Professor Matthew Leach

Research Interests

Matthew's research focuses on decentralised energy supply systems and the role of demand-side management, exploring the environmental and economic performance of emerging technologies, and the roles for policy, in long term transitions to a low carbon economy.

Current research grants

Transitions was refunded as the "Realising Transition Pathways" consortium, in which Matthew leads work on the demand side. He is an Investigator in the Leverhulme funded localPURE project, collaborating with Oxford University to develop methods for design of local energy and material production systems using renewable resources. He is an investigator in the EPSRC Local Nexus Network, exploring the nexus of food, energy and water for localised food manufacturing. He is an Investigator in the £2m DfID/EPSRC funded consortium AgriCEN, exploring the role of agro-industries to help increase access to clean energy in Africa.

Past projects

Matthew was Principle Investigator for an EPSRC Platform Grant (2001- 2005 and refunded for 2005 - 2010) involving Imperial College and University of Surrey to develop a Decentralised Generation research programme with significant industrial involvement. He was an Investigator in the Sustainable Urban Wastes Consortium of EPSRC's first Sustainable Urban Environments (SUE1) programme and was an Investigator for the ReVISIONS consortium and for the Ashford Integrated Alternatives (AIA) consortium, both within SUE2. In these projects he looked at linkage between energy, waste, water systems and the built environment, at the urban scale. He was an investigator in the EPSRC SUPERGEN Flexnet Consortium and in the EPSRC/EoN Transitions consortium, in which he focused on opportunities for demand side participation, including decentralised generation and energy efficiency and load control. He was an Investigator in the EPSRC funded REDUCE project within the 'Transforming Energy Demand through Digital Innovation' programme, utilising applications of communications technology to enhance energy efficiency and demand management in buildings.

Commercial and policy research

Matthew has led research and consultancy contracts for government and industry, recently including developing for DfID a financial model of a novel solar-electric cooking appliance for Africa; work for the electrical appliances industry on detailed monitoring of power consumption and energy-using practices in the home; a Knowledge Transfer Partnership project, developing a computer-based system for optimising energy efficiency investments for commercial buildings, with the consultancy Carbon Credentials; a study of heat supply options for the UK, for the Combined Heat and Power Association, working with Imperial College London. Matthew made inputs to the 2003 UK Energy White Paper on scenarios for energy technology choices; he led a DTI study on the potential for renewable energy fuels in aviation; he worked on an EU study looking at scenarios for the long term development of electricity systems across Europe and contributed to two reports on low carbon technologies commissioned by the Prime Minister's Office as an input to UK participation in G8 activities on renewable energy.

Research Collaborations

Collaborations through recent research projects

EPSRC Flexnet project, led by Imperial College London and with University of Strathclyde, University of Bath, University of Manchester, Cardiff University, University of Exeter, University of Edinburgh, Durham University, University of Birmingham, University of Cambridge. Collaboration with EDF Energy, National Grid, Scottish Power, Scottish and Southern Energy, CE Electric UK, Eon Central Networks

EPSRC/eon Transitions project and then Realising Transitions, led by Cardiff University and University of Bath and with University of East Anglia, University of Leeds, Loughborough University, University of Strathclyde, Imperial College London, University College London. Collaborating with eon UK

EPSRC ReVisions project, led by University of Cambridge and with University of Exeter, University of Leeds, Newcastle University, Aberystwyth University, University of Aberdeen. Collaborating with East of England Regional Development Agency (EEDA)

EPSRC AIA project, led by University of Exeter and with University of Bradford, Imperial College London, Cranfield University. Collaborating with Ashford's Future 

EPSRC REDUCE project at Surrey, led by the Centre for Communication Systems Research and with the department of Psychology. Collaborating with Woking Borough Council, Thales Research and Technology UK
University of Surrey's Estates and Facilities

EPSRC Local Nexus Network, led by University of Oxford and with University of Exeter, University of Cardiff, Newcastle University and University of Birmingham

Teaching

Within Surrey

Electronic Engineering Level 3, Business Administration: coordinating half module on Sustainable Development

CES MSc Transitions module: coordinating the module and variety of teaching 

CES MSc Environmental Economics module: lectures on project appraisal

CES MSc Environmental Science & Society module: lectures on climate change and energy

University of Surrey Global Graduate Award on Sustainability: lecture on energy

 

Externally

MSc in Energy at City University: lecture on sustainable development and energy

MSc in Environmental Technology at Imperial College London: full day introduction to electricity systems

Departmental Duties

Member of the University's Estate's Committee

Member of the University's Honorary Degrees Committee

Senior Tutor for Postgraduate Research Students within CES

Affiliations

Fellow of the Energy Institute

Member of the British Institute of Energy Economics

Member of the International Association of Energy Economics

Contact Me

E-mail:
Phone: 01483 68 9170

Find me on campus
Room: 08 BA 02


My office hours

Please email to arrange appointments, or see weekly office hours posted on office door

Publications

Highlights

  • Sadhukhan J, Zhao Y, Leach M, Brandon NP, Shah N. (2010) 'Energy Integration and Analysis of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Based Microcombined Heat and Power Systems and Other Renewable Systems Using Biomass Waste Derived Syngas'. AMER CHEMICAL SOC INDUSTRIAL & ENGINEERING CHEMISTRY RESEARCH, 49 (22), pp. 11506-11516.
  • Torriti J, Hassan MG, Leach M. (2010) 'Demand response experience in Europe: Policies, programmes and implementation'. PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD ENERGY, 35 (4), pp. 1575-1583.

    Abstract

    Over the last few years, load growth, increases in intermittent generation, declining technology costs and increasing recognition of the importance of customer behaviour in energy markets have brought about a change in the focus of Demand Response (DR) in Europe. The long standing programmes involving large industries, through interruptible tariffs and time of day pricing, have been increasingly complemented by programmes aimed at commercial and residential customer groups. Developments in DR vary substantially across Europe reflecting national conditions and triggered by different sets of policies, programmes and implementation schemes. This paper examines experiences within European countries as well as at European Union (EU) level, with the aim of understanding which factors have facilitated or impeded advances in DR. It describes initiatives, studies and policies of various European countries, with in-depth case studies of the UK, Italy and Spain. It is concluded that while business programmes, technical and economic potentials vary across Europe, there are common reasons as to why coordinated DR policies have been slow to emerge. This is because of the limited knowledge on DR energy saving capacities; high cost estimates for DR technologies and infrastructures; and policies focused on creating the conditions for liberalising the EU energy markets. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • Hawkes AD, Leach MA. (2009) 'Modelling high level system design and unit commitment for a microgrid'. ELSEVIER SCI LTD APPLIED ENERGY, 86 (7-8), pp. 1253-1265.
  • Hawkes AD, Leach MA. (2008) 'The capacity credit of micro-combined heat and power'. ELSEVIER SCI LTD ENERGY POLICY, 36 (4), pp. 1457-1469.
  • Gross R, Heptonstall P, Leach MA, Anderson D, Green T, Skea J. (2007) 'Renewables and the grid: understanding intermittency'. Thomas Telford Proceedings of Institution of Civil Engineers: Energy, 160, pp. 31-41.

Journal articles

  • Hargreaves A, Cheng V, Deshmukh S, Leach MA, Steemers K. (2017) 'Forecasting how residential urban form affects the regional carbon savings and costs of retrofitting and decentralized energy supply'. Elsevier Applied Energy, 186 (3), pp. 549-561.
  • Lopez-Aviles A, Veldhuis AJ, Leach M, Yang A. (2017) 'Energy and emissions in localised food systems: a case study of bread in the UK'. Applied Energy,
    [ Status: In preparation ]
  • Bradley P, Coke A, Leach M. (2016) 'Financial incentive approaches for reducing peak electricity demand, experience from pilot trials with a UK energy provider'. ELSEVIER SCI LTD ENERGY POLICY, 98, pp. 108-120.
  • Hang MYLP, Martinez-Hernandez E, Leach M, Yang A. (2016) 'Designing integrated local production systems: A study on the food-energy-water nexus'. ELSEVIER SCI LTD JOURNAL OF CLEANER PRODUCTION, 135, pp. 1065-1084.
  • Luqmani A, Leach M, Jesson DA. (2016) 'Factors behind sustainable business innovation: The case of a global carpet manufacturing company'. Elsevier Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions,
    [ Status: Accepted ]
  • Hang MYLP, Martinez-Hernandez E, Leach M, Yang A. (2016) 'Towards a coherent multi-level framework for resource accounting'. ELSEVIER SCI LTD JOURNAL OF CLEANER PRODUCTION, 125, pp. 204-215.
  • Bradley P, Fudge S, Leach M. (2016) 'Motivating energy conservation in organisations: smart metering and the emergence and diffusion of social norms'. ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD TECHNOLOGY ANALYSIS & STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT, 28 (4), pp. 435-461.
  • Satchatippavarn S, -Hernandez EM, Hang MYLP, Leach M, Yang A. (2016) 'Urban biorefinery for waste processing'. INST CHEMICAL ENGINEERS CHEMICAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH & DESIGN, 107, pp. 81-90.
  • Kumar P, Martani C, Morawska L, Norford L, Choudhary R, Bell M, Leach M. (2016) 'Indoor air quality and energy management through real-time sensing in commercial buildings'. ELSEVIER SCIENCE SA ENERGY AND BUILDINGS, 111, pp. 145-153.
  • Brown C, Jin Y, Leach M, Hodgson M. (2015) 'JADE: adaptive differential evolution with a small population'. SPRINGER SOFT COMPUTING, 20 (10), pp. 4111-4120.
  • Martinez-Hernandez E, Leach M, Yang A. (2015) 'Impact of bioenergy production on ecosystem dynamics and services-a case study on U.K. Heathlands.'. Environ Sci Technol, United States: 49 (9), pp. 5805-5812.
  • Hang MLP, Martinez-Hernandez E, Leach M, Yang A. (2015) 'Engineering Design of Localised Synergistic Production Systems'. ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV 12TH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON PROCESS SYSTEMS ENGINEERING AND 25TH EUROPEAN SYMPOSIUM ON COMPUTER AIDED PROCESS ENGINEERING, PT C, Copenhagen, DENMARK: 37, pp. 2363-2368.
  • Leach M, Deshmukh S, Ogunkunle D. (2014) 'Pathways to decarbonising urban systems'. , pp. 191-208.
  • Martinez-Hernandez E, Ibrahim MH, Leach M, Sinclair P, Campbell GM, Sadhukhan J. (2013) 'Environmental sustainability analysis of UK whole-wheat bioethanol and CHP systems'. Biomass and Bioenergy, 50, pp. 52-64.

    Abstract

    The UK whole-wheat bioethanol and straw and DDGS-based combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems were assessed for environmental sustainability using a range of impact categories or characterisations (IC): cumulative primary fossil energy (CPE), land use, life cycle global warming potential over 100 years (GWP100), acidification potential (AP), eutrophication potential (EP) and abiotic resources use (ARU). The European Union (EU) Renewable Energy Directive's target of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission saving of 60% in comparison to an equivalent fossil-based system by 2020 seems to be very challenging for stand-alone wheat bioethanol system. However, the whole-wheat integrated system, wherein the CHP from the excess straw grown in the same season and from the same land is utilised in the wheat bioethanol plant, can be demonstrated for potential sustainability improvement, achieving 85% emission reduction and 97% CPE saving compared to reference fossil systems. The net bioenergy from this system and from 172,370 ha of grade 3 land is 12.1 PJ y-1 providing land to energy yield of 70 GJ ha-1 y-1. The use of DDGS as an animal feed replacing soy meal incurs environmental emission credit, whilst its use in heat or CHP generation saves CPE. The hot spots in whole system identified under each impact category are as follows: bioethanol plant and wheat cultivation for CPE (50% and 48%), as well as for ARU (46% and 52%). EP and GWP100 are distributed among wheat cultivation (49% and 37%), CHP plant (26% and 30%) and bioethanol plant (25%, and 33%), respectively. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  • Bradley P, Leach M, Torriti J. (2013) 'A review of the costs and benefits of demand response for electricity in the UK'. Elsevier Energy Policy, 52, pp. 312-327.

    Abstract

    The recent policy discussion in the UK on the economic case for demand response (DR) calls for a reflection on available evidence regarding its costs and benefits. Existing studies tend to consider the size of investments and returns of certain forms of DR in isolation and do not consider economic welfare effects. From review of existing studies, policy documents, and some simple modelling of benefits of DR in providing reserve for unforeseen events, we demonstrate that the economic case for DR in UK electricity markets is positive. Consideration of economic welfare gains is provided. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  • Barton J, Thomson M, Huang S, Infield D, Leach M, Ogunkunle D, Torriti J. (2013) 'The evolution of electricity demand and the role for demand side participation, in buildings and transport'. Elsevier Energy Policy, 52, pp. 85-102.

    Abstract

    This paper explores the possible evolution of UK electricity demand as we move along three potential transition pathways to a low carbon economy in 2050. The shift away from fossil fuels through the electrification of demand is discussed, particularly through the uptake of heat pumps and electric vehicles in the domestic and passenger transport sectors. Developments in the way people and institutions may use energy along each of the pathways are also considered and provide a rationale for the quantification of future annual electricity demands in various broad sectors. The paper then presents detailed modelling of hourly balancing of these demands in the context of potential low carbon generation mixes associated with the three pathways. In all cases, hourly balancing is shown to be a significant challenge. To minimise the need for conventional generation to operate with very low capacity factors, a variety of demand side participation measures are modelled and shown to provide significant benefits. Lastly, projections of operational greenhouse gas emissions from the UK and the imports of fossil fuels to the UK for each of the three pathways are presented. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  • Torriti J, Leach M. (2012) 'Making the least active pay: A simulation of rewards and penalties under demand side participation programs'. TAYLOR & FRANCIS INC International Journal of Green Energy, 9 (7), pp. 584-596.

    Abstract

    The orthodox approach for incentivizing Demand Side Participation (DSP) programs is that utility losses from capital, installation and planning costs should be recovered under financial incentive mechanisms which aim to ensure that utilities have the right incentives to implement DSP activities. The recent national smart metering roll-out in the UK implies that this approach needs to be re-assessed since utilities will recover the capital costs associated with DSP technology through bills. This paper introduces a reward and penalty mechanism focusing on residential users. DSP planning costs are recovered through payments from those consumers who do not react to peak signals. Those consumers who do react are rewarded by paying lower bills. Because real-time incentives to residential consumers tend to fail due to the negligible amounts associated with net gains (and losses) for individual users, in the proposed mechanism the regulator determines benchmarks which are matched against responses to signals and caps the level of rewards/penalties to avoid market distortions. The paper presents an overview of existing financial incentive mechanisms for DSP; introduces the reward/penalty mechanism aimed at fostering DSP under the hypothesis of smart metering roll-out; considers the costs faced by utilities for DSP programs; assesses linear rate effects and value changes; introduces compensatory weights for those consumers who have physical or financial impediments; and shows findings based on simulation runs on three discrete levels of elasticity. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  • Hong J, Johnstone C, Torriti J, Leach M. (2012) 'Discrete demand side control performance under dynamic building simulation: a heat pump application'. Elsevier Renewable Energy, 39 (1), pp. 85-95.

    Abstract

    This study presents the findings of applying a Discrete Demand Side Control (DDSC) approach to the space heating of two case study buildings. High and low tolerance scenarios are implemented on the space heating controller to assess the impact of DDSC upon buildings with different thermal capacitances, light-weight and heavy-weight construction. Space heating is provided by an electric heat pump powered from a wind turbine, with a back-up electrical network connection in the event of insufficient wind being available when a demand occurs. Findings highlight that thermal comfort is maintained within an acceptable range while the DDSC controller maintains the demand/supply balance. Whilst it is noted that energy demand increases slightly, as this is mostly supplied from the wind turbine, this is of little significance and hence a reduction in operating costs and carbon emissions is still attained.

  • Jensen PD, Basson L, Hellawell EE, Leach M. (2012) ''Habitat' Suitability Index Mapping for Industrial Symbiosis Planning'. Wiley Journal of Industrial Ecology, 16 (1), pp. 38-50.

    Abstract

    By ‘working with the willing’, the National Industrial Symbiosis Programme (NISP) has successfully facilitated industrial symbiosis throughout the United Kingdom and, in the process, delivered significant economic and environmental benefits for both Programme members and the country as a whole. One of the keys to NISP's success is that, unlike failed attempts to plan and construct eco-industrial systems from scratch, the Programme works largely with existing companies who have already settled in, developed, and successfully operate within a given locale. This article argues that existing and mature industrial systems provide the best prospects for identifying opportunities for, and ultimately facilitating, industrial symbiosis. Due to levels of diversification and operational fundamental niches that, in the fullness of time, develop within all industrial systems, industrially mature areas are deemed to be industrial symbiosis ‘conducive environments’. Building on the conservation biology concept of a habitat suitability index, the article presents a methodology for comparing a potential site for eco-industrial development to a known baseline industrial ‘habitat’ already identified as being highly conducive to industrial symbiosis. The suitability index methodology is further developed and applied to a multi-criteria evaluation geographic information system to produce a ‘habitat’ suitability map that allows practitioners to quickly identify potential industrial symbiosis hotspots (the methodology is illustrated for England). The article concludes by providing options for the development of symbiosis suitability indices and how they can be used to support the facilitation of industrial symbiosis and regional resource efficiency.

  • Gross R, Heptonstall P, Leach M, Skea J, Anderson D, Green T. (2012) 'The uk energy research centre review of the costs and impacts of intermittency'. , pp. 73-94.
  • Jensen, P.D , Basson, L. , Leach M. (2011) 'Reinterpreting Industrial Ecology'. Journal of Industrial Ecology, 15 (5), pp. 680-692.
  • Chalmers H, Gibbins J, Leach M. (2011) 'Valuing power plant flexibility with CCS: the case of post-combustion capture retrofits'. Springer Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, 17 (6), pp. 621-649.

    Abstract

    An important development in recent years has been increased interest in retrofitting CO2 capture at existing power plants. In parallel, it has also been suggested that flexible operation of power plants with CO2 capture could be important in at least some jurisdictions. It is likely that retrofitted power plants could have significant ‘built-in’ flexibility, but this potential is often not considered in studies of the economic performance of power plants with CO2 capture. This paper makes a contribution to filling this gap by developing methods for first order screening analysis of flexible operation of power plants with CO2 capture and applying them to the case study example of an appropriately integrated retrofit of post-combustion capture at a coal-fired power plant. The quantitative analysis suggests that rich solvent storage could be an attractive option on a short-run basis for some fuel, CO2 and electricity price combinations. Results from first order analysis can then be used to determine which operating modes should (and shouldn’t) be included in further, more detailed design studies.

  • Jensen PD, Basson L, Hellawell E, Bailey MR, Leach M. (2011) 'Quantifying ‘geographic proximity’: Experiences from the United Kingdom's National Industrial Symbiosis Programme'. Elsevier Resources, Conservation and Recycling, 55 (7), pp. 703-712.

    Abstract

    Geographic proximity is said to be a key characteristic of the resource reuse and recycling practice known as industrial symbiosis. To date, however, proximity of symbiont companies has remained an abstract characteristic. By conducting a statistical analysis of synergies facilitated by the United Kingdom's National Industrial Symbiosis Programme during their first five years of operation, this article attempts to quantify geographic proximity and in the process provide practitioners with an insight into the movement trends of different waste streams. Among other it was found that the median distance materials travelled within a symbiotic relationship is 20.4 miles. It is argued that quantitative information of this form is of practical value for the effective deployment of industrial symbiosis practitioners and wider resource efficiency planning. The results and discussion presented within this article are specific to industrial symbiosis opportunities facilitated within the United Kingdom; the methodology and assessment of resource movement influences are, however, expected to be relevant to all countries in which industrial activity is similarly mature and diversified.

  • Kapila RV, Chalmers H, Haszeldine S, Leach M. (2011) 'CCS prospects in India: Results from an expert stakeholder survey'. Elsevier Energy Procedia, 4, pp. 6280-6287.
  • Chalmers H, Leach M, Gibbins J. (2011) 'Built-in flexibility at retrofitted power plants: What is it worth and can we afford to ignore it?'. Energy Procedia, 4, pp. 2596-2603.
  • Sadhukhan J, Zhao Y, Leach M, Brandon NP, Shah N. (2010) 'Energy Integration and Analysis of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Based Microcombined Heat and Power Systems and Other Renewable Systems Using Biomass Waste Derived Syngas'. AMER CHEMICAL SOC INDUSTRIAL & ENGINEERING CHEMISTRY RESEARCH, 49 (22), pp. 11506-11516.
  • Torriti J, Hassan MG, Leach M. (2010) 'Demand response experience in Europe: Policies, programmes and implementation'. PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD ENERGY, 35 (4), pp. 1575-1583.

    Abstract

    Over the last few years, load growth, increases in intermittent generation, declining technology costs and increasing recognition of the importance of customer behaviour in energy markets have brought about a change in the focus of Demand Response (DR) in Europe. The long standing programmes involving large industries, through interruptible tariffs and time of day pricing, have been increasingly complemented by programmes aimed at commercial and residential customer groups. Developments in DR vary substantially across Europe reflecting national conditions and triggered by different sets of policies, programmes and implementation schemes. This paper examines experiences within European countries as well as at European Union (EU) level, with the aim of understanding which factors have facilitated or impeded advances in DR. It describes initiatives, studies and policies of various European countries, with in-depth case studies of the UK, Italy and Spain. It is concluded that while business programmes, technical and economic potentials vary across Europe, there are common reasons as to why coordinated DR policies have been slow to emerge. This is because of the limited knowledge on DR energy saving capacities; high cost estimates for DR technologies and infrastructures; and policies focused on creating the conditions for liberalising the EU energy markets. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • Sealy I, Wehrmeyer W, France C, Leach M. (2010) 'Sustainable development management systems in global business organizations'. Management Research Review, 33 (11), pp. 1083-1096.
  • Staffell I, Baker P, Barton JP, Bergman N, Blanchard R, Brandon NP, Brett DJL, Hawkes A, Infield D, Jardine CN, Kelly N, Leach M, Matian M, Peacock AD, Sudtharalingam S, Woodman B. (2010) 'UK microgeneration. Part II: Technology overviews'. Proceedings of Institution of Civil Engineers: Energy, 163 (4), pp. 143-165.
  • Candelise C, Gross R, Leach MA. (2010) 'Conditions for photovoltaics deployment in the UK: the role of policy and technical developments'. PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING PUBLISHING LTD PROCEEDINGS OF THE INSTITUTION OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS PART A-JOURNAL OF POWER AND ENERGY, 224 (A2), pp. 153-166.
  • Hawkes AD, Leach MA. (2009) 'Modelling high level system design and unit commitment for a microgrid'. ELSEVIER SCI LTD APPLIED ENERGY, 86 (7-8), pp. 1253-1265.
  • Yassin L, Lettieri P, Simons SJR, Castillo-Castillo A, Leach M, Ryu C, Swithenbank J, Sharifi V. (2009) 'From incineration to advanced fluid-bed gasification of waste'. Proceedings of Institution of Civil Engineers: Waste and Resource Management, 162 (3), pp. 169-177.
  • Castillo-Castillo A, Leach M, Yassin L, Lettieri P, Simons SJR, Ryu C, Swithenbank J, Sharifi V. (2009) 'Thermal technology scales in future waste management strategies'. Proceedings of Institution of Civil Engineers: Waste and Resource Management, 162 (3), pp. 151-168.
  • Exarchakos L, Leach M, Exarchakos G. (2009) 'Modelling electricity storage systems management under the influence of demand-side management programmes'. JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESEARCH, 33 (1), pp. 62-76.
  • Chalmers H, Leach M, Lucquiaud M, Gibbins J. (2009) 'Valuing flexible operation of power plants with CO2 capture'. ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV GREENHOUSE GAS CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES 9, Washington, DC: 1 (1), pp. 4289-4296.
  • Bergman N, Hawkes A, Brett DJL, Baker P, Barton J, Blanchard R, Brandon NP, Infield D, Jardine C, Kelly N, Leach M, Matian M, Peacock AD, Staffell I, Sudtharalingam S, Woodman B. (2009) 'UK microgeneration. Part I: Policy and behavioural aspects'. Proceedings of Institution of Civil Engineers: Energy, 162 (1), pp. 23-36.
  • Chalmers H, Lucquiaud M, Gibbins J, Leach M. (2009) 'Flexible Operation of Coal Fired Power Plants with Postcombustion Capture of Carbon Dioxide'. ASCE-AMER SOC CIVIL ENGINEERS JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING-ASCE, 135 (6), pp. 449-458.
  • Hawkes AD, Leach MA. (2008) 'The capacity credit of micro-combined heat and power'. ELSEVIER SCI LTD ENERGY POLICY, 36 (4), pp. 1457-1469.
  • Di Castelnuovo M, Leach M, Pearson P. (2008) 'An analysis of spatial pricing and renewable generation in the British electricity system'. International Journal of Global Energy Issues, 29 (1-2), pp. 199-220.
  • Keirstead J, Leach M. (2008) 'Bridging the Gaps Between Theory and Practice: a Service Niche Approach to Urban Sustainability Indicators'. JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT, 16 (5), pp. 329-340.
  • Skea J, Anderson D, Green T, Gross R, Heptonstall P, Leach M. (2008) 'Intermittent renewable generation and the cost of maintaining power system reliability'. INST ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY-IET IET GENERATION TRANSMISSION & DISTRIBUTION, 2 (1), pp. 82-89.
  • Hawkes AD, Leach MA. (2008) 'On policy instruments for support of micro combined heat and power'. Energy Policy, 36 (8), pp. 2963-2972.
  • Hawkes AD, Leach MA. (2007) 'Cost-effective operating strategy for residential micro-combined heat and power'. PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD ENERGY, 32 (5), pp. 711-723.
  • Hawkes AD, Aguiar P, Croxford B, Leach MA, Adjiman CS, Brandon NP. (2007) 'Solid oxide fuel cell micro combined heat and power system operating strategy: Options for provision of residential space and water heating'. ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV JOURNAL OF POWER SOURCES, 164 (1), pp. 260-271.
  • Chalmers H, Gibbins J, Leach M. (2007) 'Site specific considerations for investments in new coal-fired power plants with CO2 capture'. 24th Annual International Pittsburgh Coal Conference 2007, PCC 2007, 1, pp. 95-113.
  • Gross R, Heptonstall P, Leach MA, Anderson D, Green T, Skea J. (2007) 'Renewables and the grid: understanding intermittency'. Thomas Telford Proceedings of Institution of Civil Engineers: Energy, 160, pp. 31-41.
  • Hawkes AD, Aguiar P, Hernandez-Aramburo CA, Leach MA, Brandon NP, Green TC, Adjiman CS. (2006) 'Techno-economic modelling of a solid oxide fuel cell stack for micro combined heat and power'. ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV JOURNAL OF POWER SOURCES, 156 (2), pp. 321-333.
  • Exarchakos L, Leach M. (2006) 'Electricity storage and demand-side management: Is their co-existence possible?'. Series on Energy and Power Systems, 2006, pp. 207-212.
  • Hawkes A, Leach MA. (2005) 'Solid oxide fuel cell systems for residential micro-combined heat and power in the UK: Key economic drivers'. ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV Journal of Power Sources, 149, pp. 72-83.
  • Hawkes A, Leach M. (2005) 'Impacts of temporal precision in optimisation modelling of micro-combined heat and power'. PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD ENERGY, 30 (10), pp. 1759-1779.
  • Knight O, Leach MA. (2005) 'The development of concentrating PV-thermal technologies and their potential to reduce the cost of solar power'. Solar Energy, (April)
  • Anderson D, Leach MA. (2005) 'The Costs of Mitigating Climate Change'. World Economics: the journal of current economic analysis and policy, 6 (3), pp. 71-90.
  • Anderson D, Leach M. (2004) 'Harvesting and redistributing renewable energy: on the role of gas and electricity grids to overcome intermittency through the generation and storage of hydrogen'. ELSEVIER SCI LTD ENERGY POLICY, 32 (14), pp. 1603-1614.
  • Gross R, Leach M, Bauen A. (2003) 'Progress in renewable energy.'. Environ Int, United States: 29 (1), pp. 105-122.
  • Butler D, Jowitt P, Ashley R, Blackwood D, Leach MA. (2003) 'SWARD: decision support processes for the UK water industry'. Management of Environmental Quality, 14 (4), pp. 444-459.
  • Barnes-Regueiro F, Leach M, Ruth M. (2002) 'The Mexican energy sector: integrated dynamic analysis of the natural gas/refining system'. ELSEVIER SCI LTD ENERGY POLICY, 30 (9) Article number PII S0301-4215(01)00137-9 , pp. 767-779.
  • Karakoussis V, Brandon NP, Leach A, Leach M, van der Vorst R. (2001) 'The environmental impact of manufacturing planar and tubular solid oxide fuel cells'. ELSEVIER SCIENCE SA JOURNAL OF POWER SOURCES, 101 (1), pp. 10-26.
  • Grimston MC, Karakoussis V, Fouquet R, van der Vorst R, Pearson P, Leach M. (2001) 'The European and global potential of carbon dioxide sequestration in tackling climate change'. CLIMATE POLICY, 1 (2), pp. 155-171.
  • Jones E, Leach M, Wade J. (2000) 'Local policies for DSM: the UK's home energy conservation act'. ELSEVIER SCI LTD ENERGY POLICY, 28 (3), pp. 201-211.
  • Hart D, Leach MA, Bauen A, Fouquet R, Pearson P. (2000) 'Methanol infrastructure - will it affect the introduction of SPFC vehicles?'. ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV Journal of Power Sources, 86 (1-2), pp. 542-547.
  • Foxon TJ, Butler D, Dawes JK, Hutchinson D, Leach MA, Pearson PJG, Rose D. (2000) 'An assessment of water demand management options from a systems approach'. Journal of the Chartered Institution of Water and Environmental Management, 14 (3), pp. 171-178.
  • Jones E, Leach MA. (2000) 'Devolving domestic energy efficiency responsibility to local government: the case of HECA'. Local Environment: the international journal of justice and sustainability, 5, pp. 69-81.
  • Foxon TJ, Leach M, Butler D, Dawes J, Hutchinson D, Pearson P, Rose D. (1999) 'Useful indicators of urban sustainability: Some methodological issues'. Local Environment, 4 (2), pp. 137-149.
  • Leach M. (1997) 'Not for burning?'. NEW SCIENTIST PUBL EXPEDITING INC NEW SCIENTIST, 156 (2112), pp. 56-56.
  • Leach MA, Bauen A, Lucas NJD. (1997) 'A Systems Approach to Materials Flow in Sustainable Cities. Case study of paper'. Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, 40, pp. 705-723.
  • LEACH M, LUCAS N. (1993) 'ENERGY INTENSITY AND STRUCTURAL-CHANGE IN EASTERN-EUROPE - METHODOLOGY AND CASE-STUDY OF HUNGARY'. JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENERGY RESEARCH, 17 (9), pp. 873-884.

Conference papers

  • Hargreaves A, Cheng V, Deshmukh S, Leach M, Steemers K. (2017) 'Forecasting how residential urban form affects the regional carbon savings and costs of retrofitting and decentralized energy supply'. ELSEVIER SCI LTD APPLIED ENERGY, Newcastle upon Tyne, ENGLAND: 3rd International Conference on Sustainable Thermal Energy Management (SusTEM) 186, pp. 549-561.
  • Zhang J, Basson L, Leach M. (2009) 'Review of Life Cycle Assessment Studies of Coal-fired Power Plants with Carbon Capture and Storage'. IEEE 2009 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON SUSTAINABLE POWER GENERATION AND SUPPLY, VOLS 1-4, Nanjing, PEOPLES R CHINA: International Conference on Sustainable Power Generation and Supply, pp. 2108-2114.
  • Hawkes A, Leach M. (2005) 'Solid oxide fuel cell systems for residential micro-combined heat and power in the UK: Key economic drivers'. ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV JOURNAL OF POWER SOURCES, San Antonio, TX: Fuel Cell Seminar 2004 149, pp. 72-83.
  • Hart D, Leach MA, Lucas NJD, Hutchinson D. (1996) 'Strategies and system concepts for hydrogen utilisation in an urban environment'. DECHEMA HYDROGEN ENERGY PROGRESS XI, VOLS 1-3, STUTTGART, GERMANY: 11th World Hydrogen Energy Conference (11 WHEC), pp. 329-332.

Book chapters

  • Cottee J, Lopez-Aviles A, Behzadian K, Bradley D, Butler D, Downing C, Farmani R, Ingram J, Leach M, Pike A, De Propris L, Purvis L, Robinson P, Yang A. (2016) 'The Local Nexus Network: Exploring the Future of Localised Food Systems and Associated Energy and Water Supply'. SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN 52, pp. 613-624.
  • Torriti J, Leach M, Devine-Wright P. (2012) 'Demand-side participation: Price constraints, technical limits and behavioural risks'. in (ed.) The Future of Electricity Demand: Customers, Citizens and Loads , pp. 88-105.
  • Chalmers H, Gibbins J, Lucquiaud M, Leach M. (2009) 'Introducing CCS: Potential changes in coalfired power plant design, operation and regulation in a carbon constrained future'. in (ed.) Carbon Capture and Storage including Coal-Fired Power Plants , pp. 57-78.

Reports

  • Lopez-Aviles A, Leach M. (2016) Local Nexus Network for Re-Distributed Manufacturing: Energy Feasibility Study. Final Report. Local Nexus Network (LNN)

    Abstract

    Executive Summary. The Food-Energy-Water Local Nexus Network (LNN) for redistributed manufacturing focuses on the development of local nexuses of food manufacturing and energy and water supply which may provide opportunities for rationally customising resource utilisation, production, and consumption while contributing to the shared prosperity between business and community, and between human society and natural ecosystems. This network involves a multidisciplinary academic team across six UK universities working with representative stakeholders that will study the local nexuses along four research themes: engineering, business, policy and society, and systems integration. Two case study locales provide a common background for different research themes to interact and integrate, and will serve purposes ranging from collection of empirical data to stakeholder engagement. These two case studies represent respectively situations of “new development”, (Northstowe, Cambridgeshire, where opportunities exist to introduce a new food, energy and water system), and “retrofitting” (Oxford, where an existing system is to be changed to benefit from the paradigm of local nexuses). The work will be developed through six inter-related feasibility projects. This report covers the work undertaken to date within the Energy Feasibility Study. The specific objectives of the Energy Feasibility study are: 1. Assess requirements for energy supply (electricity and heat of different qualities) to localised food systems (e.g. production, storage), including typical temporal (diurnal and seasonal) variations 2. Assess opportunities for energy integration across the local supply and production chains (e.g. CO2 emissions to be used in green-houses to aid tomatoes ripen, re-use heat loss from cooling down after evaporation etc.). 3. Assess potential for energy recovery from waste arisings from food production across the local supply chain, plus arisings from local water/wastewater treatment systems 4. Develop local energy system scenarios, including other potential users 5. Evaluate energy generation and storage technologies suitable for implementing the scenarios: efficiency, cost effectiveness, safety, and environmental impact Based on the objectives above, existing literature and data were reviewed on the Nexus and the linkages between Energy and Water, Energy and Food etc. A review of existing academic and grey literature and data on energy use for the production of two chosen foo

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