Professor Gavin Hilson

Research Interests

For over a decade, Gavin has carried out research on mining and development in Ghana, Mali, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Malawi and Guyana.  His work has been funded by a range of organizations, including the ESRC, British Council, British Academy, the Royal Society and Nuffield Foundation.  He is presently carrying out research on mineral certification schemes; Corporate Social Responsibility in the mining sector, specifically the application of a ‘social license to operate’ in sub-Saharan Africa and relations between multinationals and artisanal operators; and linkages between smallholder farming, agricultural liberalization and the growth of small-scale mining.

Blog: 'Field Notes and Anecdotes' http://asmfielddiary.blogspot.co.uk/ 

Research Collaborations

  • University of Mines and Technology, Ghana
  • University of Ghana, Ghana
  • University of Bath, UK
  • University of East Anglia, UK
  • Murdoch University, Australia
  • University of Queensland, Australia
  • WWF Guianas

Teaching

  • Programme Director, MSc Extractive Industries, The Environment and Sustainability.

Editor-in-Chief, The Extractive Industries and Society

The Extractive Industries and Society is the one journal devoted to disseminating in-depth analysis of the socio-economic and environmental impacts of mining and oil and gas production on societies, both past and present. It provides a platform for the exchange of ideas on a wide range of issues and debates on the extractive industries and development, bringing together research undertaken by an interdisciplinary group of social scientists in academia, government, the NGO community and industry. Topics covered by the journal include environmental management at mines and rigs; Corporate Social Responsibility and community development; the environmental and social impacts of artisanal and small-scale mining in developing countries; corruption and the extractive industries; industry reform; the donor community and the extractive industries; climate change and fossil fuel extraction; and taxation and foreign direct investment in the sector. Submissions which draw upon experiences from both developed and developing countries are invited from across the social sciences. The journal publishes original research articles, field reports, critical reviews, conference reports, book reviews and short correspondences.  For more information, including 'Instructions for Authors', please visit the journal website at www.journals.elsevier.com/the-extractive-industries-and-society/.

PhD Students

(2015-Present) Ph.D. Co-Supervisor for Mr. Joshua Sandin, School of Management. Royal Holloway, University of London.  Thesis title: "Microfinance and Small-Scale Mining in Sub-Saharan Africa", SEDTC ESRC doctoral fellowship, Royal Holloway, 3 years.

(2013-Present) Ph.D. Supervisor for Mr. James McQuilken, Surrey Business School, The University of Surrey.  Thesis title: “‘Ethical Gold’ in sub-Saharan Africa: A Viable Poverty Alleviation Strategy?” SEDTC ESRC doctoral fellowship, University of Surrey, 3 years.   

(2013-Present) Ph.D. Supervisor for Angélique Ikuzwe, Surrey Business School, The University of Surrey.  Thesis title: “‘Young Faces in Dangerous Places: Diagnosing the Child Labour ‘Problem’ in Northern Ghana”, Business and Management Postgraduate Research Studentship, University of Surrey, 3 years.   

(2011-Present) Ph.D. Supervisor for Mr. Makzum Abudher, Surrey Business School, The University of Surrey.  Thesis title: “After The Oil and the Battle? Economic Diversification in Libya”, Libyan Government Scholarship, 3 years.

(2010-Present) Ph.D. Supervisor for Ms. Rachel Perks, School of Agriculture, Policy and Development, The University of Reading.  Thesis title: “Here for a Lifetime: Perspectives from Rwanda’s Generational Miners”.  Funding: University of Reading Studentship, 3 years.

(2010-Present) Ph.D. Supervisor for Mrs. Hope Kruku, School of Agriculture, Policy and Development, The University of Reading.  Thesis title: “Can Solid Mineral Development Offset Nigeria’s Oil Curse?” self-funded. Submitted

(2010-2014) Ph.D. Supervisor for Mr. Mark Hirons, School of Agriculture, Policy and Development, The University of Reading.  Thesis title: “Addressing Livelihood and Environmental Needs: What are the Implications of Implementing the REDD Mechanism in The Mineralized Territories of Ghana?” Funding: NERC/ESRC Studentship, 3 years. Completed

(2010-2014) Ph.D. Supervisor for Dr. Audrey Cash, School of Agriculture, Policy and Development, The University of Reading.  Thesis title: “Oil for Development in Africa: The Case of Chad”.  Completed

(2009-2013) Ph.D. Supervisor for Dr. Paul Kamlongera, School of Agriculture, Policy and Development, The University of Reading.  Thesis title: “De-agrarianization and livelihood diversification in sub-Saharan Africa: What economic role does artisanal mining play in rural Malawi?” Funding: Commonwealth Fellowship Program, 3 years. Completed

(2009-2013) Ph.D. Supervisor for Dr. Godfried Appiah Okoh, School of Agriculture, Policy and Development, The University of Reading.  Thesis title: “Using the grievance mechanism to contextualize small-scale and large-scale mining conflicts in rural Ghana”, self-funded.  Completed

(2008-2011) Ph.D. Supervisor for Dr. Martin Clifford, School of Agriculture, Policy and Development, The University of Reading.  Thesis title: “Environment, health and mercury pollution in the small-scale gold mining industry: strategies and ways forward in Ghana and Guyana” Funding: NERC/ESRC, 3 years. Completed

(2007-2011) Ph.D. Supervisor for Dr. Emmanuel Conteh, School of Agriculture, Policy and Development, The University of Reading.  Thesis title: “Livelihoods Diversification Challenges in the Diamond Mining District of Kono, Sierra Leone”, Self-funded. Completed

(2007-2011) Ph.D. Supervisor for Dr. John Childs, Institute for Development Policy and Management, The University of Manchester.  Thesis title: “Fair Trade Gold: A Panacea for Poverty in Tanzania?” Funding: ESRC Studentship, 3 years. Completed

(2006-2010) Ph.D. Supervisor for Dr. Sadia Mohammed Banchirigah, Institute for Development Policy and Management, The University of Manchester.  Thesis title: “Alternative Livelihood Projects: A Vehicle for Poverty Alleviation in Rural Ghana?” Funding: University of Manchester Alumni Fund.  Completed

Contact Me

E-mail:
Phone: 01483 68 6326

Find me on campus
Room: 07 SE 00

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Publications

Journal articles

  • Hilson G, Hilson A, Maconachie R. (2017) 'Opportunity or necessity? Conceptualizing entrepreneurship at African small-scale mines'. Elsevier Technological Forecasting and Social Change,

    Abstract

    This article critically examines the policy environment in place for artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) – low-tech, labour-intensive mineral extraction and processing – in sub-Saharan Africa, with a view to determining whether there is adequate ‘space’ for the sector's operators to flourish as entrepreneurs. In recent years, there has been growing attention paid to ASM in the region, particularly as a vehicle for stimulating local economic development. The work being planned under the Africa Mining Vision (AMV), a comprehensive policy agenda adopted by African heads of state in February 2009, could have an enormous impact on this front. One of its core objectives is to pressure host governments into Boosting Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining by following a series of streamlined recommendations. It is concluded, however, that there is a disconnect between how entrepreneurship in ASM has been interpreted and projected by proponents of the AMV on the one hand, and the form it has mostly taken in practice on the other hand. This gulf must be rapidly bridged if ASM is to have a transformative impact, economically, in the region.

  • Hilson G. (2017) 'Shootings and Burning Excavators: Some Rapid Reflections on the Government of Ghana’s Handling of the Informal Galamsey Mining ‘Menace’'. Elsevier Resources Policy, 54, pp. 109-116.

    Abstract

    This paper reflects critically on recent actions taken by the Government of Ghana to eliminate unlicensed artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) – popularly referred to as ‘galamsey’ – in the country. At a time when donors and other governments in sub-Saharan Africa are working diligently to identify ways to formalize ASM and to integrate the sector into broader economic and rural development frameworks, the Government of Ghana has turned to its military and police to combat illegal activity, at times describing its efforts as a ‘fight’ and the phenomenon itself as ‘a menace’. The decision of the government has come as a surprise, given that ASM accounts for more than 30 percent of the country's gold production, and employs close to one million people directly nationwide and generates millions of more jobs in the upstream and downstream industries it spawns.

  • Hilson GM. (2017) 'Why is there a Large-Scale Mining ‘Bias’ in Sub-Saharan Africa?'. Elsevier Land Use Policy,
    [ Status: Accepted ]

    Abstract

    This paper reflects critically on the state of mining sector-led development in sub-Saharan Africa. It argues that in most countries in the region, policies are ‘biased’ in favour of large-scale extraction. World Bank officials have long maintained that, in sub-Saharan Africa, the large-scale mines financed and operated by foreign multinationals could become ‘growth poles’ which stimulate marked economic development. For this to happen, however, radically different policy approaches will be needed – changes which, up until now, the region’s governments have shown little interest in making.

  • Hilson GM, Hilson A, Maconachie R, Mcquilken JT, Goumandakoye H. (2017) 'Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining (ASM) in Sub-Saharan Africa: Re-conceptualizing Formalization and ‘Illegal’ Activity'. Elsevier Geoforum, 83, pp. 80-90.

    Abstract

    This article contributes to the debate on the formalization of artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) – low-tech, labour-intensive mineral extraction and processing – in developing countries. A unique sector populated by an eclectic group of individuals, ASM has expanded rapidly in all corners of the world in recent years. Most of its activities, however, are informal, scattered across lands which are not officially titled. But growing recognition of the sector's economic importance, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, has forced donors, and to some extent, policymakers, to ‘rethink’ development strategies for ASM. As part of broader moves to improve the regulation of, and occasionally intensify the delivery of assistance to, the sector, many are now searching frantically for fresh ideas on how to bring operations into the legal domain, where, it is believed, they can be regulated, monitored and supported more effectively. A challenging exercise, this entails first determining, with some degree of precision, why people choose to operate informally in this sector. Drawing on analysis from the literature and findings from research conducted in Ghana and Niger, it is argued that the legalist school (on informality) in part explains how governments across sub-Saharan Africa are ‘creating’ bureaucracies which are stifling the formalization of ASM activities in the region. A more nuanced development strategy grounded in local realities is needed if formalization is to have a transformative effect on the livelihoods of those engaged in ASM in the region and elsewhere in the developing world.

  • Hilson G, Maconachie R. (2017) 'Formalizing Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining: Insights, Contestations and Clarifications'. Wiley Area, 49 (4), pp. 443-451.

    Abstract

    In recent years, a number of academic analyses have emerged which reflect critically on why most artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) activities–low tech, labour-intensive, mineral extraction and processing– occur in informal ‘spaces’. This body of scholarship, however, is heavily disconnected from work being carried out by policymakers and donors who, recognizing the growing economic importance of ASM in numerous rural sections of the developing world, are now working to identify ways in which to facilitate the formalization of its activities. It has rather drawn mostly on theories of informality that have been developed around radically different, and in many cases, incomparable, experiences, as well as largely redundant ideas, to contextualize phenomena in the sector. This paper reflects critically on the implications of this widening gulf, with the aim of facilitating a better alignment of scholarly debates on ASM’s informality with overarching policy/donor objectives. The divide must be reconciled if the case for formalizing ASM is to be strengthened, and policy is to be reformulated to reflect more accurately the many dimensions of the sector’s operations.

  • Hilson GM, Laing T. (2017) 'Gold Mining, Indigenous Land Claims and Conflict in Guyana’s Hinterland'. Elsevier Journal of Rural Studies, 50, pp. 172-187.

    Abstract

    In recent decades, Guyana’s gold-rich interior has been the location of numerous, mostly low-latent, conflicts. In each case, groups of Afro and Indo-Guyanese originating from the country’s coastal cities and towns – popularly referred to as ‘Coast Landers’ – have clashed with indigenous Amerindians over control of remote parcels of land containing gold deposits. Each appears to have a valid argument in support of its position: the former contend that they are legally entitled to work these lands, having obtained the requisite permits from the central government to mine for gold, whilst the latter maintain that such decisions constitute a breach of their human rights, and draw attention to key legislation in support of their case. This article broadens understanding of the dynamics of these conflicts by reflecting more critically on the arguments presented by both parties. Drawing heavily on research conducted in Mahdia-Campbelltown, one location where frictions between Coast Lander mining groups and Amerindians are particularly serious, it is argued that these disputes are not about control of gold riches as is popularly believed but rather a product of deeply-rooted ethnic tensions between these parties.

  • Hilson GM. (2017) '‘Mapping’ Small-Scale Mineral Production Networks: The Case of Alluvial Diamonds in Ghana'. Wiley Development and Change,
    [ Status: Accepted ]

    Abstract

    In recent years, donors and certain governments have committed to formalizing and supporting artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM)–lowtech, labour-intensive mineral extraction and processing. Few, however, are able to do so effectively because of a limited knowledge of how the sector operates, who it employs and where the commodities it mines are being channelled. This article argues that a radical re-conceptualization of ASM will be needed if these challenges are to be overcome. As a starting point, it calls on donors and policymakers to adopt the Global Production Network (GPN) as a ‘lens’ for analyzing the sector’s organizational structures. Popular in geography scholarship, the GPN, though rarely used to study the intricacies of largely-informal sectors such as ASM, could prove valuable here, aiding with the mapping of key production processes. The GPN was applied to Ghana’s artisanal diamond mining sector, research which yielded valuable insight about its organization, the roles played by the different individuals who populate it, and the nature of the relationships between these individuals. This information is a key to designing more robust formalization and support strategies for ASM in the country, and the exercise, overall, provides important lessons for other governments working to achieve similar goals.

  • Hilson GM, Laing T. (2016) 'Guyana Gold: A Unique Resource Curse?'. Taylor and Francis Journal of Development Studies,
    [ Status: Accepted ]

    Abstract

    This article offers explanations for the underwhelming economic performance of Guyana, a country heavily dependent on the revenue generated from gold mining. Here, government intervention has spawned a gold mining sector which today is comprised exclusively of local small and medium-scale operators. But whilst this rather unique model appears to be the ideal blueprint for facilitating local development, the country seems to be experiencing many of the same setbacks that have beset scores of other resource-rich developing world economies. Unless these problems are anticipated, properly diagnosed and appropriately tackled, a resource curse-type outcome is inevitable, irrespective of the context.

  • Hilson GM, Hilson A, Mcquilken JT. (2016) 'Ethical minerals: Fairer trade for whom?'. Elsevier Resources Policy, 49, pp. 232-247.

    Abstract

    This paper offers preliminary reflections on the direction and impact of the emerging ‘ethical minerals’ agenda, focusing specifically on the case of sub-Saharan Africa. Over the past two decades, the mining industry in this region has experienced profound change, reshaped by large injections of foreign investment. During this period, host governments have redrafted fiscal policies in an attempt to attract multinational mining and exploration companies. These moves, however, have stifled the regularization of artisanal and small-scale mine operators, hundreds of thousands of whom have struggled to secure their own permits due to a lack of available land, the exorbitant costs of legalizing their activities, and excessively-bureaucratic registration processes. Ethical mineral schemes and standards, which seek to connect producers to consumers, have been championed as potential mechanisms for alleviating the hardships of these operators. But further analysis reveals that there is considerable discrepancy between the implied and at times, stated, aims and impacts of the interventions being piloted/implemented in the region on the one hand, and what is actually happening in practice on the other hand. The analysis serves as a stark reminder that the ethical mineral schemes and standards being piloted/implemented are not development interventions, as is often believed.

  • Hilson GM. (2016) 'Farming, small-scale mining and rural livelihoods in Sub-Saharan Africa: A critical overview'. Elsevier Extractive Industries and Society, 3 (2), pp. 547-563.
  • Maconachie R, Hilson G. (2016) 'Re-Thinking the Child Labor "Problem" in Rural sub-Saharan Africa: The Case of Sierra Leone's Half Shovels'. PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD WORLD DEVELOPMENT, 78, pp. 136-147.
  • Hirons M, Hilson G, Asase A, Hodson ME. (2014) 'Mining in a changing climate: what scope for forestry-based legacies?'. ELSEVIER SCI LTD JOURNAL OF CLEANER PRODUCTION, 84, pp. 430-438.
  • Hilson GM, Hilson AE, Adu-Darko E. (2014) 'Chinese Participation in Ghana's Informal Gold Mining Economy: Drivers, Implications and Clarifications'. Journal of Rural Studies,
    [ Status: Accepted ]
  • Hilson G, Gatsinzi A. (2014) 'A rocky road ahead? Critical reflections on the futures of small-scale mining in sub-Saharan Africa'. ELSEVIER SCI LTD FUTURES, 62, pp. 1-9.
  • Hilson G, Osei L. (2014) 'Tackling youth unemployment in sub-Saharan Africa: Is there a role for artisanal and small-scale mining?'. ELSEVIER SCI LTD FUTURES, 62, pp. 83-94.
  • Hilson G. (2014) 'The extractive industries and development in sub-Saharan Africa: An introduction'. ELSEVIER SCI LTD RESOURCES POLICY, 40, pp. 1-3.
  • Hilson G. (2014) ''Constructing' Ethical Mineral Supply Chains in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Case of Malawian Fair Trade Rubies'. WILEY-BLACKWELL DEVELOPMENT AND CHANGE, 45 (1), pp. 53-78.
  • Hilson GM, McQuilken JT. (2014) 'Four decades of support for artisanal and small-scale mining in sub-Saharan Africa: A critical review'. Elsevier The Extractive Industries and Society, United Kingdom: 1 (1), pp. 104-118.
  • Maconachie R, Hilson G. (2013) 'Editorial introduction: the extractive industries, community development and livelihood change in developing countries'. OXFORD UNIV PRESS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT JOURNAL, 48 (3), pp. 347-359.
  • Hilson G, Amankwah R, Ofori-Sarpong G. (2013) 'Going for gold: transitional livelihoods in Northern Ghana'. CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS JOURNAL OF MODERN AFRICAN STUDIES, 51 (1), pp. 109-137.
  • Hilson GM, Garforth CJ. (2013) ''Everyone Now is Concentrating on the Mining': Drivers and Implications of Rural Economic Transition in the Eastern Region of Ghana'. Taylor & Francis The Journal of Development Studies, 49 (3), pp. 348-364.
  • Hilson GM, Garforth CJ. (2012) ''Agricultural Poverty’ and the Expansion of Artisanal Mining in Sub-Saharan Africa: Experiences from Southwest Mali and Southeast Ghana'. Springer Verlag Population Research and Policy Review, 31 (3), pp. 435-464.
  • Hilson GM. (2012) 'Poverty Traps in Small-Scale Mining Communities: The Case of Sub-Saharan Africa'. Taylor and Francis Canadian Journal of Development Studies, 33 (2), pp. 180-197.
  • Hilson GM. (2012) 'Corporate Social Responsibility in the Extractive Industries: Experiences from Developing Countries'. Resources Policy, 37 (2), pp. 131-137.
  • Hilson GM. (2012) 'Corporate Social Responsibility in the Extrative Industries: Experiences from Developing Countries'. Elsevier Resources Policy, 37 (1), pp. 131-260.
  • Hilson GM, van Bockstael S. (2012) 'Poverty and Livelihood Diversification in Rural Liberia: Exploring the Linkages Between Artisanal Diamond Mining and Smallholder Rice Production'. Taylor and Francis The Journal of Development Studies, 48 (3), pp. 416-431.
  • Hilson GM. (2012) 'Family Hardship and Cultural Values: Child Labor in Malian Small-Scale Gold Mining Communities'. Elsevier World Development, 40 (8), pp. 1663-1674.
  • Hilson GM, Maconachie R. (2011) 'Artisanal Gold Mining: A New Frontier in Post-Conflict Sierra Leone?'. Taylor & Francis (Routledge) Journal of Development Studies, 47 (4), pp. 595-616.
  • Hilson GM. (2011) 'Artisanal Mining, Smallholder Farming and Livelihood Diversification in Rural Sub-Saharan Africa'. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd The Journal of International Development, 23 (8), pp. 1031-1150.
  • Hilson GM. (2011) 'Artisanal Mining, Smallholder Farming and Livlihood Diversification in Rural Sub-Saharan Africa: An Introduction'. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd Journal of International Development, 23 (8), pp. 1031-1041.
  • Hilson GM, Okoh G. (2011) 'Poverty and Livelihood Diversification: Exploring the Linkages Between Smallholder Farming and Artisanal Mining in Rural Ghana'. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd Journal of International Development, 23 (8), pp. 1100-1014.
  • Hilson GM, Kamlongera P. (2011) 'Poverty Alleviation in rural Malawi: Is There a Role for Artisanal Mining?'. Taylor & Francis Journal of Eastern African Studies, 5 (1), pp. 42-69.
  • Hilson GM. (2011) ''Inherited Commitments': Do Changes in Ownership Affect Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) at African Gold Mines?'. African Journal of Business Management, 5 (27), pp. 10921-10939.
  • Hilson GM, Ackah-Baidoo A. (2011) 'Can Microcredit Services Alleviate Hardship in African Small-Scale Mining Communities'. Elsevier World Development, 39 (7), pp. 1191-1203.
  • Hilson GM, Maconachie R. (2011) 'Safeguarding Livelihoods or Exacerbating Poverty?: Artisanal Mining and Formalization in West Africa'. John Wiley and Sons Natural Resources Forum, 35 (4), pp. 293-303.
  • Hilson GM, Van Bockstael G. (2011) 'Diamond Mining, Rice Farming and a "Maggi Cube": A Viable Poverty Alleviation Strategy in Rural Liberia'. John Wiley & Sons, Ltd Journal of International Development, 23 (8), pp. 1042-1053.
  • Hilson GM. (2010) 'Livelihood diversification and the expansion of artisanal mining in rural Tanzania: Drivers and policy implications'. IP Publishing Outlook on Agriculture, 39 (2), pp. 141-147.
  • Hilson GM. (2010) ''A Kimberley Protest': Diamond Mining, Export Sanctions and Poverty in Akwatia, Ghana'. Oxford Journals African Affairs, 109 (436), pp. 431-450.
  • Hilson GM. (2010) ''Once a Miner, Always a Miner': Poverty and Livelihood Diversification in Akwatia, Ghana'. Elsevier Journal of Rural Studies, 26 (3), pp. 296-307.
  • Hilson GM, Clifford MJ. (2010) 'Small-Scale Gold Mining, the Environment and Human Health: An Introduction to the Ghana Case'. Inderscience Publishers International Journal of Environment and Pollution, 41 (3-4), pp. 185-194.
  • Hilson GM, Banchirigah SM. (2010) 'De-Agrarianization, Re-Agrarianization and Local Economic Development: Re-Orienting Livelihoods in African Artisanal Mining Communities'. SpringerLink Policy Sciences: an international journal devoted to the improvement of policy making, 43 (2), pp. 157-180.
  • Hilson GM. (2010) 'Challenges with Eradicating Child Labour in the Artisanal Mining Sector: Experiences from Northern Ghana'. Wiley Journal of Community Practice: organizing, planning, development and change, 41 (3), pp. 445-473.
  • Hilson GM, Clifford MJ. (2010) 'Small-Scale Mining, Mercury and Environmental Health: Challenges and Ways Forward in Rural Ghana'. The International Journal of Environment and Pollution, 41 (3-4), pp. 185-325.
  • Hilson GM, Carstens J. (2009) 'Mining, Grievance and Conflict in Rural Tanzania'. Liverpool University Press International Development Planning Review, 31 (3), pp. 301-326.
  • Hilson GM. (2009) 'Small-Scale Mining, Poverty and Economic Development in Sub-Saharan Africa: An Overview'. Elsevier Resources Policy, 34 (1-2), pp. 1-5.
  • Hilson GM, Banchirigah SM. (2009) 'Are Alternate Livelihood Projects Alleviating Poverty in Mining Communities? Experiences from Ghana'. Taylor & Francis (Routledge) Journal of Development Studies, 45 (2), pp. 172-196.
  • Hilson GM. (2009) 'Small-Scale Mining, Poverty and Development in Sub-Saharan Africa'. Resources Policy, 34 (1-2), pp. 1-86.
  • Hilson GM, Maconachie E. (2009) 'Good Governance and the Extractive Industries in Sub-Saharan Africa'. Taylor and Francis Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy Review, 30 (1), pp. 52-100.
  • Hilson GM. (2008) ''A Load Too Heavy': A Critical Examination of the Child Labor Problem in African Artisanal Mining Communities'. Elsevier Children and Youth Services Review, 30, pp. 1233-1245.
  • Hilson GM. (2008) ''Fair Trade Gold': Antecedents, Prospects and Challenges'. Elsevier Geoforum, 39 (1), pp. 386-400.
  • Hilson GM. (2006) 'Improving Environment, Ethical and Economic Performance in the Mining Industry: Part 2: Life Cycle and Process Analysis, Innovation and Technical Change'. Journal of Cleaner Production, 14 (12-13), pp. 1039-1188.
  • Hilson GM. (2006) 'Improving Environment, Ethical and Economic Performance in the Mining Industry: Part 1: Environmental Management and Sustainable Development'. Journal of Cleaner Production, 14 (3-4), pp. 225-462.
  • Hilson GM. (2003) 'Environmental Management in the Small-Scale Mining Industry'. Journal of Cleaner Production, 11 (2)

Conference papers

  • Hilson GM. (2012) 'REDD+ and Mining in Guyana and Ghana'. Bergen Resource Centre for International Development, Bergen: Facing the Realities of Corruption and REDD+
  • Hilson GM. (2012) 'REDD+ and Mining in Guyana: A Critical Review'. Accra: Climate Change & Population Conference on Africa Regional Insitute for Population Studies (RIPS)
  • Hilson GM. (2012) 'The Role of Public Policy in Improving and Promoting ASM'. Accra: Africa Wide Cross Networks/Constituencies Meeting on the African Mining Vision
  • Hilson GM. (2012) 'Enhancing the Developmental Potential of Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining'. Washington DC: Enhancing the Development Potential of Artisanal and Small Scale Mining
  • Hilson GM. (2012) 'Fair Trade Gold: Calibrating an Unrealistic Standard?'. Munich Centre on Governance, Munich: Governing Sustainability: Global Standards and Certification Schemes in the Natural Resources Sector
  • Hilson GM. (2012) 'The Extractive Industries and Livlihood Changes in Developing Countries'. New York City: Association of Americaqn Geographers Annual Meeting
  • Hilson GM. (2011) 'The Challenges of Small-Scale Mining: An Overview of Current Policy Responses'. Egmont Palace, Brussels: Artisanal Diamond Mining and Rural Change in West and Central Africa
  • Hilson GM. (2011) 'Diamonds for Development in Ghana'. Charles Léopold Mayer Foundation for the Progress of Mankind, Paris: Beyond the Resource Curse, New Dynamics in the Management of Natural Resources: New Actors and Concepts
  • Hilson GM. (2011) 'Child Labour Artisanal Mining in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Critical Overview'. New York City: United Nations 19th Annual Conference on Sustainable Production and Consumption
  • Hilson GM. (2011) 'Working for the Family: An Overview of Child Labour Dynamics in West African Artisanal Gold Planning Communities'. The University of Birmingham: Centre for West African Studies Seminar Series
  • Hilson GM. (2010) 'Inherited Commitments: How Do Mergers and Acquisitions Affect Corporate Social Responsibility at African Gold Mines'. The University of London: CSR and Stakeholder Engagement in the Extractive Sector
  • Hilson GM. (2010) 'Poverty Traps in Small Scale Mining Communities: Case Studies from West Africa'. Oxford University: Africa Studies Association of the UK Biennial Conference 2010
  • Hilson GM. (2010) ''Agricultural Poverty' and the Expansion of Artisanal Mining: Case Studies from West Africa'. University of Mines and Technology, Tarkwa, Ghana: 1st Annual Mining and Mineral Conference
  • Hilson GM. (2010) 'Africa's 'Dual Gold Mining Economy': Antecedents, Issues and Implications'. Skellefteå, Sweden: Euro Mine Expo 2010
  • Hilson GM. (2010) 'Artisanal Mining in Sub-Saharan Africa: Priorities and Needs'. New York City: United Nations 18th Annual Conference on Sustainable Production and Consumption
  • Hilson GM. (2010) 'Poverty, De-agrarianization and the Ris eof Small-Scale Mining in Rural Sub-Saharan Africa'. Department of Geography, the University of Toronto at Mississauga: Csillag Seminar Series in Geography
  • Hilson GM. (2009) 'Challenges with Eradicating Child Labour in African Small-Scale Mining Communities: A Case Study of the Talensi-Nabdam, Upper East Region of Ghana'. York University, Toronto, Canada: Rethinking Extractive Industry Regulation, Dispossession and Emerging Claims
  • Hilson GM. (2009) 'Eradicating Child Labour in Artisanal Mining Communities: The Case of Sub-Saharan Africa'. University of Cambridge: Mining Across Generations, CRASSH
  • Hilson GM. (2008) 'Livlihoods in Transition: De-agrarianization and the Rise of Artisanal Mining in Sub-Saharan Africa'. University College London: Department of Anthropology Seminar Series
  • Hilson GM. (2008) 'Structural Adjustment, Rural Livlihood Diversification and the Rise of Illegal Artisanal Mining in Sub-Sharan Africa'. Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada, Toronto: The West African Mining Seminar
  • Hilson GM. (2008) 'Re-Agrarianizing Rural Ghana: Can Farming-Based Alternative Livlihoods Offset Illegal Gold Mining Activity'. Accra, Ghana: Beyond Foreign Direct Investment in Africa's Mining Sector
  • Hilson GM. (2008) 'Mining and Rural Development: The Trajectory of Diamond Production in Ghana'. Didimala Game Lodge, South Africa: Validation Workshop for he Egmont Artisanal Diamond Mining Project, Sponsored by Egmont (The Royal Institute for International Studies)
  • Hilson GM. (2008) 'Mercury Management at Ghanaian Small-Scale Gold Mines: What Lessons for the Guianas?'. WWF Guianas Programs Office, WWF Guianas, Georgetown, Guyana: Improving the Management of the Goldmining Sector
  • Hilson GM. (2008) 'Can the National Youth Employment Program Alleviate the Illegal Mining Problem in Ghana?'. VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdam: Anthropology of Small Scale Gold Mining and Development: Cultural, Social, and Economic Readings of the Opportunities of a Natural Resource
  • Hilson GM. (2008) 'How 'Lootable' is Alluvial Gold?'. Department of Anthropology, University of Durham and British Academy, Durham: Examining the Long-Term Impact of Post-Colonial Phases of Extractive Industry on Indigenous Livelihoods
  • Hilson GM. (2008) 'Is Alluvial Gold A 'Lootable' Resource'. School of Agriculture, Policy and Development, University of Reading, Reading: Tuesday Seminar programme 2007-2008

Books

  • Hilson GM. (2006) Small-scale mining, rural subsistence and poverty in West Africa. Practical Action
  • Hilson GM. (2003) The Socio-Economic Impacts of Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining in Developing Countries. Taylor & Francis

Book chapters

  • Hilson GM, McQuilken J. (2016) 'Moving overseas? Critical reflections on the implementation of Latin American ethical gold schemes in Sub-Saharan Africa'. in Deonandan K (ed.) Mining in Latin America: Critical Approaches to the New Extraction Routledge Article number 10 , pp. 184-210.
  • Hilson GM. (2012) 'Fair Trade Gold:Prospects for Africa's Artisanal Miners'. in Reed AM, Reed D, Utting P (eds.) Business Regulation and Non-State Actors Routledge Article number 20
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Assembly date: Tue Feb 20 00:24:59 GMT 2018
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