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Dr Cheryl Isherwood


Research Fellow
+44 (0)1483 689705
19 AY 02

Academic and research departments

School of Biosciences and Medicine.

My publications

Publications

Bonmati-Carrion MA, Hild K, Isherwood C, Sweeney SJ, Revell VL, Skene DJ, Rol MA, Madrid JA (2016) Relationship between Human Pupillary Light Reflex and Circadian System Status, PLoS One11(9)e0162476 Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs), whose photopigment melanopsin has a peak of sensitivity in the short wavelength range of the spectrum, constitute a common light input pathway to the olivary pretectal nucleus (OPN), the pupillary light reflex (PLR) regulatory centre, and to the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), the major pacemaker of the circadian system. Thus, evaluating PLR under short wavelength light (»max 500 nm) and creating an integrated PLR parameter, as a possible tool to indirectly assess the status of the circadian system, becomes of interest. Nine monochromatic, photon-matched light stimuli (300 s), in 10 nm increments from »max 420 to 500 nm were administered to 15 healthy young participants (8 females), analyzing: i) the PLR; ii) wrist temperature (WT) and motor activity rhythms (WA), iii) light exposure (L) pattern and iv) diurnal preference (Horne- Östberg), sleep quality (Pittsburgh) and daytime sleepiness (Epworth). Linear correlations between the different PLR parameters and circadian status index obtained from WT, WA and L recordings and scores from questionnaires were calculated. In summary, we found markers of robust circadian rhythms, namely high stability, reduced fragmentation, high amplitude, phase advance and low internal desynchronization, were correlated with a reduced PLR to 460?490 nm wavelengths. Integrated circadian (CSI) and PLR (cp-PLR) parameters are proposed, that also showed an inverse correlation. These results demonstrate, for the first time, the existence of a close relationship between the circadian system robustness and the pupillary reflex response, two non-visual functions primarily under melanopsin-ipRGC input.
Tiuganji Natalia M., Nehme Patricia, Marqueze Elaine C., Isherwood Cheryl M., Martins Andressa J., Vasconcelos Suleima, Cipolla-Neto José, Lowden Arne, Skene Debra J., Moreno Claudia R. C. (2020) Eating Behavior (Duration, Content, and Timing) Among Workers Living under Different Levels of Urbanization,Nutrients12(2)375 MDPI
Urbanization has contributed to extended wakefulness, which may in turn be associated with eating over a longer period. Here, we present a field study conducted in four groups with different work hours and places of living in order to investigate eating behavior (duration, content, and timing). Anthropometric measures were taken from the participants (rural (n = 22); town (n = 19); city-day workers (n = 11); city-night workers (n = 14)). In addition, a sociodemographic questionnaire was self-answered and 24-h food recalls were applied for three days. The 24-h food recalls revealed that fat intake varied according to the groups, with the highest consumption by the city-day workers. By contrast, city-day workers had the lowest intake of carbohydrate, whereas the rural group had the highest. In general, all groups had some degree of inadequacy in food consumption. Eating duration was negatively correlated with total energy intake, fat, and protein consumption in the rural and town groups. There was a positive correlation between body mass index and eating duration in both city groups. The rural group had the earliest start time of eating, and this was associated with a lower body mass index. This study suggested that food content and timing, as well as eating duration, differed according to place of living, which in turn may be linked to lifestyle.
Martins Andressa J., Isherwood Cheryl M., Vasconcelos Suleima P., Lowden Arne, Skene Debra J., Moreno Claudia R.C. (2020) The effect of urbanization on sleep, sleep/wake routine, and metabolic health of residents in the Amazon region of Brazil,Chronobiology Internationalpp. 1-9 International Society for Chronobiology
Studying communities with different levels of urbanization may further the understanding of risk factors underlying metabolic diseases. The present study is unique by comprising detailed assessment of sleep and activity, biological rhythms, and metabolic factors of men from the same geographical location and place of birth that reside in different, rural vs. town, stages of urbanization. Sleep patterns, activity, and metabolic indicators in two groups (rural, n = 22 and town/urban, n = 20) of men residing in an Amazonian community (Xapuri, Acre, Brazil) were compared. Sociodemographic, anthropometric, and metabolic variables ? fasting glucose, insulin resistance, triglycerides, total HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and VLDL cholesterol ? were assessed. Sleep patterns, light exposure, and physical activity levels were additionally assessed by actigraphy, plus daily activities were recorded in diaries for 10 days. Town/urban dwellers were found to have significantly higher body weight, fasting glucose, insulin levels, and insulin resistance than rural dwellers, whereas triglycerides levels were similar. Town/Urban dwellers had shorter sleep duration (p < .01) and later sleep onset and offset times (p = .01). Our findings show an association between stage of urbanization and presence of risk factors for metabolic disorders, such as overweight, insulin resistance, increased glucose levels, short sleep duration, and less natural light exposure during work times.