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Published: 14 October 2014

Dr Alan Dalton appointed as UM Academic Icon

The University of Surrey’s on-going collaboration with the University of Malaya (UM) has been further strengthened with the appointment of a second Surrey academic as an Academic Icon.

Dr Dalton, a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Physics, joins an elite group of internationally-established scientists and follows in the footsteps of Professor of radiation and medical physics David Bradley, who became an Academic Icon earlier in the year. Initially appointed for one year, Dr Dalton will work with the UM’s Low Dimensional Materials group, contributing to research on functional applications of carbon nano-structures such as carbon nanotubes and graphene.

"I believe this will be a great opportunity to get a different perspective on my field of research through collaboration with academics from around the world."

Dr Alan Dalton

The Academic Icon programme enables internationally established and prolific researchers to work closely with the academic staff of the University of Malaya to guide and nurture high impact research and publish in top-tier journals.

The Academic Icon Program looks for the top scientists in various fields of research. Typically, Academic Icons are identified as those with an H-Index (an index that measures the productivity and impact of scientists’ work) of 30 or more, along with more than 100 publications and 1,000 citations, and an international standing in their field. Dr Dalton has an H-index of 37 and a citation count of over 6,400 (sourced from Google Scholar).

Dr Dalton says, “I am delighted to have been made an Academic Icon and a visiting Professor and look forward to a close collaboration with academics and students at the University of Malaya. I believe this will be a great opportunity to get a different perspective on my field of research through collaboration with academics from around the world, bringing together our collective expertise for high impact research projects.”

Having joined the University of Surrey in 2004, Dr Dalton leads the University’s Nanostructured Materials Group which focuses on understanding the fundamental structure-property relationships of materials containing one- and two-dimensional structures such as carbon nanotubes, graphene and other layered nanomaterials. One of his particular areas of interest is developing viable applications for nano-structured organic composites (whether mechanical, electrical or thermal). Dr Dalton has recently helped to develop an innovative method for growing embryonic stem cells using carbon nanotubes, as well as a medical sensor based on common elastic bands treated with graphene.

 

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