Peter Jones

Professor Peter Jones


Emeritus Professor
+44 (0)1483 68
44 MS 02

Academic and research departments

School of Hospitality and Tourism Management.

Biography

My publications

Publications

Georgiou P, Johan N, Jones P (2010) Patterns of inflight alcohol consumption: A study of British holiday makers, Tourism and Hospitality Research 10 (3) pp. 188-205
This study aims to investigate whether alcohol consumption by passengers when travelling was the same or different to their normal pattern. On the basis of 236 surveys completed by British passengers on Cyprus Airways flights, this study compares and contrasts their normal and in-flight alcohol consumption patterns. The overall results were analysed, followed with analysis within the sub-groups and from various demographic perspectives. Some significant differences from the habitual alcohol consumption behaviours (for example based on age, gender and marital status) are noted and discussed. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Ltd.
Jones PLM, Chang YC (2007) Implementation of mass customised manufacturing in the flight ctaering industry, In: Airey D, Tribe J (eds.), Advances in Tourism Research Elsevier
Jones PLM, Putamononda P, Lumbers M (2009) A preliminary study of how airlines plan for their passenger's on board meal experience,
Jones PLM, Lockwood A, Bowen A (2004) The UK's Industry Forum Adaptation Programme in Tourism and Hospitality: a collaboration between government, industry and academia,
Despite the continuous increase of investment in information and communication technologies (ICT) in the tourism industry, empirical studies have not persuasively established corresponding increases in productivity. Indeed several shortcomings have been identified in past studies. This study proposes a new way of assessing ICT productivity. The methodology is tested in a data set from the three-star hotel sector in the United Kingdom using a nonparametric technique called data envelopment analysis (DEA). Empirical findings reveal that productivity gains accrue not from investments per se, but from the full exploitation of the ICT networking and informationalization capabilities. A model for managing ICT applications and benefits is proposed. © 2004 Sage Publications.
Johan N, Jones P (2007) Forecasting the Demand for Airline Meals,
Jones PLM (2005) Flight Catering in the Spotlight, Hospitality Review 5 (13)
Jones P (2008) Handbook of Hospitality Operations and IT, Butterworth-Heinemann
Handbook of Hospitality Operations and IT provides an authoritative resource for critical reviews of research into both operations and IT management.
Lockwood AJ, Jones P, Airey D, Sigala M (2004) ICT paradox lost? A stepwise DEA methodology, Journal of Travel Research 43 pp. 180-192
Johan N, Jones P (2008) Trends in Flight Catering Industry: 2008 Survey Report,
Jones PLM, Groenenboom K (2002) Crime in London Hotels, Tourism and Hospitality Research 4 (1) pp. 21-36
Jones PLM (2004) Finding Hospitality? Or finding Hospitality Schools of thought?, Journal of Hospitality, Leisure, Sport and Tourism Education 3 (1)
It is surprising that little empirical research has been conducted in the area of service productivity given its impact on organisational costs. In order to try to encourage such research, this paper provides a structure for analysing productivity in service organisations by distinguishing between operational and customer productivity. The paper also clarifies the meaning of ?productivity? and differentiates it from efficiency and utilisation. The authors identify some of the problems in measuring productivity, especially in a service setting, and then use a few examples to illustrate the sometimes counterintuitive relationship between operational and customer productivity.
This article reports the findings of in?depth interviews with security managers from some of London?s top hotels. What emerges is a range of different approaches to executing security policy. Key issues are identified in relation to the balance between providing hospitality and security, the degree of overt security, and the contribution that security staff make to the success of the business. Whilst there is a shift away from a focus on security against criminal threat towards broader concerns with health and safety, these hotels have not yet adopted the loss prevention strategies developed in the USA.
Purpose

The purpose of this study is to gain insight into factors that contribute to the success in high contact new service development (NSD) projects.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via questionnaires from hospitality managers knowledgeable about NSD in their organization (sample size =183; response rate 38.1 percent). Discriminant analysis was used to identify the factors that are responsible for successful high contact NSD projects in the hospitality industry.

Findings

Research results indicate that seven factors play a distinctive role in the outcome of high contact NSD: market attractiveness, strategic human resource management, market responsiveness, empowerment, training of employees, employee commitment and marketing synergy.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted in only one industry (hospitality) and one country (Germany) and included only the views of managers.

Practical implications

This study outlines the importance of human resource management factors in high contact NSD success. Findings from previous NSD success studies in low contact service industries have been only partly confirmed.

Originality/value

This study expands the scope of NSD research.

This report provides an overview of practitioners? opinions on seven external issues and 15 industry trends affecting the travel catering industry, drawing on data from a survey conducted at the ITCA Trade Show and Conference in Cologne, Germany March 7-9th, 2007. The respondents represent the four major sectors of the industry from around the world, allowing evaluation of their responses on both a sectoral and regional basis.

Major External Issues

" Hike in oil price is the issue of the overall highest concern within the industry (3.66), while human flu outbreak is the issue of the overall least concern (2.97).

" Corresponding to their level of concern, hike in oil price (3.65) is perceived to have the most impact on the industry?s business performance. The issue with the perceived least impact on the industry is climate change (2.83).

" Some similarities are identified for both climate change and increased passenger security measures across level of concern and impact. Airlines are not only more concerned about the two issues than suppliers, but also perceive more impact from these issues than food suppliers.

" Some significant differences are also identified. Although there is a significant difference between food supplier and other sectors in the level of concern on terrorists? attacks in major cities, there are no differences in terms of level of impact. Whereas a significant difference is identified between non-food suppliers and airlines on higher taxation on air travel, no difference is identified on their level of concern.

Major Industry Trends

" Increased competition in the airline industry (3.46) is the issue of the overall highest concern, whereas adoption of RFID for equipment tracking (2.24) is the trend of the overall least concern.

" Corresponding to their level of involvement, increased competition in the airline industry (3.62) is perceived to have the most impact on the industry?s daily operations, while the adoption of RFID for equipment tracking (2.4) is perceived as having the overall lowest impact. "

Some similarities across level of concern and impact are identified for five trends: increased competition in the airline industry, increased security management, outsourcing of food production, increased branded food products on tray sets and increased concern on food safety and health. "

Significant differences are identified. Four trends show significant differences in the level of concern, but not on the level of impacts: outsourcing of catering logistics function, increase use of internet based IT, increase in single seat class airlines, and reduction in packaging.

" On the other hand, significant differences were noted on the perceived level o impact of the increased role of distributors, but not on the level of concern.

This report provides an overview of practitioners? opinions on seven external issues and 15 industry trends affecting the travel catering industry, drawing on data from a survey conducted at the ITCA Trade Show and Conference in Cologne, Germany March 7-9th, 2007. The respondents represent the four major sectors of the industry from around the world, allowing evaluation of their responses on both a sectoral and regional basis.

Major External Issues

" Hike in oil price is the issue of the overall highest concern within the industry (3.66), while human flu outbreak is the issue of the overall least concern (2.97).

" Corresponding to their level of concern, hike in oil price (3.65) is perceived to have the most impact on the industry?s business performance. The issue with the perceived least impact on the industry is climate change (2.83).

" Some similarities are identified for both climate change and increased passenger security measures across level of concern and impact. Airlines are not only more concerned about the two issues than suppliers, but also perceive more impact from these issues than food suppliers.

" Some significant differences are also identified.

Although there is a significant difference between food supplier and other sectors in the level of concern on terrorists? attacks in major cities, there are no differences in terms of level of impact. Whereas a significant difference is identified between non-food suppliers and airlines on higher taxation on air travel, no difference is identified on their level of concern.

Major Industry Trends

" Increased competition in the airline industry (3.46) is the issue of the overall highest concern, whereas adoption of RFID for equipment tracking (2.24) is the trend of the overall least concern.

" Corresponding to their level of involvement, increased competition in the airline industry (3.62) is perceived to have the most impact on the industry?s daily operations, while the adoption of RFID for equipment tracking (2.4) is perceived as having the overall lowest impact.

" Some similarities across level of concern and impact are identified for five trends: increased competition in the airline industry, increased security management, outsourcing of food production, increased branded food products on tray sets and increased concern on food safety and health.

" Significant differences are identified. Four trends show significant differences in the level of concern, but not on the level of impacts: outsourcing of catering logistics function, increase use of internet based IT, increase in single seat class airlines, and reduction in packaging.

" On the other hand, significant differences were noted on the perceived level o impact of the increased role of distributors, but not on the level of concern.