Professor Jane Hemsley-Brown


Professorial Fellow in Marketing
PhD (Soton) . MA (Soton) . DipMan (Soton) . BEd (IoE London)
Office hours - email to arrange a digital alternative

Academic and research departments

Department of Marketing and Retail Management.

Biography

Areas of specialism

Marketing

University roles and responsibilities

  • Head of Department of Marketing & Retail Management (interim)
  • Research Impact Officer for the Department of Marketing and Retail Management

My qualifications

1996
PhD in Marketing (consumer behaviour and choice)
University of Southampton (UK)
1992
Masters Degree (MA) in Management
University of Southampton (UK)
Undergraduate Degree in Education Theory and Practice (BEd Hons) (with Art & Design)
Institute of Education, University of London (UK)

Previous roles

2007 - 2011
Head of the Division of Business
School of Management University of Surrey
2013 - 2014
Deputy Head of School
Surrey Business School
2011 - 2016
Associate Dean (International)
Faculty of Business, Economics & Law

Research

Research interests

Research projects

Supervision

Completed postgraduate research projects I have supervised

Completed postgraduate research projects I have supervised

My teaching

My publications

Publications

Oplatka I, Foskett N, Hemsley-Brown J (2002) Educational marketisation and the head's psychological well-being: A speculative conceptualisation, BRITISH JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL STUDIES 50 (4) pp. 419-441 BLACKWELL PUBL LTD
Hemsley-Brown J (2013) It?s All About Grades: getting into a top university in the UK, American Marketing Association Winter Educator?s Conference Proceedings
Hemsley-Brown J, Hall M (2002) An Evaluation of the Information Classification System Pilots, NFER
Hemsley-Brown J (2012) Green universities and student choice?, Academy of Marketing Conference Proceedings
Hemsley-Brown J (2005) A Partnership Approach to Using Research: the role of the LEA, Management in Education 18 (5) pp. 17-20
Hemsley-Brown J, Oplatka I (2015) University choice: What do we know, what don?t we know and what do we still need to find out?, International Journal of Educational Management 29 (3) pp. 254-274
© Emerald Group Publishing Limited.Purpose-The purpose of this paper is to systematically document, scrutinise and critically analyse the current research literature on higher education choice to: Establish the scope of the studies; map the factors associated with choice; identify the key strengths and weaknesses in the research literature; critically analyse the extant research and make recommendations for further research in this field. Design/methodology/approach-The authors conducted extensive searches of relevant and education and management databases. The search is limited to publications between 1992 and 2013 and is intended to cover national and international research. The review is based on 75 papers which focus on institutional choice, assembled on an Excel database (45 surveys, 13 secondary data studies, one experimental study, two longitudinal studies, 11 qualitative studies and three studies that use both qualitative and quantitative techniques). Findings-Results are presented under thematic headings which emerged from the analysis: First, demographics and academic factors; second, factors which relate to the institution: Quality, outcomes and benefits, facilities, and characteristics of institutions. Finally factors which affect both the institution and the students: Price and price sensitivity, information and information sources, and travel and geographical factors are considered. Originality/value-Comprehensive analysis of prior research in the field of institutional choice is long overdue. Theoretical models for future research are presented as a result of the findings.
Hemsley-Brown J, Foskett NH (2001) Model Consumers? A model of choice and decision-making in educational markets,
Foskett N, Hemsley-Brown JV (1997) Career perceptions and decision making among young people in schools and colleges, Heist Publications
Hemsley-Brown J, Oplatka I (2013) International Research on Higher Education Choice: major findings, practical insights and future direction, American Educational Research Association Conference Proceedings
Hemsley-Brown J, Melewar T, Nguyen B, Wilson E (2016) Exploring brand identity, meaning, image, and reputation (BIMIR) in higher education: A special section, Journal of Business Research 69 (8) pp. 3019-3022 Elsevier
Due to the increasingly competitive landscape in the international higher education marketplace, colleges and universities have much to gain from the benefits of successful branding. In the commercial realm, the knowledge base on branding topics is extensive; in the realmof non-profit higher education institutions, however, more research is needed. As higher education institutions strive to develop distinctive identities, deeper understanding about topics such as brand identity, meaning, image, and reputation will enable brand owners to communicate more effectively with stakeholders including faculty, students, alumni, employers, and others. The articles in this special section describe research using a variety of qualitative (e.g., case study, fuzzy set analysis, metaphor analysis) and quantitative methods (e.g., cross-sectional surveys with data subjected to regression or structural equation modeling) utilizing primary and secondary data Scholarly contributions include new frameworks and perspectives to strengthen brand architecture of higher education institutions in the international marketplace. Practitioner readers may gain new insights for effective brand building in their own higher education institution.
Oplatka I, Hemsley-Brown J (2007) The incorporation of market orientation in the school culture: An essential aspect of school marketing, International Journal of Educational Management 21 (4) pp. 292-305 Emerald
Purpose:

The paper presents the major features of market orientation (MO) and its benefits for schools, suggests an inventory to measure the degree of MO in a school, and provides strategies to incorporate elements of MO into the school culture.

Approach:

An instructional, technical approach which is based on empirical literature both from business and service marketing and from the emergent research on educational marketing is taken in this article.

Content:

The paper analyzes the implications of MO for the management of school-environment relations, and provides an inventory to measure the degree of MO in individual schools. In addition, a stage by stage approach to incorporating MO into the school culture is broadly discussed, with a focus on the principal's key role in this process.

Practical implications:

The paper concludes by suggesting some implications for future research on MO in schools and other educational institutions and highlights the significance of MO for our understanding of school marketing in the era of competition and choice.

Originality/value of paper:

As MO frequently underpins the development and implementation of successful organization-environment relationships, the current paper is a first attempt to help principals and administrators incorporate MO into their school, thereby capitalizing on the great advantages of market-oriented organizational cultures.

Hemsley-Brown J, Foskett NH (2007) The Informed Consumer? Mapping student-consumer behaviour in Higher Education Markets,
Hemsley-Brown J, Foskett NH (1998) The Marketisation of the Careers Service, CREM/Heist Publications
Hemsley-Brown J (2006) Closing the research-practice gap: leadership as a key success factor in facilitating effective use of research findings,
Hemsley-Brown Jane, Sharp C (2003) The use of research to improve professional practice: a systematic review of the literature, OXFORD REV EDUC 29 (4) pp. 449-470 Taylor and Francis
In a keynote address to the Teacher Training Agency Annual Conference, Professor David Hargreaves suggested that teaching could become an evidence-based profession if educational researchers were made more accountable to teachers. This systematic literature review set out to explore: how teachers use research; which features of research encourage teachers to use research findings in their own practice; whether medical practitioners make greater use of research findings than teachers; and approaches to dissemination. Two key ideas emerge from this review. First, there appear to be common barriers to research use in both medicine and in education. Findings suggest that there is a need to create a culture in the public sector which supports and values research. There are, however, a number of factors, which appear to be more specific to the education field. Key differences in the way that research knowledge is constructed in the social sciences has led to researchers being challenged about their findings, particularly in relation to the context, generalisability and validity of the research. For these reasons the development of communication networks, links between researchers and practitioners, and greater involvement of practitioners in the research process, have emerged as strategies for improving research impact.
Oplatka I, Hemsley-Brown J (2012) Forms of market orientation among primary and secondary schoolteachers in Israel, In: Hemsley-Brown J, Oplatka I (eds.), The Management and Leadership of Educational Marketing: Research, practice and applications 9 Emerald Group Publishing
This book presents the works of leading scholars and researchers in the field of educational marketing who handle issues of student retention; trust; building relationships with parents, curriculum marketing, strategic marketing, and market ...
Hemsley-Brown J, Oplatka I, Foskett N (2002) Educational marketisation and the headteacher?s psychological well-being: a theoretical conceptualisation, British Journal of Educational Studies 50 (4) pp. 419-441
Hemsley-Brown J (2004) Partnerships and Collaborative Networks: developing a culture that supports and values management learning,
Hemsley-Brown J (1997) Double Disadvantage: A move towards convergent funding in Further Education, Management in Education 11 (4) pp. 12-13
Hemsley-Brown J (2011) Market Heal Thyself: the challenges of a free marketing in higher education, Journal of Marketing for Higher Education 21 (2) pp. 115-132 Taylor and Francis
The market is now accepted as an organizing principle of the world economy and is gradually replacing a number of political extremes ranging from totalitarianism to communism. The market continues to be viewed as way of addressing a wide range of social, industrial and economic issues: improving economic efficiency; greater value for money; enhancing innovation: a more cost effective way of achieving goals; increasing quality and the ability to compete more effectively internationally. These are just a few of the expectations of effective markets, but can the market be expected to compensate for its own shortcomings? Notwithstanding the continuing and emerging downsides to markets worldwide such as the failure of financial and housing markets, the mechanism continues to be viewed as a panacea for economic, social and political challenges in the delivery of education ? even to the point of being viewed as the solution to its own failings. I will begin with a brief introduction to the launch and development of market principles and market mechanisms in higher education, and trace the challenges of markets and marketisation brought about by simultaneous internationalization. Then, I raise questions about the operation of a free market in education as it is poised to become the overriding mechanism for the allocation of resources worldwide. I explore some of the potential damage the market can inflict on higher education, and raise concerns that the achievement of some of the fundamental and core values of higher education are in conflict with the market ? including evidence that markets are known to increase social polarization and reduce equality of access.
Hemsley-Brown J, Foskett N (1999) Gambling in the Careers Lottery: a consumer approach to career choice?, of Vocational Education and Training 51 (3) pp. 421-435
Hemsley-Brown J, Foskett NH (2002) Patterns of Choice: a model of choice and decision-making, Careers Research and Development, the NIAEC Journal (6)
Hemsley-Brown J (2000) Factors Affecting Post-16 Choices made by young people attending Central London secondary schools, CREM Publication
Lowrie A, Hemsley-Brown J (2011) This thing called marketisation, Journal of Marketing Management 27 (11-12) pp. 1081-1086 Taylor & Francis
Marketing and marketisation are not the same. However, it is not a simple task to disentangle one from the other. At one end of the distribution of meaning, marketing may be taken to be about the provision of information to help people make decisions, while at the other end of this distribution, marketisation challenges stakeholders with radical change encompassing issues of power, funding, labour, markets, and complexity. Nor is this a comprehensive list (see, e.g., Hemsley-Brown & Oplatka, 2006). Indeed, the idea of a definitive list is misleading. Meanings and lists tend to chop and change according to the particular perspective slicing the dialogue.While it is difficult to get an intellectual handle on what is happening with regard to marketing higher education ? never mind what to do about it ? the reader might like to think that that is rather the point: the complexity keeps the stakeholder guessing at what is difficult, if not impossible, to predict, and so this keeps us on our academic toes. Nevertheless, there are three very important characteristics evident in the literature to describe the situation and help us to develop an intellectual understanding of marketisation: (1) higher education is characterised by plurality; (2) it is competitive and likely to get even more competitive; and (3) it is rife with contestation. More than anything else in our research into marketing and the marketisation of higher education, we need analytical concepts to deal with these highly prominent yet not all-embracing characteristics. As the complexity and diversity of the literature in the subject area suggests, this is not going to come from a single disciplinary source. With regard to these characteristics, it is not simply a question of a variety of institutions of higher education competing, but these varied institutions are occupied by academics with competing theories. So institutional plurality and intellectual plurality add to the competitive fuel. Burning themes arising from these characteristics set within academic contestation are: increasing complexity, the rise of consumerism, rankings, the promotion of relevance, and identity. With regard to the second characteristic, it is irrelevant whether you like or approve or not; competition will define higher education and its being in the world and where that being is placed. Higher education?s identity and how stakeholders identify with it will alter radically. Indeed, it is already inaccurate to speak of the identity of higher education rather than identities. In consideration of the third set of characteristics, none of these goes unchallenged. Consensus is a long way off. The way forward is paved with many possibilities and potential directions. The plurality and competitive characteristics have multiple implications that work their way through how we approach marketing for higher education, understand it, and then deal with it. The articles in this special issue are just some of the research outcomes that link the major themes emanating from the characteristics. It would be impossible, of course, to cover all these themes in one special issue. Nevertheless,the articles in this special edition of the Journal of Marketing Management illustrate how marketing for higher education research is intricately bound up with (a) the characteristics and (b) the themes, and (c) how researchers break these themes down into manageable research topics such as marketing strategy, services marketing, consumer behaviour, and so on.
Hemsley-Brown J (2007) Market Orientation in HE institutions: development of a pilot instrument,
Hemsley-Brown J, Humphreys J (1996) The impact of the EN conversion programme on the NHS nursing workforce., Health Manpow Manage 22 (3) pp. 27-30
States that the number of enrolled nurse conversions completed during the last ten years has had a significant impact on the number of registered nurses (RNs) available for employment in the National Health Service (NHS), and the contribution made by the enrolled nurse conversion course programme to the NHS workforce may have delayed the impact of the "demographic time bomb" on nursing recruitment. Emphasizes that the winding down of the conversion programme, and a fall in the number of RNs employed in the NHS, combined with a decline in entries to preregistration (initial) training, could signal the beginning of the long-awaited crisis facing the nursing profession.
Hemsley-Brown J (2005) Research Utilisation: individual challenge or organisational transformation?,
Hemsley-Brown J, Yaakop A, Gilbert D (2010) Attitudes towards advertising: Malaysians vs non-Malaysians,
Hemsley-Brown J (2006) Universities in a competitive global marketplace: a systematic review of the literature on higher education marketing, International Journal of Public Sector Management 19 (4) pp. 316-338
Purpose - The purpose of this systematic review was to explore the nature of the marketing of higher education (HE) and universities in an international context. The objectives of the review were to: systematically collect, document, scrutinise and critically analyse the current research literature on supply-side higher education marketing; establish the scope of higher education marketing; identify gaps in the research literature; and make recommendations for further research in this field. Design/methodology/approach - The approach for this study entailed extensive searches of relevant business management and education databases. The intention was to ensure that, as far as possible, all literature in the field was identified - while keeping the focus on literature of greatest pertinence to the research questions. Findings - The paper finds that potential benefits of applying marketing theories and concepts that have been effective in the business world are gradually being recognised by researchers in the field of HE marketing. However, the literature on HE marketing is incoherent, even inchoate, and lacks theoretical models that reflect upon the particular context of HE and the nature of their services. Research limitations/implications - The research field of HE marketing is still at a relatively pioneer stage with much research still to be carried out both from a problem identification and strategic erspective. Originality/value - Despite the substantial literature on the marketisation of HE and consumer behaviour, scholarship to provide evidence of the marketing strategies that have been implemented by HE institutions on the supply-side remains limited, and this is relatively uncharted territory. This paper reviews the literature in the field, focusing on marketing strategies in the rapidly developing HE international market. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.
Kolsaker A, Hemsley-Brown J, Lewis B (2009) Which University: an empirical study of applicants? choice criteria,
Hemsley-Brown J (2004) Making it happen: facilitating research utilisation in the public sector,
Foskett NH, Hemsley-Brown J (1999) Teachers and Careers Education, In: Teachers? Awareness of Careers Outside Teaching CREM Publications
Hemsley-Brown J, Foskett NH (1999) Teachers? Worlds, Children?s Worlds - Teachers? influence on Young People?s Perceptions of the Labour Market,
Oplatka I, Hemsley-Brown J (2012) Research on School Marketing, current issues and future directions, an updated version, In: Hemsley-Brown J, Oplatka I (eds.), The Management and Leadership of Educational Marketing Emerald Group Publishing
This review provides a synthesis of the scholarship that has sought to expand understanding of educational marketing practice in schools. The following research questions guided this review: (1) what are the common themes and characteristics that emerge from research about marketing in schools? (2) What remains underdeveloped in the characterization of the school marketing and what are the topics for future research? Based on 25 studies identified as pertinent for the current review the topics of: marketing perceptions, marketing planning, marketing strategies and promotion are discussed. The paper concludes by providing an analysis of the limitations of the current research and discussing future directions for research on school marketing.
Hemsley-Brown J, Goonawardana S (2007) Brand Harmonisation in the International Higher Education Market, Journal of Business Research 60 (9) pp. 942-948 Elsevier
Universities today are increasingly competing for international students in response to trends in global student mobility, diminishing university funding and government-backed recruitment campaigns. This trend has driven the need for universities to focus on clearly articulating and developing their brand, and developing harmony within the brand architecture. This case study of one University focuses on brand architecture and found evidence of a move towards corporatization, based on the pressure for UK universities to align with the notion of a British Education, promoted through the British Council. However, the process of brand harmonization raises concerns about the potential impact on the marketing positioning and the autonomy of faculties and schools. The challenge seems to be to work on brand-building within the University with an understanding of two-way communication within the brand architecture: universities should acknowledge schools? and faculties? contributions to the identity of the brand.
Hemsley-Brown J (1997) Gaining a reputation for excellence, Why promoting your school can make a difference, Education Marketing (12) pp. 24-25
Hemsley-Brown J (2002) Managing retention under the new skills agenda, Research in Post Compulsory Education 7 (3) pp. 233-246
Nguyen B, Yu X, Melewar T, Hemsley-Brown J (2016) Brand ambidexterity and commitment in higher education: An exploratory study, Journal of Business Research 69 (8) pp. 3105-3112 Elsevier
The study investigates a university's brand ambidexterity strategy and its effects on brand image, reputation, and commitment in higher education. A research model integrates the determinants of university-specific brand performance and proposes that commitment toward a particular university is influenced by (a) brand ambidexterity, that is, exploratory and exploitative orientations, and (b) student level responses, these being the students' perceptions with brand image and reputation leading to increased commitment with the university. Findings suggest that when students choose to commit for the study of a postgraduate degree, a variety of factors influence their decision, of which the brand performance and brand image constructs play major roles; interestingly, brand reputation is less important. The framework helps university managers in designing appropriate strategies to influence students' commitment toward the university to, for example, continue their postgraduate studies. Implications exist for broader brand management and customer management approaches that include up and cross-selling schemes.
Hemsley-Brown J, Foskett NH (1999) Invisibility, Perceptions and Image - Mapping The Career Choice Landscape, Research in Post Compulsory Education 4 (3) pp. 233-248
Keynote Presentation
Hemsley-Brown J, Foskett NH (2001) High hopes: factors affecting choices of education and training pathways,
Hemsley-Brown J, Foskett NH (2001) Early leavers on Modern Apprenticeships and National Traineeships, CREM Publications
Foskett NH, Hemsley-Brown J (1998) Perceptions of Nursing as a Career, Department of Health
Oplatka I, Hemsley-Brown J, Foskett NH (2002) The voice of teachers in marketing their school: Personal perspectives in competitive environments, School Leadership and Management 22 (2) pp. 177-196
At the end of a decade of enhanced marketisation in schools, this article considers the subjective meanings attached to educational marketing by school teachers and the ways they construct and interpret teachers' 'idealised' and 'actual' involvement and contribution to school marketing. Through semi-structured interviews with 12 secondary school teachers from the south of England, the study revealed teachers' perceptions of and attitudes towards competition, marketing and education, their awareness of the marketing activities of their schools, the teachers' role in marketing the school and the perceived impact of the market upon teachers' well being. The results show that there is no coherent, organised view of education marketing among teachers in the study but rather that there are a number of inchoate voices amongst teachers concerning their role in school marketing. Broadly, two voices are revealed that reflect a cognitive dissonance which may exist among school teachers in the era of marketisation. This dissonance may stem from teachers' ideology-based difficulty in perceiving marketing as part of school life, while at the same time, they are aware of its importance to the school's success.
Hemsley-Brown J (2000) An Analysis of perceptions of medicine as a career, Pilot Study, CREM Publications
Hemsley-Brown J, Oplatka I (2015) Higher Education Consumer Choice, Palgrave Macmillan
Focusing on personal factors that influence consumer choice, group aspects of consumer behaviour such as cultural and ethnic differences, as well as theoretical and research models, this book is designed to stimulate new debate and ...
Wilson R, Hemsley-Brown J, Easton C, Sharp C (2003) Using Research for School Improvement: The LEA?s Role, NFER
Foskett N, Hemsley-Brown J (2001) Choosing Futures: Young people?s decision-making in education, training and careers markets, Routledge
Education is becoming more competitive - choice in education is now a key issue. This book will help parents, schools, colleges, universities and policy makers understand how education and training markets work.
Yaakop A, Hemsley-Brown J, Gilbert D (2011) Attitudes towards advertising: Malaysians vs Non-Malaysians, Asian Journal of Business and Management Sciences 1 (2) pp. 77-94 Society for Business Research Promotion
Hemsley-Brown J (1994) Marketing the School?s Sixth Form, Inside Education Marketing 1 (3) pp. 2-3
Hemsley-Brown J, Goonawardana S (2006) The Importance of Brand Architecture in the International Higher Education Market,
Hemsley-Brown J (2003) Ten Golden Guidelines for Marketeers, Executive, Business News (Translated into Greek)
Hemsley-Brown J (2012) The Best Education in the World: reality, repetition or cliché? International students? reasons for choosing an English university, Studies in Higher Education 37 (8) pp. 1005-1022 Taylor and Francis
Universities and students collaborate in a shared language of excellence, quality and choice and become part of the same ?neo-liberal discourse of marketisation and commodification, and globalisation? (Sauntson and Morrish 2010 p.83) where each plays their part as provider and consumer in a highly competitive international area. Whilst there are an increasing number of studies focused on the use of the Internet and website use, there are still only very few papers on the use of websites in the context of Higher Education and university choice. This study uses a sample of 60 personal statements from online post-graduate applications submitted by overseas students. The extracts are coded for analysis and compared against the website information provided on university and British Council websites during the time period of the applications. Applicants used nouns, adjectives and phrases published on the British Council website and the website of their target university.
Foskett NH, Hemsley-Brown J (1997) Pupils? Knowledge and Awareness of Higher Education' Project, CREM University of Southampton
Hemsley-Brown J, Walmsley B (2007) E-Marketing the Arts: Electronic applications in Promoting the Performing Arts,
Hemsley-Brown J (1999) College Choice: Perceptions and Priorities, Educational Management and Administration 27 (1) pp. 85-98
Hemsley-Brown J, Humphreys J (1998) Opportunity or Obligation? participation in adult vocational training, Journal of Vocational Education and Training 50 (3) pp. 85-98
Hemsley-Brown J, Foskett NH (1998) The Marketisation of the Careers Service, CREM/Heist Publications
Hemsley-Brown J, Foskett NH (1999) Non-starters and drop-outs: Modern Apprenticeships in IT ? What?s going on?,
Oplatka I, Hemsley-Brown J (2012) The Management and Leadership of Educational Marketing, Emerald Group Publishing
This book presents the works of leading scholars and researchers in the field of educational marketing who handle issues of student retention; trust; building relationships with parents, curriculum marketing, strategic marketing, and market ...
Hemsley-Brown J, Foskett NH (1997) Career Horizons, Higher Education and Student-Decision-Making - ?Knowledge? of Higher Education Amongst Year 6, 8 and 10 Pupils,
Hemsley-Brown J (2003) Research utilisation: developing a learning culture,
Hemsley-Brown J (2004) Scrutinising Scrutiny: the impact of local government modernisation, Local Governance 29 (3) pp. 169-181
Hemsley-Brown J (2004) Facilitating research utilisation: a cross-sector review of research evidence, International Journal of Public Sector Management 17 (6) pp. 534-552
Lowrie A, Hemsley-Brown J (2010) Theory, curricula and ethics: Is it the 'time and being' for a radical approach?, Journal of Marketing for Higher Education 20 (2) pp. 167-173
Hemsley-Brown J (2004) Advertising: the importance of measuring impact, Executive, Business News (Translated into Greek)
Hemsley-Brown J (2015) Getting into a Russell Group university: high scores and private schooling, BRITISH EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH JOURNAL WILEY-BLACKWELL
Hemsley-Brown J (1997) Counting nurses: interpreting nursing workforce statistics., Health Manpow Manage 23 (4-5) pp. 159-166
Discusses the interpretation of nursing statistics, the problem of counting how many nurses there are in the workforce, and the need to be aware of how statistics are compiled when presenting numerical data to support arguments relating to nursing and the nursing workforce. Argues that NHS workforce statistics provide considerable evidence for claiming that there is a significant decline in the number of nursing staff doing the work of nursing in the NHS. Explains that although there was an increase in the number of qualified nurses working in the NHS throughout the 1980s (over a ten-year period the number of qualified nurses increased by 22 per cent), the increase in qualified nursing staff has not compensated for the loss of student learners in the workforce. Emphasizes that during the last three years for which figures are available, however, these gains have been wiped out, and the number of qualified nurses has declined to pre-Project 2000 levels.
Hemsley-Brown J, Oplatka I (2004) Research on school marketing: current issues and future directions, Journal of Educational Administration 42 (3) pp. 375-400
Hemsley-Brown J, Oplatka I (2010) The Globalization and Marketization of Higher Education: Some Insights from the Standpoint of Institutional Theory, In: Maringe F, Foskett N (eds.), Globalization and Internationalization in Higher Education (5) 5 Continuum Intl Pub Group
Aims: The chapter aims to challenge the basic premise underlying the processes of globalization and internationalization of HE (Higher Education) systems, and especially the consecutive marketization process, from the standpoint of the institutional theory of organization originating in sociology (Hall, 2001). Using institutional theory of organization as a theoretical framework for examining the theoretical essentials of these major processes currently in evidence in many HE systems may explain the barriers to diversity, responsiveness, and improvement ? all of which are assumed to be driven by the introduction of marketization policies in HE systems. Evidence: review, theoretical The aim of the book the chapter - contributes to providing a theoretical basis for understanding the concepts of globalisation and internationalisation in the context of HE. Summary of key ideas of the chapter: The process of globalization and internationalization of HE in many developed countries is accompanied by a process of marketization because universities have to compete for students and resources by adopting market-like ideologies and diversity policies (Edwards, 2004). Basically, marketization includes the adoption of customer-oriented attitudes, uncertainty and ambiguity, emphasises the importance of external relations, systems of quality assurance, inter-organizational competition, and marketing-led management. In this chapter, we critically reflect upon the marketization process of HE institutions, by using four basic concepts underlying the institutional theory of organization: conformity to institutional rules, isomorphism, decoupling, and normatively-based decision-making. Briefly, we develop several arguments by asking, (1) to what extent are HEIs changes fundamental and a natural consequence of the need to respond to globalization and internationalization fundamental, rather than just image development? (2) Can HEIs be genuinely responsive to international students? special needs/wants? (3) Can we expect high levels of diversity within universities following the recruitment of large numbers of international students? (4) To what extent are international students able to make choices based on clear and visible information about the university? The proposed chapter aims to challenge conventional wisdom in the emergent area of HE marketization and to come up with thought provoking theoretical ideas about the limitations of internationalization in HE systems. References Edwards, K. (2004). The university in Europe and the US. In R. King (ed.), The university in the global age. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 27-44.
Hemsley-Brown J (1998) A Winning Combination, The Partnership between schools, colleges and the Careers Service, Education Marketing (14) pp. 20-21
Hemsley-Brown J, Kolsaker A (2008) Higher Expectations, Unique insight in the student verdict on admissions, recruitment, marketing and fees, The Opinion Panel
Foskett NH, Hemsley-Brown J (1999) Perceptions of Modern Apprenticeships - the Wiltshire Study, CREM University of Southampton
Hemsley-Brown J, Humphreys (1997) Countdown to completion., Nurs Times 93 (11)
Hemsley-Brown J, Chan Poon M (2008) Function or Feeling?: Design of an instrument to measure International Students? Choice of British University,
Hemsley-Brown J, Foskett NH (1999) Communicating the Organisation, In: Lumby J, Foskett NH (eds.), External Relations Management in Schools and Colleges PCP/ Sage
Hemsley-Brown J, Yaakop A, Gilbert D (2009) Hierarchy-of-Effects (HoE) Models and Higher Education Advertising,
Oplatka I, Hemsley-Brown J (2012) Reflections on Management and Leadership of Education Marketing, Looking Toward the Future, In: Hemsley-Brown J, Oplatka I (eds.), The Management and Leadership of Educational Marketing: Research, practice and applications (12) 12 Emerald Group Publishing
This book presents the works of leading scholars and researchers in the field of educational marketing who handle issues of student retention; trust; building relationships with parents, curriculum marketing, strategic marketing, and market ...
Hemsley-Brown J (1999) The State and Colleges, In: Lumby J, Foskett NH (eds.), External Relations Management in Schools and Colleges PCP/ Sage
Hemsley-Brown J (1996) Decision making among 15-16 years olds in the post sixteen market place, Markets in Education: Policy, Process and Practice, Volume 2
Hemsley-Brown J, Lowrie A (2012) Being Green Doesn?t Rank with Universities or Students, Society for Marketing Advances Conference Proceedings
Hemsley-Brown J, Cunningham M, Morton R, Sharp C (2003) Education Decision-making under scrutiny: the impact of local government modernisation, NFER
Hemsley-Brown J, Sharp C (2002) The use of research by practitioners in education: has medicine got it cracked?,
Hemsley-Brown J (2003) Economic aspirations, cultural replication and social dilemmas ? interpreting parental choice of British private schools, In: Walford G (eds.), British private schools Routledge
This has led to an increasing interest in the realities of the private schools; and this book brings together the best of recently conducted research on the ...
Hemsley-Brown J, Foskett N (1999) Career desirability: young people's perceptions of nursing as a career, JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING 29 (6) pp. 1342-1350 WILEY-BLACKWELL
The majority of young people make a career choice without regard for salary, and base their decision on interest and enjoyment or a desire to help people. This paper examines students' perceptions of nursing as a career at a number of key stages in their education decision-making, and how this information influences their subsequent career decision either to choose or to reject nursing. Factors relating to image and status are also explored and some comparisons are made between nursing and young people's own choice of career, to highlight a number of significant issues. The findings indicate that although young people expressed admiration for the work of nurses, this was rarely matched by an envy of nurses, or a desire to become a nurse themselves.
Hemsley-Brown J (2005) Using research to support management decision making within the field of education, Management Decision 43 (5) pp. 691-705
Purpose - There has been much interest in evidence-informed decision making in education - identifying effective ways of increasing the use of research evidence to provide a basis for management decision making, in both the private and public sectors. However, in education, although there has been much speculation and discussion, there has been a paucity of recent empirical research evidence that provides insights into the characteristics, practice and mechanisms of successful research utilisation strategies. This study aimed to explore how research evidence was successfully disseminated and how the barriers to research use by head teachers (principals) were successfully addressed. The study was qualitative and exploratory in nature and aimed to identify examples of projects led by, and supported by, local education authorities (LEAs), that aimed to help education practitioners to access, engage with, and use the findings from published research and research carried out by themselves, and shared with others. Design/methodology/approach - This paper presents and discusses the findings from an empirical study conducted in eight local authorities in England and Wales. Findings - The research evidence suggests that to improve research use among managers in education, strategies should focus on facilitating communication networks, partnerships and links between researchers and practitioners, with the key long-term objective of developing a culture that supports and values the contribution that research can make to management decision making in education. Originality/value - Managers in local education authorities (LEAs) can help to build networks, develop partnerships between professionals locally, nationally and internationally, and also act as change agents in the dissemination and adoption of new ideas. However, the research focused on illustrative examples of research use - and further research is needed to evaluate the impact of using research for decision making in education. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.
Hemsley-Brown J, Foskett NH (1999) Choosing Futures, Young People?s Construction of Education and Training Pathways Beyond School,
Hemsley-Brown J, Yaakop A (2008) Review On Selected Hierarchy-Of-Effects (Hoe) Models And The Way Forward,
Alnawas I, Hemsley-Brown J (2018) The Differential Effect of Cognitive and Emotional Elements of Experience Quality on the Customer-Service Provider's Relationship, International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management Emerald Publishing Limited
Purpose ?

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to examine the differential effect of two cognitive
(i.e. product experience, outcome focussed) and two emotional experiences (i.e. surprise and immersion) on
customers? cognitive outcomes (i.e. satisfaction, trust and value), and customers? emotional outcomes
(i.e. passion, connection and affection); and second, to test the differential effect of customers? cognitive and
emotional outcomes on switching resistance loyalty (SRL).

Design/methodology/approach ?

Survey data were collected from 843 respondents using an online panel
in the UK. Structural equation modelling was employed to analyse the data (AMOS 18.0).

Findings ?

First, cognitive experiences had a more significant effect on customers? cognitive outcomes
compared to their effect on customers? emotional outcomes. Second, emotional experiences had a more
significant effect on customers? emotional outcomes compared to their effect on customers? cognitive
outcomes. Third, the impact of customers? emotional outcomes on SRL was not significantly higher compared
to that of customers? cognitive outcomes. Fourth, the indirect effect of cognitive experiences on SRL was
significantly higher, compared to that of emotional experiences.

Originality/value ?

The key contribution of this research stems from examining the differential effect of
cognitive and emotional experiences on different consumers? cognitive and emotional outcomes,
thus providing deeper insights into the nature of the relationship between such variables.

Hemsley-Brown J (2008) Using Evidence to Support Administrative Decisions, In: Hemsley-Brown J (eds.), Handbook on Data-Based Decision Making in Education pp. 272-285 Lawrence Erlbaum & Taylor and Francis
The gap between the researcher?s world and the practitioner?s world has long been recognised: research literature is generally not part of a practitioner?s library (Huberman, 1990). One of the effects of this is that actions by decision-makers and practitioners are unlikely to be informed by research, and dissemination of research information and knowledge is problematic (Hillage et al., 1998). The need for practitioners to utilize the findings from research as a basis for decision making is not just an issue for schools, but is a compelling idea for the workplace as a whole (Gruber & Niles, 1973; Weiss, 1979; Huberman, 1990; Davies & Nutley, 2002; Kelemen & Bansal, 2002; Walter et al., 2003a; Walter et al., 2003b; Sutton, 2004; Percy-Smith, 2005). Many studies have explored how and why new ideas and practices are adopted (Sturdy, 2004) in an attempt to discover how practitioners and managers could be encouraged to use research to support their decision-making (Hemsley-Brown, 2005) and to increase the performance of schools (Hemsley-Brown & Sharp, 2003). The increasing interest in utilizing research findings for improving schools and providing evidence for management decision making is an important response to the rapid pace of change, the availability of electronic data and the considerably pressure to improve increasingly complex organizations. Successful and continuous improvement depends less on who has the information and increasingly on those able to make the best use of that information (Moorman et al., 1992; Hemsley-Brown, 2005). However, much of the knowledge generated by research fails to impact on a practitioner audience and although some research focuses on facilitating the utilization of research, much research effort has been devoted to explaining and justifying the gaps ? the research-practice gap (Boostrom et al., 1993; Klein, 1995; Bero et al., 1998; Johnson, 2000; Huff & Huff, 2001; Kelemen & Bansal, 2002).
Hemsley-Brown J (2018) Higher Education Market Segmentation, In: Cheol Shin J, Teixeira P (eds.), International Encyclopedia of Higher Education Systems and Institutions Springer Netherlands
Hemsley-Brown J, Alnawas I (2016) Service Quality and Brand Loyalty: The Mediation Effect of Brand Passion, Brand Affection and Self-Brand Connection, International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management 28 (12) pp. 2771-2794 Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Purpose: The aim of this study is threefold: first, to examine the extent to which service quality (SQ) affects the three components of emotional brand attachment (EBA) (brand passion, brand affection and self-brand connection); second, to investigate the extent to which these three components influence brand loyalty; and third, to test the mediation effect of the components of EBA on the SQ-loyalty relationship. Design/Methodology/Approach: Survey data were collected from 355 respondents using an online panel in the UK. Smart PLS2.0 was employed to analyze the data. Findings: Three key findings emerge: first, compared to staff behavior, physical environment tends to have a stronger and more significant effect on the three elements of EBA. Second, brand passion and self-brand connection fully mediate the SQ-loyalty relationship, whereas brand affection partially mediates the same relationship. Finally, the SQ-EBA-loyalty relationship is significantly stronger for repeat visitors compared to first-time visitors. Originality: The findings offer new insights through examining the symbolic consumption and emotional aspects of a guest?s hotel experience as mediators to the SQ-loyalty relationship. The findings also add to the growing body of knowledge of the antecedents of EBA through identifying physical environment and staff behavior as key determinants of EBA. Practical Implications: Hotel brands need to design their facilities and décor, and develop guest experiences based on symbolic values and deep emotional aspects. Offering employees customer care training and adopting a consumer-centric, relational, and storytelling approach are particularly important in order to inspire and captivate hotels? customers, and to build and shape profound and enduring affective ties between the hotel brand and its customers.
Hemsley-Brown J, Oplatka I (2010) Market orientation in universities: A comparative study of two national higher education systems, International Journal of Educational Management 24 (3) pp. 204-220 Emerald
Purpose:

the reported study tested (1) whether there are significant differences between the two countries, in terms of perceptions of market orientation (MO) in higher education (HE), (2) which MO dimensions (student; competition; intra-functional) indicate more positive attitudes and whether the differences are significant; and (3) the reliability of the instrument for using a larger sample of respondents internationally.

Method:

A comparative (online) survey of 68 academics in England and Israel has been conducted during the academic year of 2007. The MO questionnaire used comprises 32 factor items rated on a six-point scale, categorised using three headings: market (student-customer) orientation; competitor orientation; and inter-functional coordination.

Findings:

Overall, academics in both countries indicated that their HE institution is oriented towards meeting students? needs and desires, and cares for students? well-being, teaching and learning. In addition, our respondents alluded to their contribution to internal marketing, i.e., to the promotion of their university through their own work tasks and performances.

Practical implications:

The meeting of student needs, and a student centred approach can be an institutional mission, as well as a government drives initiative imposed on universities through the introduction of a market.

Originality/value of paper:

As MO frequently underpins the development and implementation of successful organisation-environment relationships, the current paper is a first attempt to trace the contextual determinants of this orientation by comparing its frequencies and elements in two different HE system.

Hemsley-Brown J, Oplatka I (2005) Bridging the research-practice gap: Barriers and facilitators to research use among school principals from England and Israel, International Journal of Public Sector Management 18 (5) pp. 424-446 Emerald
When a professional practitioner is faced with making a decision about what to do in a particular situation, do they base that decision on findings from research? This paper reports on qualitative and quantitative research which examined school principals? perceptions of barriers to the use of research. To facilitate a comparison the study was conducted simultaneously in two countries: England and Israel using interviews, focus groups and the Barriers Scale survey instrument (Funk et al., 1991). The results of tests indicated that factors associated with the research itself, (e.g. relevance and access), were significant barriers to research use for principals from both countries (compared with factors associated with: the setting; the presentation of research; and the individual). The paper concludes that multiple strategies would be required to address a number of issues related to the dissemination of research and ways of addressing the gap between the aims of researchers, and the needs and expectations of practitioners.
Hemsley-Brown J (2005) Using Research to Support Management Decision-Making, Management Decision 43 (5) pp. 691-705 Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Purpose

There has been much interest in evidence?informed decision making in education ? identifying effective ways of increasing the use of research evidence to provide a basis for management decision making, in both the private and public sectors. However, in education, although there has been much speculation and discussion, there has been a paucity of recent empirical research evidence that provides insights into the characteristics, practice and mechanisms of successful research utilisation strategies. This study aimed to explore how research evidence was successfully disseminated and how the barriers to research use by head teachers (principals) were successfully addressed. The study was qualitative and exploratory in nature and aimed to identify examples of projects led by, and supported by, local education authorities (LEAs), that aimed to help education practitioners to access, engage with, and use the findings from published research and research carried out by themselves, and shared with others.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents and discusses the findings from an empirical study conducted in eight local authorities in England and Wales.

Findings

The research evidence suggests that to improve research use among managers in education, strategies should focus on facilitating communication networks, partnerships and links between researchers and practitioners, with the key long?term objective of developing a culture that supports and values the contribution that research can make to management decision making in education.

Originality/value

Managers in local education authorities (LEAs) can help to build networks, develop partnerships between professionals locally, nationally and internationally, and also act as change agents in the dissemination and adoption of new ideas. However, the research focused on illustrative examples of research use ? and further research is needed to evaluate the impact of using research for decision making in education.

When a company identifies an unavoidable service failure, they do not always inform customers or initiate activities to minimise the negative effects. Thus, customers are exposed to service failures and companies are faced with the issue of recovering. This thesis studies the effect of pre-failure service recovery on customer satisfaction. Also, the joint effect of pre-failure recovery and criticality on customer satisfaction is examined.
A critical review of the literature on service failure and recovery is presented drawing upon the underlying theories of disconfirmation of expectations theory, justice theory, and prospect theory. From this, a conceptual model and hypotheses have been developed and put forward. A non-probability quota sample is employed. Using a 2x2x2 scenario based experimental design, T-Tests and 2-way between-groups analysis of variance are used.
Results show pre-failure recovery can aid the service recovery process and heighten customer satisfaction in the face of inevitable unavoidable service failure. This research adds a new step in the service recovery process extending the literature on service failure, service recovery, and criticality.
The implications of this research are that through using pre-failure service recovery, the damage of an inevitable unavoidable service failure can be minimised resulting in higher satisfaction. Consumers appreciate honesty and upfront service providers regardless of whether they are in a time critical situation or not. A practical implication is that before considering compensation, service providers could use pre-failure recovery as this may be enough for recovery (and if not then it will make recovery easier and the provider could offer less compensation). This could save providers money.
Future studies could consider other forms of pre-failure recovery and their effect on satisfaction. The present study could be extended into other service sectors. Furthermore, researchers could examine pre-information and post-information to compare the two and their effects on satisfaction.
Hemsley-Brown J (2014) Mission Group Segments in the UK University Market, American Marketing Association Educators? Conference Proceedings
Hemsley-brown, Jane (2013) The Management and Leadership of Educational Marketing: Research, practice and applications, 15 Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Hemsley-Brown J (2015) Getting into a Russell Group university: high scores and private schooling, British Educational Research Journal 41 (3) pp. 398-422 Wiley
Hemsley-Brown J, Lowrie A (2013) Who Cares about Universities Going Green?, American Marketing Association Summer Educator?s Conference Proceedings
Lowrie A, Hemsley-Brown Jane (2012) The Market Signalling Problem of Higher Education, Winter Educator?s Conference Proceedings
Nguyen B, Hemsley-Brown J, Melewar T (2016) Branding in Higher Education, In: Dall'Olmo Riley F, Singh J, Blankson C (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Contemporary Brand Management Routledge
Hemsley-Brown J (2013) Destiny or discrimination? Choosing a Russell group university, Academy of Marketing Conference Proceedings
Hemsley-Brown J, Oplatka I (2015) University Choice: what do we know, what don?t we know and what do we still need to find out?, International Journal of Educational Management 29 (3) pp. 254-274 Emerald
Hemsley-Brown J (2011) Market heal thyself: the challenges of a free market in higher education, Journal of Marketing for Higher Education 21 (2) pp. 115-132 Taylor and Francis
Hemsley-Brown J (2017) UK undergraduates? usage of marketing and media communications: market segments by mission group, CMC 2017 Proceedings University of Zaragoza, Faculty of Economics and Business Zaragoza, Spain
The objective of this study is to develop a conceptual model that includes suitable theories and predictors for understanding and circumscribing governance choice and its drivers for marketing-process sourcing in multinational enterprises, and to test this model and make assumptions about how such processes are possibly governed by taking fundamental economic decision making theories into account The literature review has shown that there is currently very minimal understanding of how activities and processes in marketing can be sourced and geographically relocated. This study thus contributes to the body of knowledge that deals with the sourcing and allocation of marketing processes by developing a clear picture of what marketing processes are and how they can be identified and contextualised in multinational enterprises.
Based on the literature review, the conceptual model suggests how new institutional economics interplays with marketing-process sourcing. The model applies the transaction-cost theory as well as the resource-based theory in order to synthesise practice-oriented process characteristics, process-specific factors and non-transactional aspects with regard to strategic partnership and contracting.
The study is designed as a sequential-explanatory research project using mixed methods in accordance with Ulrich. Furthermore, a cluster sampling among NAICS industry categories was also carried out. Consequently, this study performs practical research in business economics in two steps: the acquisition and the interpretation of problem-relevant empirical-scientific theories and scientific knowledge using an online questionnaire and, in addition, the use and testing of the explanations and statements in managerial and practical contexts through expert interviews.
The regression analyses of the quantitatively collected data has shown that the process governance of pricing, branding, communication, supply chain management, customer management, marketing controlling and marketing management cannot be explained through transaction-cost economics, whereas significant results for market research, product development and direct marketing are exhibited by the theory. Furthermore, this research has shown highly significant correlations between contractual and market governance of marketing processes and strategic-specific variables derived from resource-based theory.
The research has three primary limitations. Firstly, the qualitative research part of the mixed-method research could not be performed comprehensively. The discussions of the experts were limited to five interviews carried out in order to confirm the research findings. However, from a qualitative exploratory perspective the interviews enrich the results of the quantitative data-collection phase. Secondly, design limitation may arise from the sampling strategy, since key informant conflicts occur. Thirdly, technological uncertainty of product development, branding and customer management only possess moderate reliability coefficients and have to be treated with caution.
Alnawas Ibrahim, Hemsley-Brown Jane (2019) Examining the key Dimensions of Customer Experience Quality in the Hotel Industry, Journal of Hospitality Marketing & Management Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
Hemsley-brown, Jane (2019) Strategic Brand Management in Higher Education, Routledge

University branding has increased substantially, due to demands on universities to enroll greater numbers of students, rising tuition fees, the proliferation of courses, the growing "internationalization" of universities, financial pressures and reliance on income from foreign students. As higher education continues to grow, increased competition places more pressure on institutions to market their programs. Technological, social, and economic changes have necessitated a customer-oriented marketing system, and a focus on developing the university brand.

This book is unique in providing a composite overview of strategy, planning and measurement informed by ground-breaking research and the experiences of academics. It combines theoretical and methodological aspects of branding with the views of leading exponents of branding in different contexts and across a range of higher education institutions. Expert contributors from research and practice provide relevant and varying perspectives allowing readers to access information on international trends, theory and practices about branding in higher education.

Readers are exposed to the critical elements of strategic brand management, gain insights into the planning process of higher education branding and gain a solid understanding of the emerging research area of branding concepts in higher education. Advanced students, and researchers will find this book a unique resource, and it will also be of interest to brand practitioners in both education and public sector markets.

Alnawas Ibrahim, Hemsley-Brown Jane (2019) Market orientation and hotel performance: investigating the role of high-order marketing capabilities, International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management Emerald

Purpose

Using the resource-based view (RBV), the purpose of this paper is to examine the potential mediation effect of customer relationship management capability, branding capability and service innovation capability on the established link between market orientation (MO) and hotel performance. It further investigates the complementarity between these capabilities in relation to hotel performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey data were collected from 216 UK hotels. AMOS 23 was used to analyse the research data.

Findings

The link between MO and hotel performance appears to be indirect via customer relationship capability, branding capability and service innovation capability. The three capabilities also appear to play different complementary roles when affecting hotel performance.

Practical implications

The current study offers hotel managers a ranking of the contribution of individual capabilities to hotel performance. It also helps them to make better investment decisions in developing the right capability combinations to enhance their hotel performance.

Originality/value

The research is based on integrating MO and RBV into a single framework to gain a deeper understanding of the relationship between MO and high-order marketing capabilities and how these factors shape hotel performance.

Oplatka Izhar, Hemsley-Brown Jane (2020) A systematic and updated review of the literature on higher education marketing 2005-2019, In: Sinuany-Stern Zilla (eds.), Handbook of Operations Research and Management Science in Higher Education Springer