Gary Rivers

Dr Gary Rivers


Dean (Operations) Surrey International Institute, Dongbei University of Finance & Economics
BA(Social Sciences), Grad Cert (L&T), PG Dip (Bus), MBus (Distinction), PhD
Winter GMT+8 / Summer GMT+7
Assistant: Ms Regina Yuan
+86 (0)411 8471 0211

University roles and responsibilities

  • Dean (Operations) SII-DUFE
  • Member, SII Executive Group
  • Observer, SII Joint Management Committee
  • Member, SII Senior Management Committee
  • Member, DUFE-UoS Finance Committee
  • Chair, SII L&T Committee
  • Chair, SII Business Academics’ Staff Meeting
  • Academic Integrity Officer
  • Member, SII Joint Research Committee
  • Member, SII Student-Staff Liaison Committee

My publications

Publications

Jashim Khan, Na Zuo, Gary Rivers (2017)The effect of country-of-origin on new zealand consumers beer purchasing behavior, In: Jurnal Manajemen dan Kewirausahaan19(1)pp. 1-4 Petra Christian University

Country of Origin (COO) sits along with marketing mix factor in the global market place. Given the im­portance of COO, studies have touched the field of COO effects, though studies pertaining to alco­ho­lic beve­rage purchase behavior, particularly in the New Zealand remains limited. This study explores the potential im­pact of demographics on the magnitude of Country of Origin effects for two lager beer pro­ducts. The data was collected via survey format from 211 respondents living in Auckland, New Zea­land. The results from this study suggest that older consumers are more dependent upon the country of ori­gin information when evaluating a pro­duct and, particularly when presented with unfamiliar brands, they tend to perceive imported lager beer as being of hi­gher qu­al­i­ty, more trendy and more value for mo­ney. Also customer perceptions differ based on the cus­tomer’s socio-economic status. Middle income cus­­tomers are more likely to have favorable opinions about imported products, whereas, lower and higher income customers tend to have weaker views on this issue.

JASHIM KHAN, GARY RIVERS, S Gaur, A Quazi, Na Zuo, Sunil D Bhatia (2018)Do fellow-feelings and organisational harmony matter for logistic firms?, In: Asia Pacific journal of marketing and logistics30(5)pp. 1319-1346 Emerald Publishing Limited

Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the mediating role of organisational harmony and fellow-feelings in the relationship between intelligence generations, dissemination and implementation on business performance and explain how market orientation impacts certain aspects of organisational behaviour which in turn lead to the performance of service firms. Design/methodology/approach The data set comprises 108 responses of senior managers within the logistics sector. The multi-level sequential mediation path analysis is used to examine the above mediating role. Findings Results indicate that intelligence dissemination (ID), response implementation (RI) and business performance relationship is significantly mediated via fellow-feelings and organisational harmony. However, the relationship between dissemination, implementation and overall business performance is mostly mediated by fellow-feelings and followed by organisational harmony. Furthermore, when overall market orientation (intelligence generation, dissemination and RI) is used as a determinant of business performance, organsiational harmony emerged as the most significant contributor to organsiational performance. Practical implications Managers are urged to focus on building fellow-feelings among their employees, resulting in a harmonious work environment between functional units and market orientation organisation wide. Originality/value Compared to previous research, this is one of the first attempts to develop an understanding of fellow-feelings, contributing to organsiational harmony resulting market orientation and, hence, business performance. Market orientation conceptualisations lump intelligence generation, dissemination and RI of business activities together but do not explain how market orientation impacts fellow-feelings and organisational harmony which in turn leads to performance. The authors specifically address this important lacuna in our conceptualisation and propose that ID and RI lead to fellow-feelings within functional departments and results in organisational harmony.

JASHIM KHAN, Sharyn Rundle-Thiele, GARY RIVERS (2018)Insights Into Chinese Diets: A Social Marketing Formative Study, In: Diana Bogueva, Dora Marinova, Talia Raphaely (eds.), Handbook of Research on Social Marketing and Its Influence on Animal Origin Food Product Consumptionpp. 251-266 IGI Global

As marketing professionals look for more effective ways to promote their goods and services to customers, a thorough understanding of customer needs and the ability to predict a target audience’s reaction to advertising campaigns is essential. The Handbook of Research on Social Marketing and Its Influence on Animal Origin Food Product Consumption is a critical scholarly resource that examines the role of social marketing in understanding and changing behavior regarding the negative impacts of consuming animal-based foods. Featuring coverage on a broad range of topics, such as the psychology of meat consumption, food waste, and meat substitutes, this publication is geared towards academicians, students, and professionals seeking current research on social marketing interventions and the demarketing of meat. As marketing professionals look for more effective ways to promote their goods and services to customers, a thorough understanding of customer needs and the ability to predict a target audience’s reaction to advertising campaigns is essential. The Handbook of Research on Social Marketing and Its Influence on Animal Origin Food Product Consumption is a critical scholarly resource that examines the role of social marketing in understanding and changing behavior regarding the negative impacts of consuming animal-based foods. Featuring coverage on a broad range of topics, such as the psychology of meat consumption, food waste, and meat substitutes, this publication is geared towards academicians, students, and professionals seeking current research on social marketing interventions and the demarketing of meat.