students who engage in these activities overestimate the prevalence of RSB and alcohol use among their peers. PNF is an effective intervention known to reduce alcohol consumption and consequences, and may also reduce RSB. While there is evidence that web-based PNF for alcohol is effective, there is a need to test its impact on RSB.

  • Deluca P, Coulton S, Alam MF, Cohen D, Donoghue K, Gilvarry E, Kaner E, Maconochie I, McArdle P, McGovern R, Newbury-Birch D, Patton R, Phillips C, Phillips T, Russell I, Strang J, Drummond C. (2015) 'Linked randomised controlled trials of face-to-face and electronic brief intervention methods to prevent alcohol related harm in young people aged 14-17 years presenting to Emergency Departments (SIPS junior).'. BMC Public Health, England: 15

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Alcohol is a major global threat to public health. Although the main burden of chronic alcohol-related disease is in adults, its foundations often lie in adolescence. Alcohol consumption and related harm increase steeply from the age of 12 until 20 years. Several trials focusing upon young people have reported significant positive effects of brief interventions on a range of alcohol consumption outcomes. A recent review of reviews also suggests that electronic brief interventions (eBIs) using internet and smartphone technologies may markedly reduce alcohol consumption compared with minimal or no intervention controls. Interventions that target non-drinking youth are known to delay the onset of drinking behaviours. Web based alcohol interventions for adolescents also demonstrate significantly greater reductions in consumption and harm among 'high-risk' drinkers; however changes in risk status at follow-up for non-drinkers or low-risk drinkers have not been assessed in controlled trials of brief alcohol interventions. DESIGN AND METHODS: The study design comprises two linked randomised controlled trials to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of two intervention strategies compared with screening alone. One trial will focus on high-risk adolescent drinkers attending Emergency Departments (Eds) and the other will focus on those identified as low-risk drinkers or abstinent from alcohol but attending the same ED. Our primary (null) hypothesis is similar for both trials: Personalised Feedback and Brief Advice (PFBA) and Personalised Feedback plus electronic Brief Intervention (eBI) are no more effective than screening alone in alcohol consumed at 12 months after randomisation as measured by the Time-Line Follow-Back 28-day version. Our secondary (null) hypothesis relating to economics states that PFBA and eBI are no more cost-effective than screening alone. In total 1,500 participants will be recruited into the trials, 750 high-risk drinkers and 750 low-risk drinkers or abstainers. Participants will be randomised with equal probability, stratified by centre, to either a screening only control group or one of the two interventions: single session of PFBA or eBI. All participants will be eligible to receive treatment as usual in addition to any trial intervention. Individual participants will be followed up at 6 and 12 months after randomisation. DISCUSSION: The protocol represents an ambitious innovative programme of work addressing alcoh

  • Patton R, Rahim M. (2015) 'The association between shame and substance use in young people: a Systematic Review'. 3:e737 Edition. PeerJ,

    Abstract

    Background. Shame has been associated with a range of maladaptive behaviours, including substance use. Young people may be particularly vulnerable to heightened shame sensitivity, and substance use is a significant problem amongst UK adolescents. Although there appears to be a relationship between shame and substance use, the direction of the relationship remains unclear. Aim. The purpose of this study was to undertake a systematic review of the literature relating to shame and substance use in young people. Method. Five electronic databases were searched for articles containing terms related to ‘adolescence,’ ‘shame’ and ‘substance use.’ Six articles were included in the final analyses. Results. Adverse early experiences, particularly sexual abuse, predict shame-proneness, and substance use is a mechanism by which some individuals cope with negative feelings. In general, there is a dearth of literature investigating the shame-substance use relationship in adolescent samples. The available literature associates shame-proneness with poorer functioning and suggests that it may potentially lead to psychopathology and early-onset substance use. Scant attention has been paid to the cognitive and emotional processes implicated. Further research is required to ascertain the strength of the shame-substance use relationship in young people and to develop appropriate interventions for this population.

  • Rahim M, Patton R. (2014) 'The association between shame and substance misuse in young people: A review of the literature'. PeerJ PrePrints,

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Shame has been associated with a range of maladaptive behaviours, including substance abuse. Young people may be particularly vulnerable to heightened shame sensitivity, and substance abuse is a significant problem amongst UK adolescents. Although there appears to be a relationship between shame and substance abuse, the direction of the relationship remains unclear. AIM: We reviewed the literature relating to shame and substance abuse amongst young people. METHOD: Five electronic databases were searched for articles containing terms related to ‘adolescence’, ‘shame’ and ‘substance abuse’. Of the two hundred and twelve articles identified in the first sweep, six were included in the final analyses. RESULTS: Sexual abuse is indicated as a predictor of shame-proneness. Substance abuse may be a mechanism by which individuals cope with negative feelings. In general, there is a lack of literature investigating the shame-substance abuse relationship among adolescents. The available literature associates shame-proneness with poorer functioning and suggests that this may lead to psychopathology and early-onset substance misuse. Scant attention has been paid to the cognitive and emotional processes implicated. Further research is required to ascertain the strength of the shame-substance abuse relationship in young people and to develop appropriate interventions for this population.

  • Newbury-Birch D, Coulton S, Bland M, Cassidy P, Dale V, Deluca P, Gilvarry E, Godfrey C, Heather N, Kaner E, McGovern R, Myles J, Oyefeso A, Parrott S, Patton R, Perryman K, Phillips T, Shepherd J, Drummond C. (2014) 'Alcohol screening and brief interventions for offenders in the probation setting (SIPS Trial): a pragmatic multicentre cluster randomized controlled trial.'. Alcohol Alcohol, England: 49 (5), pp. 540-548.

    Abstract

    To evaluate the effectiveness of different brief intervention strategies at reducing hazardous or harmful drinking in the probation setting. Offender managers were randomized to three interventions, each of which built on the previous one: feedback on screening outcome and a client information leaflet control group, 5 min of structured brief advice and 20 min of brief lifestyle counselling.

  • Drummond C, Deluca P, Myles J, Patton R, Perryman K, Phillips T, Coulton S, Bland M, Dale V, Godfrey C, Parrott S, Cassidy P, Crawford M, Gilvarry E, McGovern R, Newbury-Birch D, Kaner E, Heather N, Oyefeso A, Shepherd J, Touquet R. (2014) 'The effectiveness of alcohol screening and brief intervention in emergency departments: A multicentre pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial'. PLoS ONE, 9 (6)

    Abstract

    Background: Alcohol misuse is common in people attending emergency departments (EDs) and there is some evidence of efficacy of alcohol screening and brief interventions (SBI). This study investigated the effectiveness of SBI approaches of different intensities delivered by ED staff in nine typical EDs in England: the SIPS ED trial. Methods and Findings: Pragmatic multicentre cluster randomized controlled trial of SBI for hazardous and harmful drinkers presenting to ED. Nine EDs were randomized to three conditions: a patient information leaflet (PIL), 5 minutes of brief advice (BA), and referral to an alcohol health worker who provided 20 minutes of brief lifestyle counseling (BLC). The primary outcome measure was the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) status at 6 months. Of 5899 patients aged 18 or more presenting to EDs, 3737 (63·3%) were eligible to participate and 1497 (40·1%) screened positive for hazardous or harmful drinking, of whom 1204 (80·4%) gave consent to participate in the trial. Follow up rates were 72% (n = 863) at six, and 67% (n = 810) at 12 months. There was no evidence of any differences between intervention conditions for AUDIT status or any other outcome measures at months 6 or 12 in an intention to treat analysis. At month 6, compared to the PIL group, the odds ratio of being AUDIT negative for brief advice was 1·103 (95% CI 0·328 to 3·715). The odds ratio comparing BLC to PIL was 1·247 (95% CI 0·315 to 4·939). A per protocol analysis confirmed these findings. Conclusions: SBI is difficult to implement in typical EDs. The results do not support widespread implementation of alcohol SBI in ED beyond screening followed by simple clinical feedback and alcohol information, which is likely to be easier and less expensive to implement than more complex interventions. Trial Registration: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN 93681536 © 2014 Drummond et al.

  • Patton R, Deluca P, Kaner E, Newbury-Birch D, Phillips T, Drummond C. (2014) 'Alcohol screening and brief intervention for adolescents: the how, what and where of reducing alcohol consumption and related harm among young people.'. Alcohol Alcohol, England: 49 (2), pp. 207-212.

    Abstract

    The aim of the study was to explore the evidence base on alcohol screening and brief intervention for adolescents to determine age appropriate screening tools, effective brief interventions and appropriate locations to undertake these activities.

  • Patton R. (2014) 'Alcohol-related presentations to the emergency department among young people: some concerns'. EMERGENCY MEDICINE JOURNAL, 31 (3)
  • Patton R. (2014) 'Children's alcohol use is also a safeguarding issue.'. BMJ, England: 349
  • Donoghue K, Patton R, Phillips T, Deluca P, Drummond C. (2014) 'The effectiveness of electronic screening and brief intervention for reducing levels of alcohol consumption: a systematic review and meta-analysis.'. J Med Internet Res, Canada: 16 (6)

    Abstract

    Electronic screening and brief intervention (eSBI) has been shown to reduce alcohol consumption, but its effectiveness over time has not been subject to meta-analysis.

  • Patton R, Marshall J. (2014) '"Physician heal thyself": results from a single-hospital pilot survey of alcohol consumption among general hospital patients and staff.'. J Stud Alcohol Drugs, United States: 75 (1), pp. 189-190.
  • Patton R, Vohra M. (2013) 'Hazardous drinking among patients attending a minor injuries unit: A pilot study'. Emergency Medicine Journal, 30 (1), pp. 72-73.

    Abstract

    Excessive alcohol consumption increases the likelihood of accidental injury. This pilot study reports on the prevalence of hazardous drinkers presenting to a minor injuries unit. The proportion of hazardous drinkers is broadly similar to that found in emergency departments, suggesting that such units could also host alcohol intervention and brief advice activities.

  • Patton R, O'Hara P. (2012) 'Alcohol: signs of improvement. The 2nd National Emergency Department survey of Alcohol Identification and Intervention activity'. Emergency Medical Journal,
    [ Status: Accepted ]

    Abstract

    • objectives – To conduct a survey of current alcohol identification and brief advice activity in English Emergency Departments, and to compare the results to the previous survey conducted in 2007. • methodology – Cross sectional survey of all 187 Emergency Departments in England • results – Significant increases (p<0.001) in the proportion of departments routinely asking about alcohol, using a screening questionnaire, offering help / advice for alcohol problems and having access to Alcohol Health Workers or Clinical Nurse Specialists. More than half of all departments indicated that they had an “alcohol champion”, and this was significantly associated with access to training on both identification and provision of brief advice (p<0.001). Departments that routinely asked questions were the most likely to use a formal screening tool (P<0.05) and the Paddington Alcohol Test was the most frequently used measure (40.5%). • conclusions – There have been significant improvements in ED alcohol identification and brief advice activity since 2007 in line with the recommendations of the Royal College of Physicians, Department of Health and NICE guidelines. English EDs are beginning to maximise the likelihood of identifying patients who may benefit from further help or advice about their alcohol consumption, and are able to offer access to specialist staff who can provide appropriate interventions

  • Patton R, Deluca P, Drummond C, Coulton S, Perryman K, Phillips T, Touquet R, Crawford M, Heather N, Kaner E. (2012) 'INDIVIDUAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL DETERMINANTS OF ALCOHOL SCREENING AND BRIEF INTERVENTION IMPLEMENTATION IN EMERGENCY DEPARTMENTS (SIPS-ED)'. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 36 (S1), pp. 11A-303A.
  • Patton R, Henriquez-Gonzalez O. (2012) 'Prevalence of tobacco, cocaine and alcohol use amongst patients attending for Methadone-Maintenance Therapy in a rural setting'. Journal of Substance Use: for nursing, health and social care,

    Abstract

    Background: Patients receiving methadone-maintenance therapy appear more likely to have other substance-use disorders than do people in the general population and often fail to receive treatment for these conditions. Coexisting substance-use disorders are associated with poor health outcomes amongst current or former heroin users. The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of the use of tobacco, cocaine and alcohol amongst patients attending for community-based methadone-maintenance therapy. Methods: Cross-sectional survey of patients prescribed methadone as to treat opiate dependence. Results: Prevalence of tobacco, cocaine and alcohol use in the sample were 91.18%, 11.18% and 42.01%, respectively. Most respondents were found to be dependent upon tobacco. In contrast, most patients were found to have no dependence upon alcohol. In total, 145 patients (85.80%) had Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test PC (AUDIT PC) scores below 5, indicating lower risk drinking, while the remaining 24 (14.20%) had AUDIT scores of 5 or above, indicating higher risk drinking. Conclusions: There are higher rates of self-reported tobacco, cocaine and alcohol use disorders amongst methadone-maintained individuals than those reported in individuals from the general population. The findings illustrate the importance of identifying coexisting tobacco, cocaine and alcohol use disorders in methadone-maintained patients, since these issues can significantly impair patients’ quality of life and affect treatment outcomes.

  • Mohiddin A, Devall A, Hicyilmaz M, McCormick G, Crompton J, Patton R. (2012) 'STI clinic demonstrates potential as a location to provide education to parents.'. Sex Transm Infect, England: 88 (1), pp. 69-70.
  • Mohiddin A, Devall A, Hicyilmaz M, McCormick G, Crompton J, Patton R. (2012) 'STI clinic demonstrates potential as a location to provide education to parents'. Sexually Transmitted Infections, 88 (1), pp. 69-70.
  • Patton R, Vohra M. (2011) 'Hazardous drinking among patients attending a minor injuries unit: a pilot study.'. Emergency Medicine Journal, 30 (1), pp. 72-73.

    Abstract

    Excessive alcohol consumption increases the likelihood of accidental injury. This pilot study reports on the prevalence of hazardous drinkers presenting to a minor injuries unit. The proportion of hazardous drinkers is broadly similar to that found in emergency departments, suggesting that such units could also host alcohol intervention and brief advice activities.

  • Patton R, Ihezue N. (2011) 'Alcohol and drug problems in older people'. BMJ: British Medical Journal,
  • Patton R, Shute J, Hinchley G, Ranzetta L. (2009) 'Efficacy of alcohol screening in the accident and emergency department managed by reception staff: a pilot study.'. Emerg Med J, England: 26 (6), pp. 424-425.

    Abstract

    Hazardous levels of alcohol consumption are associated with presentations to the accident and emergency department. Although screening and brief interventions are effective at reducing levels of hazardous drinking, a low number of departments has implemented such a strategy. Time constraints upon clinical staff have been cited as one reason for this inertia. This pilot study demonstrates that self-completion of screening materials is possible before a patient is seen by clinical staff.

  • Patton R, Keaney F, Brady M. (2008) 'Drugs, alcohol and sexual health: opportunities to influence risk behaviour.'. BMC Res Notes, England: 1

    Abstract

    Alcohol and drug consumption can affect judgment and may contribute towards an increased likelihood of engaging in risky sexual behaviour. In this cross sectional survey of clients attending STI services levels of drug and alcohol use were assessed using two standardised drug and alcohol screening instruments (the PAT and the SDS).

  • Patton R, Strang J, Birtles C, Crawford MJ. (2007) 'Alcohol: a missed opportunity. A survey of all accident and emergency departments in England.'. Emerg Med J, England: 24 (8), pp. 529-531.

    Abstract

    To determine the extent to which the recommendations of the alcohol harm reduction strategy for England and the Choosing Health white paper for the provision of screening and brief interventions for hazardous and harmful drinkers have been adopted by accident and emergency departments.

  • Cathcart S, Patton R, Hickman M, Hendry C, Ashworth M. (2007) 'Comparing population estimates for drug users, the prevalence of blood-borne viruses and the provision of services in one London borough: Evidence of a gap in provision?'. DRUGS-EDUCATION PREVENTION AND POLICY, 14 (3), pp. 205-215.
  • Patton R, Smythe W, Kelsall H, Selemo FB. (2007) 'Substance use among patients attending an accident and emergency department [3]'. Emergency Medicine Journal, 24 (2), pp. 146-146.
  • Barrett B, Byford S, Crawford MJ, Patton R, Drummond C, Henry JA, Touquet R. (2006) 'Cost-effectiveness of screening and referral to an alcohol health worker in alcohol misusing patients attending an accident and emergency department: a decision-making approach.'. Drug Alcohol Depend, Ireland: 81 (1), pp. 47-54.

    Abstract

    We present the cost and cost-effectiveness of referral to an alcohol health worker (AHW) and information only control in alcohol misusing patients. The study was a pragmatic randomised controlled trial conducted from April 2001 to March 2003 in an accident and emergency department (AED) in a general hospital in London, England. A total of 599 adults identified as drinking hazardously according to the Paddington Alcohol Test were randomised to referral to an alcohol health worker who delivered a brief intervention (n = 287) or to an information only control (n = 312). Total societal costs, including health and social services costs, criminal justice costs and productivity losses, and clinical measures of alcohol consumption were measured. Levels of drinking were observably lower in those referred to an AHW at 12 months follow-up and statistically significantly lower at 6 months follow-up. Total costs were not significantly different at either follow-up. Referral to AHWs in an AED produces favourable clinical outcomes and does not generate a significant increase in cost. A decision-making approach revealed that there is at least a 65% probability that referral to an AHW is more cost-effective than the information only control in reducing alcohol consumption among AED attendees with a hazardous level of drinking.

  • Patton R, Crawford M, Touquet R. (2005) 'Hazardous drinkers in the accident and emergency department--who attends an appointment with the alcohol health worker?'. Emerg Med J, England: 22 (10), pp. 722-723.

    Abstract

    To identify factors that predict attendance at a brief assessment and referral session among patients identified as hazardous drinkers while being treated in an accident and emergency department.

  • Patton R, McCormick R. (2005) 'Problem alcoholic drinkers: detecting and intervening'. 32 Edition. New Zealand Family Physician, 3, pp. 191-194.
  • Williams S, Brown A, Patton R, Crawford MJ, Touquet R. (2005) 'The half-life of the 'teachable moment' for alcohol misusing patients in the emergency department'. DRUG AND ALCOHOL DEPENDENCE, 77 (2), pp. 205-208.
  • Crawford MJ, Patton R, Touquet R, Drummond C, Byford S, Barrett B, Reece B, Brown A, Henry JA. (2004) 'Screening and referral for brief intervention of alcohol-misusing patients in an emergency department: a pragmatic randomised controlled trial.'. Lancet, England: 364 (9442), pp. 1334-1339.

    Abstract

    Alcohol misuse is highly prevalent among people attending emergency departments, but the effect of intervention by staff working in these departments is unclear. We investigated the effect of screening and referral of patients found to be misusing alcohol while attending an emergency department.

  • Huntley JS, Patton R, Touquet R. (2004) 'Attitudes towards alcohol of emergency department doctors trained in the detection of alcohol misuse'. Annals of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, 86 (5), pp. 329-333.

    Abstract

    Introduction: Alcohol misuse creates an immense burden for society, with problem drinkers too often constituting a neglected group. The Paddington Alcohol Test (PAT) is a useful screening tool in emergency departments. Methods: Using a questionnaire, we assessed the attitudes of 127 emergency department junior doctors over 5 years to misuse detection using the PAT, in a centre with a well-defined protocol for detection and referral. Results: The majority (99%) thought early detection important, and the emergency department an appropriate place for screening (98%). Most thought that treatment could be successful (98%), and the PAT a useful instrument for early detection (87%). However, 63% reported that they misuse alcohol at least once a month and 30% once or more a week. Discussion and Conclusions: Junior doctors trained in the detection of alcohol misuse have a very positive view of this work. However, this professional insight is in marked contrast to their personal misuse of alcohol. This paradox reflects the entrenched culture of alcohol use in the medical profession, perhaps learnt at medical school.

  • Patton R, Crawford M, Touquet R. (2004) 'Brief intervention for hazardous drinking among people attending an accident and emergency department'. Proceedings of the British Psychological Society, 12 (2), pp. 181-181.

    Abstract

    Objectives: To examine the effect of referral to an alcohol health worker (AHW) on levels of alcohol consumption, A&E attendance, psychiatric morbidity and quality of life among patients identified as hazardous drinkers Design: Single Blind Pragmatic Randomised Controlled Trial. Methods: 5240 patients attending the accident and emergency department (AED) over a oneyear period were screened using the Paddington Alcohol Test (PAT). Participants randomised to the Treatment condition were given an AHW appointment and the HEA leaflet ‘Think about drink’. Control participants were given the leaflet, but no appointment. At six months alcohol consumption (PAT and Form 90 AQ) and psychiatric morbidity (GHQ-12); at 12 months alcohol consumption and quality of life (EQ-5D) were assessed. Hospital data was used to determine re-attendance. An analysis of costs associated with screening patients, attending an AHW session and AED attendance was undertaken. Analysis: 599 of 1167 hazardous drinkers met inclusion criteria and were randomised. Thirty-six per cent were lost to follow-up. Data was analysed on an intention to treat basis. Participants in the Treatment condition had significantly lower levels of consumption than Controls at six-month follow-up. Treatment participants attended the AED significantly less often than Controls; a number needed to treat analysis found that every two patients referred to the AHW prompted one less re-attendance. There were no significant differences between groups on the GHQ-12 or EQ-5D. Conclusions: Screening and brief intervention for alcohol misuse in the AED is feasible and results in lower levels of alcohol consumption over the following 12 months. Reduced alcohol consumption is associated with lower levels of reattendance in the AED, which in turn offsets the costs of screening and providing brief intervention.

  • Patton R, Crawford M, Touquet R. (2004) 'Hazardous drinkers in the accident and emergency department--who accepts advice?'. Emerg Med J, England: 21 (4), pp. 491-492.

    Abstract

    To identify factors that predict acceptance of brief advice among people consuming excessive alcohol in an accident and emergency (A&E) department.

  • Patton R, Hilton C, Crawford MJ, Touquet R. (2004) 'The Paddington Alcohol Test: a short report.'. Alcohol Alcohol, England: 39 (3), pp. 266-268.

    Abstract

    The Paddington Alcohol Test, designed to screen for alcohol related problems amongst those attending Accident and Emergency Departments, is presented in a slightly modified form. It concords fairly well with the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), but can be administered in about one fifth of the time taken to administer AUDIT. Its scoring of units is rapid and specific to the UK. PAT is recommended for use in UK Accident and Emergency Departments.

  • Beich A, Thorsen T, Rollnick S, Patton R, Rukstalis M. (2004) 'Excessive drinkers may benefit from brief interventions, but screening in general practice for case finding is not efficient'. Evidence-Based Healthcare, 8 (1), pp. 10-11.
  • Patton R, Touquet R. (2003) 'Screening in brief intervention trials targeting excessive drinkers in general practice: systematic review and meta-analysis. Rapid response - ‘The Teachable Moment’ – opportunistic intervention for alcohol misuse.'. BMJ: British Medical Journal, 327
  • Patton R, Crawford MJ, Touquet R. (2003) 'Impact of health consequences feedback on patients acceptance of advice about alcohol consumption'. EMERGENCY MEDICINE JOURNAL, 20 (5), pp. 451-452.
  • Patton R, Crawford M, Touquet R. (2003) 'Reducing alcohol misuse in patients attending an accident and emergency department: A randomised controlled trial'. Proceedings of the British Psychological Society, 11 (2), pp. 281-281.

    Abstract

    Objectives: To examine the effects at one year of referral for brief intervention by an alcohol health worker (AHW) on levels of alcohol consumption, psychiatric morbidity and quality of life among patients attending an accident and emergency department (AED) with alcohol related problems. Design: Randomised controlled trial. Methods: An AED doctor using the Paddington Alcohol Test (PAT) screened patients who presented to the AED. All those identified as misusing alcohol and meeting the inclusion criteria were asked if they would accept help aimed at assisting them to reduce their alcohol intake. Those randomised to Treatment were given a card which detailed the time and place of an appointment to discuss alcohol consumption with an AHW. Participants were also given a copy of a leaflet ‘Think About Drink’ Those randomised to Control were given the leaflet but no appointment. At baseline demographic details were collected together with details of current level of alcohol consumption. At six months a telephone interview was conducted in order to assess alcohol consumption and psychiatric morbidity (GHQ-12). At 12 months alcohol consumption (using PAT and Form 90), psychiatric morbidity and quality of life using Euroqol EQ-5D were measured. Results: 5242 patients screened, 1159 identified as hazardous drinkers (22 per cent), 659 consented and randomised. Data collection at six-months completed (77 per cent). Data collection at 12 months is ongoing. Conclusions: This pragmatic study should provide evidence of the worth of screening and brief interventions for alcohol misuse applied in the AED and offer guidance on the conduct of psychological research within busy hospital settings.

  • Patton R, Touquet R. (2003) 'General practitioner screening for excessive alcohol use. Rapid response - Brief screening tools should be used in general practice'. BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, 326, pp. 337-337.
  • Patton R, Crawford M, Touquet R. (2002) 'Emergency departments are well placed to identify alcohol misuse problems'. 324 Edition. BMJ: British Medical Journal, 7332
  • Patton R, Touquet R. (2002) 'The Paddington Alcohol Test'. British Journal of General Practice, 52 (474), pp. 59-59.
  • Patton R. (2001) 'Dying for a drink: The role of the Accident and Emergency Department'. BMJ: British Medical Journal,

Conference papers

  • Patton R. (2016) 'e-IBA: Development of new technology to reduce adolescent alcohol use'. Frontiers Media Frontiers in Public Health, London: 2nd Behaviour Change Conference: Digital Health and Wellbeing

    Abstract

    Background: The SIPS Jr. Research programme (1) is funded by the NIHR to screen for alcohol use and deliver effective brief interventions to 14-17yr olds presenting to Emergency departments. Ongoing Patient & Public Involvement (PPI) work has identified a need for paperless screening / baseline data collection and an enthusiasm for interventions based on mobile technologies. Two recent systematic reviews by the research team (Patton et al, 2014; Donovan et al, 2014) support the use of such technology to identify and intervene with adolescent drinkers (2, 3). Description: Together with a specialist software development company we have developed a bespoke data collection / participant management tool for the iPad which is currently being used as part of an ongoing RCT (4), with data being collected from 10 Emergency Departments in England (London, Hull and the North East). This method of data collection has already demonstrated considerable cost savings and is popular with participants and research staff (over 6000 participants recruited to date in the current trial and earlier prevalence study). We have developed an interactive WebApp to reduce alcohol consumption and related harm among adolescents. This works in conjunction with the data collection tool to provide personalised feedback to users, to record ongoing consumption and to provide access to information and advice presented in an engaging and age appropriate format. Conclusion: Both the Research Tool and e-intervention have been developed and refined by the research team working collaboratively with the Web Developer, PPI groups and local youth organisations. The use of this technology is effective and cost effective.

  • Deluca P, Coulton S, Perryman K, Bland M, Cassidy P, Crawford M, Gilvarry E, Godfrey C, Heather N, Kaner E, Myles J, Newbury-Birch D, Oyefeso A, Parrott S, Patton R, Phillips T, Shepherd J, Touquet R, Drummond C. (2012) 'INDIVIDUAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL DETERMINANTS OF ALCOHOL SCREENING AND BRIEF INTERVENTION IMPLEMENTATION IN EMERGENCY DEPARTMENTS (SIPS-ED)'. WILEY-BLACKWELL ALCOHOLISM-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH, San Francisco, CA: 35th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Research-Society-on-Alcoholism (RSA) 36, pp. 162A-162A.
  • Patton R. (2011) 'SIPS ED Outcomes'. Gateshead: College of Emergency Medicine Annual Scientific Conference
  • Deluca P, Drummond C, Coulton S, Perryman K, Bland M, Cassidy P, Crawford M, Gilvarry E, Godfrey C, Heather N, Kaner E, Myles J, Newbury-Birch D, Oyefeso A, Parrott S, Patton R, Phillips T, Shepherd J, Touquet R. (2010) 'CHALLENGES AND SOLUTIONS IN IMPLEMENTING SCREENING AND BRIEF INTERVENTIONS FOR HAZARDOUS ALCOHOL USE IN ACCIDENT AND EMERGENCY DEPARTMENTS'. ALCOHOLISM-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH, 34 (6), pp. 294A-294A.
  • Patton R. (2009) 'Alcohol Training implementation and outcomes'. Reducing Alcohol-Related Hospital Admissions in Lewisham
  • Patton R. (2007) 'Alcohol problems in the AED – researching the interventions'. National Alcohol Liaison conference
  • Patton R, Thompson P, Marshall EJ. (2005) 'Integrating alcohol screening and intervention in an inner-city accident & emergency department – from theory to practice'. Edinburgh: FAEM Scientific Meeting

    Abstract

    The alcohol harm reduction strategy for England and subsequent White Paper highlight the problems associated with excessive alcohol consumption, and emphasise the role that A&E should play in the identification and management of such patients. Kings College Hospital is a busy inner-city A&E with a turnover of 105,000 patients per year. Based on the data from the alcohol strategy, at least 40,000 of these patients are hazardous drinkers and would benefit from some intervention to reduce their alcohol consumption. Following the example of good practice set at St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington described by Crawford et al (Lancet, 2004), we have started to implement an alcohol screening policy in our department. In a department that has no previous history of targeting alcohol related presentations, we wanted to explore how best to introduce such a policy. Our aim is to develop a set of guidelines that will inform other departments seeking to introduce such policies themselves. Data on screening has been collected using the A&E computer system and the impact of teaching sessions for clinical staff (Drs and Nurse Practitioners) as well as the introduction of a paper-based system has been assessed. Interviews with clinical staff illustrate the barriers and facilitators to implementing this policy. Additionally our substantive baseline data also allow for a rapid review of the impact of changes to licensing hours on alcohol related attendances.

  • Patton R. (2004) 'Referral of alcohol misusing patients attending an accident & emergency department'. Society for the Study of Addiction Annual Symposium
  • Patton R. (2004) 'Reduction of alcohol consumption among patients attending an accident & emergency department'. British Psychological Society Annual Conference
  • Patton R. (2003) 'Reducing alcohol misuse among patient attending an accident & emergency department: A randomised Controlled Trial'. BPS Annual Conference

Books

  • Davis P, Patton R, Jackson S. (2017) Addiction: Psychology and Treatment. Wiley-Blackwell
    [ Status: Accepted ]

    Abstract

    Addiction: Psychology and Treatment brings together leading psychologists to provide a comprehensive overview of the psychology of addictions and their treatment across specialities and types of services. Emphasises the use of several approaches including CBT, psychodynamic and systemic and family treatments, and consideration of the wider picture of addictions As well as the theories, gives a clear overview of the application of these models Reflects the very latest developments in the role played by psychological perspectives and interventions in the recovery agenda for problem drug and alcohol users

  • Patton R. (2012) Alcohol and the Emergency Department: Interventions to reduce harm. Germany : Lambert Academic Press

Book chapters

  • Patton R. (2011) 'Educational interventions for alcohol use disorders'. in Tyrer P, Silk KR (eds.) Effective Treatments in Psychiatry Cambridge University Press , pp. 56-61.
  • Patton R, Brower KJ, Bellefleur S, Crawford M. (2008) 'Educational interventions for alcohol use disorders'. in Tyrer PJ, Silk KR (eds.) Cambridge Textbook of Effective Treatments in Psychiatry New York, USA : Cambridge University Press , pp. 315-320.

    Abstract

    Educational interventions are designed to increase knowledge about alcohol and in doing so to change an individual’s attitude and behaviour. Providing information about health risks and brief advice emphasising strategies to reduce consumption are the only interventions that have been recommended for both hazardous and harmful consumption of alcohol. Education may be usefully employed as part of more complex (brief) interventions; however in this section we shall evaluate the ‘stand alone’ application of this form of treatment.

Reports

  • Patton R. (2016) The 3rd National Emergency Department Survey of Alcohol Identification and Intervention Activity. http://alcoholresearchuk.org/alcohol-insights/the-3rd-national-emergency-department-survey-of-alcohol-identification-and-intervention-activity/ : Alcohol Research UK

    Abstract

    The results of the 2015 National Emergency Department survey of alcohol identification and brief advice activity indicate that, in comparison to the previous 2011 survey (Patton and O'Hara, 2013), the number of Emergency Departments informing patients’ GPs about alcohol-related attendance, routinely asking questions about alcohol use (in adults) and having access to Alcohol Health Worker or Clinical Nurse Specialist services have all significantly increased. The provision of training on alcohol screening and brief advice, and the use of a formal alcohol screening tool have also demonstrated modest increases. Nearly half of all departments are now implementing strategies to tackle reattenders. Improved communication with GPs highlights a move towards multidisciplinary care and integration across primary and secondary care services. While routine questioning about alcohol use is fairly high among adults (aged 18-65 years), the limited routine questioning among under 18’s marks room for improvement, particularly since those aged 15-24 years provide the greatest volume of A&E attendances (Currie et al., 2015).

  • Patton R. (2013) Evaluation of a drug & alcohol primary health care team. PeerJ Preprints :
  • Patton R. (2013) Identification and management of physical health problems among an injecting drug using population. PeerJ
  • Patton R. (2012) The 2nd National Emergency Department Survey of Alcohol IBA Activity.
  • Patton R, Drummond C, Deluca P. (2010) Training Programme for Primary Care Staff in the London Borough of Newham on alcohol Identification and Brief Advice.
  • Patton R, Strang J, Birtles C, Crawford M. (2005) The more things change the more they stay the same: Assessing the immediate impact of the licensing act (2004) on attendances to accident & emergency departments..

Internet publications

  • Patton R. (2016) Should alcohol limits for men and women really be the same?. The Conversation

    Abstract

    The UK’s new alcohol guidelines advise that men and women shouldn’t drink more than 14 units of alcohol a week. Previous advice for the British drinker presented a higher threshold for men, so this represents a considerable change. So what was the evidence that the limits should not take gender into account?

  • Steafel E. (2016) New alcohol guidelines: six tips for cutting down on your booze intake. The Telegraph

    Abstract

    Men across the country let out a collective groan this morning as their plans to head to the pub straight after work for a guilt-free drink were scuppered by a government announcement that slashed their recommended drinking limit.

  • Lofthouse K. (2015) HERE’S WHY YOU GET THAT WEIRD ANXIETY WHEN YOU’RE HUNGOVER. Campus Society

    Abstract

    Booze blues, beer fear, hangxiety. The crushing dread that threatens to wipe all the joy out of the world after a heavy session – it goes by many names. At best it’s a taunting reminder that you’re alive when you’d much rather be otherwise, at worst it can be akin to a full-blown panic attack. Hangxiety – a term that’s seen a recent renaissance – happens because your body thinks it’s going into panic mode. Dr Bob (as he likes to be known), lecturer in Clinical Psychology at the University of Surrey and general alcohol Yoda, explained to me how it happens. Because you’re already experiencing anxiety-like symptoms (shakes, nausea, headache, elevated heart rate, sweating) caused by a drop in your brain’s happy-chemicals, alongside dehydration, your body gets all confused and has a hard time differentiating between the hangover and naturally occurring anxiety.

  • Patton R. (2015) Alcohol IBA for adolescents.

    Abstract

    While agreeing that alcohol screening should be undertaken as a matter of routine among adolescents, it is important to note that hazardous and harmful levels of consumption are less common among those under 16 years of age. In England the proportion of young people aged 11-15 years who admit to having ever consumed alcohol fell from 62% to 45% from 1998 - 2011, while the average number of units consumed by those who do drink has almost doubled across the same time period, from 6.4 to 10.4 units per week (1). Our recent review paper on alcohol identification and brief advice (IBA) for adolescents, recommends the use of AUDIT or CRAFT for the identification of those who may benefit from help or advice about their drinking, noting that motivational interventions based in health care or education settings are most effective at reducing consumption and related harms (2). Preliminary data from our survey of alcohol use among 10-17 year olds indicated a steep transition in drinking prevalence occurring at around 14 years; we are currently undertaking two linked trials of face 2 face vs. a Web based intervention for high and low risk drinkers aged 14-17 who present to Emergency Departments (3). The 2012 survey of alcohol IBA in English EDs (4) noted that just 9% of departments routinely ask young people about their alcohol consumption, despite NICE (2007) recommendations that highlighted the need to identify alcohol use and provide appropriate interventions (5). Clearly there needs to be an increase in IBA activity to address the potential harm that even moderate levels of consumption can cause to young people.

  • Patton R. (2015) Doctors need greater understanding of alcohol units and calories.

    Abstract

    The addition of information regarding calorific content to alcohol packaging should afford the consumer greater awareness of the content, facilitate informed choice and hopefully promote appropriate behavioural change. Should the provision of such information become mandated it would be interesting to explore how consumer choice and drinking behaviours may be moderated. Those in clinical practice should, as a matter of routine, ask questions about alcohol use in addition to diet and exercise, and from this the additional calories can be estimated (1 UK unit of alcohol contains 56 kcal), however the nature of the drink itself will add to the overall calorie counts (a 50ml measure of cream liqueur contains just under 1 unit of alcohol, but 121 kcal). Given that almost one in five junior doctors remain unaware of what a unit of alcohol actually is (1;2) there is a clear need to raise address these issues as part of the undergraduate medical school curriculum.

  • Patton R. (2015) Alcohol related deaths in the UK.
  • Patton R, Rose H. (2014) Hard Evidence: are drunk young people driving up A&E visits?. The Conversation
  • Patton R. (2014) Current / ex-smokers and use of e-cigarettes.

    Abstract

    While I am broadly in agreement with the authors that young people should not be exposed to e-cigarette advertising (1), we should not forget that these nicotine delivery systems may be of benefit in mitigating the harm of combustible tobacco products, or their potential effectiveness at helping smokers transition to non-smoker (2). It is unclear what proportion of current smokers or ex-smokers in this sample were now users of e-cigarettes, as these groups group appear excluded from the survey. The data reported is based on a population of non-smokers, with 0.3% overall admitting to current use of e-cigarettes, and 2.6% 'other' combustible tobacco products. proportion of young people doing both is not clear, but this could have a significant impact on the reported intention to smoke cigarettes. It would be interesting to explore the data for those young people who were tobacco naive.

  • Magazine . (2011) Who, What, Why: Why are Indians dying from alcohol poisoning?. BBC

    Abstract

    More than 100 people have died after drinking toxic alcohol in the Indian state of West Bengal, in the latest example of fatal poisoning in the country. So why does it happen?

  • Patton R. (2010) Binge Drinking.
  • Patton R. (2009) Dr Bob Patton CSci.
  • Patton R. (2009) Alcohol problems in A&E.
  • Patton R, McCormick R. (2005) Alcohol Screening and Brief Interventions. BMJ Learning

    Abstract

    An interactive online learning module

Posters

  • Deluca P, Drummond C, Boniface S, Patton R. (2016) Optimal screening tool for under age drinking: Findings from the SIPS Jr Programme.

    Abstract

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/acer.13084/epdf

  • Patton R. (2016) Alcohol & e-Health: New technologies for an old problem. 2nd UCL Festival for Digital Health

    Abstract

    The SIPS Jr. Research programme1 is funded by the NIHR to screen for alcohol use and deliver effective brief interventions to 14-17yr olds presenting to Emergency departments. Ongoing Patient & Public Involvement work has identified a need for paperless screening / baseline data collection and an enthusiasm for interventions based on mobile technologies. Two recent systematic reviews support the use of this technology to identify and intervene with adolescent drinkers2,3. Working with a specialist software development company (CodeFace Ltd.) we have developed a bespoke data collection / participant management tool for the iPad which is currently being used as part of an ongoing RCT4, with data being collected from 10 Emergency Departments across England (London, Hull and the North East). This paperless method of study management has already demonstrated considerable cost savings and is popular with patients and research staff (over 6500 participants recruited to date in the current trial and an earlier prevalence study). Both the Management Tool and e-intervention have been developed and refined by the research team working collaboratively with the Web Developer, PPI groups and local youth organisations.

  • Patton R. (2015) Alcohol, Adolescents & the Emergency Department. ESRC symposium on e-Health and Youth Mental Well Being

Theses and dissertations

  • Patton R. (2010) Alcohol and the Emergency Department. Screening and interventions to reduce harm..

Teaching

PsychD Research Methods & U/g Clinical Psychology Module

Departmental Duties

Member Athena SWAN working group. Member Faculty Ethics Committee. Member School Impact & Marketing committee.

Journal Editorial & Reviewer activity

Editorial Board member PeerJ. April 2013 – Present.

Editorial Board member BMC Emergency Medicine January 2011 - Present

Editorial Board member BioMed Research International April 2013 – April 2015

Editorial Board member BMC Research Notes January 2005 - April 2015

 

 

I currently review papers for Substance Abuse Journal (recognised as an Outstanding Reviewer in 2014), Journal of Child Health, British Medical Journal, Emergency Medical Journal, Drug & Alcohol Dependence, Drug & Alcohol Review and Alcohol & Alcoholism. I am also involved in the review panel for NIHR, RfPB and SDO grant applications.

Public Engagement

Why is it more difficult to come when you've been drinking? The Debrief February 2016

New alcohol guidelines - Six tips for cutting down. Telegraph, January 2016

Here's why you get that weird anxiety when hungover. Campus Society, November 2015

Meet the women haunted by 'hangxiety', Daily Mail, July 2015

Why do I get drunk guilt, and how to prevent it. The Debrief, October 2014

Why do I get anxious when I drink? The Debrief, April 2015

Are drunk young people driving up A&E visits?, The Conversation,  November 2014

Alcohol Nation, Science Museum, October 2012

Who, What, Why: Why are Indians dying from alcohol poisoning? BBC News, December 2011

Twenty-something & teetotal, News of the World, June 2011

Binge Drinking, BBC Health, January 2010

Hospitals 'do not probe drinking', BBC News, July 2007

Hospitals 'fail to tackle drinking problems', Daily Mail, July 2007

Drug may help alcoholics cut down, BBC News, March 2007

Chemical may stop alcohol craving, BBC News, December 2006

Drink laws 'not changing habits', BBC News, November 2006

The mid-life bingers, Daily Mail, October 2006

Impact of the licensing act, BBC Radio, June 2006

Does alcohol make people violent? The Guardian, July 2005

Smokers' patch that may also help beat the bottle, The Guardian, April 2004

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