Rachael Cooke

Rachael Cooke


Comparative Pathology Clinical Academic Group (CAG) Administrator

Biography

Biography

Rachael spent 15 years in the IT industry working for a global IT consultancy company as a Senior Consultant. After taking a career break to have children, she worked at a local junior school for three and a half years as a School Administrator before joining the School of Veterinary Medicine in September 2015.

Rachael has owned horses for over 30 years and has previously competed in show jumping and dressage events at riding club level. She specialises in the care of veteran equines, particularly those over the age of 30!

Departmental duties

Organisation of CAG events, provision of administrative support to CAG members, arranging and administering Steering Group Meetings, implementation of CAG publicity, provision of support for bids for funding. Provision of Vet School reception cover and lunchtime cover for Surrey Post Mortem telephone service as required. Administrative support for Badger TB project.

My publications

Publications

W. J.S. Lockley, A McEwen, RACHAEL COOKE (2012)Tritium: a coming of age for drug discovery and development ADME studies, In: Journal of labelled compounds & radiopharmaceuticals55(7)pp. 235-257 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd

Owing to recent developments in tritium chemistry and analysis, high‐quality tritium‐labelled drugs can now be prepared simply, cheaply and in timescales commensurate with those needed for rapid drug discovery in adsorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) projects. Such 3H‐labelled drugs are enabling high‐quality decision‐making at key points in the drug discovery process, thus ensuring more effective research projects, a key issue in commercial success. In addition, tritium‐labelled compounds continue to play a significant role in ADME studies later in the pharmaceutical development process. This is especially so for highly potent and hence low‐dose agents, for drugs with complex structures and for those compounds that undergo molecular fragmentation as a result of metabolism. Recent developments in tritium chemistry and analysis mean that high‐quality tritium‐labelled drugs can now be prepared simply, cheaply and in timescales commensurate with those needed for rapid drug discovery projects. This rapid‐labelling approach is ensuring more effective pharmaceutical research projects, a key issue in commercial success. At later stages in the pharmaceutical development process, the same tritium labelling and analysis methodologies can also be utilised to support high quality adsorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion studies.