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Published: 01 June 2020

Supporting NHS Nightingale Hospital London and working in local hospital A&E departments

David Osbourne, Fleet Co-ordinator and University Driver has been supporting NHS Nightingale Hospital London and working in local hospital A&E departments.

David Osborne

As Covid-19 began to spread across the country, the UK Government and NHS England worked to introduce temporary large-scale NHS Nightingale Hospitals, to help support the anticipated increase in patients who would require critical care. The first of these hospitals opened in London’s ExCeL convention centre.

David Osborne joined the University’s Security team in 2012 and now works as the Fleet Co-ordinator and University Driver within our Estates and Facilities team. Volunteering has always played a significant part in David’s life, but we are incredibly proud to share his inspirational Covid-19 story and congratulate him for his incredible community work supporting NHS Nightingale Hospital London and local hospital A&E departments.

David explains: “Over 30 years ago I started volunteering in my spare time to help children with severe disabilities by looking after them, to give their parents some much-needed respite. Just being with them and seeing the joy on their faces was amazing, and I was happy to give some of my free time to help. 

“In 2015 I started volunteering for South East Ambulance and St John’s Ambulance as a First Responder and Advanced First Aider. As a trained volunteer I am dispatched by the ambulance service to attend 999 calls in my local area; I can reach patients faster, providing reassurance and performing lifesaving aid.” 

Having honed his professional skills and knowledge through his First Responder experience, David was able to give his time to supporting NHS Nightingale Hospital London and covering shifts in local hospital A&E departments when the pandemic hit.

David continues: “I completed additional training at NHS Nightingale and St Peter’s Hospital to enable me to support Covid-19 patients with recovery and discharge. This has been an overwhelming experience and one I will never forget. Soon it became apparent that the need to support local hospitals was greater than the Nightingale, so now I dedicate my time to two shifts a week working in A&E departments. These patients are alone, missing friends and family, so as well as medical tasks like replacing dressings, I’m also there to hold their hand, and to talk and reassure them.”

We would like to congratulate David for his courage and selfless dedication to caring for our community’s most vulnerable patients at such a challenging time, as well as years of commitment to helping those in need.

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