William Hinton

William Hinton


Research Fellow / Epidemiologist
+44 (0)1483 684272
07 PG 02

Biography

Biography

I am a Research Fellow within the Clinical Informatics & Health Outcomes Research Group (www.clininf.eu) in the Section of Clinical Medicine Ageing. Within my role I provide advanced statistical analysis of diabetes outcomes in primary care, using routinely collected data. My role supports the work of the Diabetes Real World Evidence Centre, which forms part of a newly established collaboration with Eli Lilly.

Prior to my role as a Research Fellow at the university, I was a Visiting Researcher with the team, assisting with research and publications in my spare time. I also have seven years work experience in social research as a Consultation & Survey Analyst and Research Officer within the public sector.

I hold a BSc(Hons) degree in Criminology and Psychology from Keele University and an MSc in Forensic Psychology from the University of Kent.

My publications

Publications

Mcgovern AP, Hinton W, van Vlymen J, Munro N, Whyte M, de Lusignan S (2016) Real-world evidence on prescribing trends in sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors in UK primary care, DIABETIC MEDICINE33pp. 165-165 WILEY-BLACKWELL
Hinton W, McGovern AP, van Vlymen J, Munro N, Whyte M, Jones S, de Lusignan S (2016) Poor glycaemic control is associated with higher serum triglyceride levels in clinical practice,DIABETIC MEDICINE33pp. 157-157 WILEY-BLACKWELL
McGovern AP, Hinton W, Tippu Z, Whyte MB, de Lusignan S (2016) Ethnic disparities in medication persistence for Type 2 diabetes: non-whites have reduced persistence., American Diabetes Association
Hinton W, McGovern A, van Vlymen J, Munro N, Whyte MB, de Lusignan S (2016) Real world evidence on the prescribing trends of glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists in UK primary care,Diabetic Medicine, Volume 33, Issue Supplement S1, March 2016 Special Issue: Abstracts of the Diabetes UK Professional Conference 201633(Supplement S1)pp. 165-165 Wiley
Aim The use of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonists in type 2 diabetes is increasing. We present a description of their current use and prescribing trends in UK primary care and compare the characteristics of people prescribed GLP-1 agonists with phase 3 trial populations.
McGovern A, Hinton W, van Vlymen J, Munro N, Whyte MB, de Lusignan S (2016) Real world evidence on prescribing trends in sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors in UK primary care,Diabetic Medicine, Volume 33, Issue Supplement S1, March 2016 Special Issue: Abstracts of the Diabetes UK Professional Conference 201633(Supplement S1)pp. 165-165 Wiley
Aims: The sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a new class of oral diabetes medication. Prescribing of these agents was initially limited to secondary care but is now moving into primary care. We analyse the current use of this drug class in primary care.
McGovern A, Tippu Z, Hinton W, Munro N, Whyte M, de Lusignan S (2016) Systematic review of adherence rates by medication class in type 2 diabetes: a study protocol,BMJ OPEN6(2)ARTN e010469 BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP
Hinton W, McGovern AP, Whyte MB, Curtis BH, McCullough K, van Brunt K, Calderara S, de Lusignan S (2016) What are the HbA1c thresholds for initiating insulin therapy in people with type 2 diabetes in UK primary care?, European Association for Study Diabetes
Hinton W, McGovern AP, van Vlymen J, Munro N, Whyte M, de Lusignan S (2016) Real-world evidence on the prescribing trends of glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists in UK primary care,DIABETIC MEDICINE33pp. 165-165 WILEY-BLACKWELL
Correa A, Hinton W, McGovern A, van Vlymen J, Yonova I, Jones S, de Lusignan S (2016) Royal College of General Practitioners Research and Surveillance Centre (RCGP RSC) sentinel network: a cohort pro?le,BMJ Open6e011092 BMJ Journals
Purpose: The Royal College of General Practitioners Research and Surveillance Centre (RCGP RSC) is one of the longest established primary care sentinel networks. In 2015, it established a new data and analysis hub at the University of Surrey. This paper evaluates the representativeness of the RCGP RSC network against the English population. Participants and method: The cohort includes 1 042 063 patients registered in 107 participating general practitioner (GP) practices. We compared the RCGP RSC data with English national data in the following areas: demographics; geographical distribution; chronic disease prevalence, management and completeness of data recording; and prescribing and vaccine uptake. We also assessed practices within the network participating in a national swabbing programme. Findings to date: We found a small overrepresentation of people in the 25?44 age band, under-representation of white ethnicity, and of less deprived people. Geographical focus is in London, with less practices in the southwest and east of England. We found differences in the prevalence of diabetes (national: 6.4%, RCPG RSC: 5.8%), learning disabilities (national: 0.44%, RCPG RSC: 0.40%), obesity (national: 9.2%, RCPG RSC: 8.0%), pulmonary disease (national: 1.8%, RCPG RSC: 1.6%), and cardiovascular diseases (national: 1.1%, RCPG RSC: 1.2%). Data completeness in risk factors for diabetic population is high (77?99%). We found differences in prescribing rates and costs for infections (national: 5.58%, RCPG RSC: 7.12%), and for nutrition and blood conditions (national: 6.26%, RCPG RSC: 4.50%). Differences in vaccine uptake were seen in patients aged 2 years (national: 38.5%, RCPG RSC: 32.8%). Owing to large numbers, most differences were significant ( p<0.00015). Future plans: The RCGP RSC is a representative network, having only small differences with the national population, which have now been quantified and can be assessed for clinical relevance for specific studies. This network is a rich source for research into routine practice.
McGovern AP, Hinton W, van Vlymen J, Munro N, Whyte M, de Lusignan S (2016) Real-world evidence on the disparities in prescribing of dipeptidylpeptidase-4 inhibitors in UK primary care, DIABETIC MEDICINE33pp. 183-183 WILEY-BLACKWELL
Hinton W, McGovern A, van Vlymen J, Munro N, Whyte MB, de Lusignan S (2016) Poor glycaemic control is associated with higher serum triglyceride levels in clinical practice,Diabetic Medicine, Volume 33, Issue Supplement S1, March 2016 Special Issue: Abstracts of the Diabetes UK Professional Conference 201633(Supplement S1)pp. 157-157 Wiley
Aims: The relationship between glycaemic control and lipid metabolism in diabetes is complicated and yet to be fully elucidated. Here we aim to characterise the relationship between glycaemic control and serum triglyceride levels in a population with Type 2 diabetes
Mcgovern AP, Hinton W, Correa A, Munro N, Whyte MB, de Lusignan S (2016) Real world evidence studies into treatment adherence, thresholds for intervention, and disparities in treatment, in people with Type 2 Diabetes in the UK,BMJ Open6(11)e012801 BMJ Journals
Purpose The University of Surrey-Lilly Real World Evidence (RWE) diabetes cohort has been established to provide insights into the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). There are 3 areas of study due to be conducted to provide insights into T2DM management: exploration of medication adherence, thresholds for changing diabetes therapies, and ethnicity-related or socioeconomic-related disparities in management. This paper describes the identification of a cohort of people with T2DM which will be used for these analyses, through a case finding algorithm, and describes the characteristics of the identified cohort. Participants A cohort of people with T2DM was identified from the Royal College of General Practitioners Research and Surveillance Centre (RCGP RSC) data set. This data set comprises electronic patient records collected from a nationally distributed sample of 130 primary care practices across England with scope to increase the number of practices to 200. Findings to date A cohort (N=58?717) of adults with T2DM was identified from the RCGP RSC population (N=1?260?761), a crude prevalence of diabetes of 5.8% in the adult population. High data quality within the practice network and an ontological approach to classification resulted in a high level of data completeness in the T2DM cohort; ethnicity identification (82.1%), smoking status (99.3%), alcohol use (93.3%), glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c; 97.9%), body mass index (98.0%), blood pressure (99.4%), cholesterol (87.4%) and renal function (97.8%). Data completeness compares favourably to other, similarly large, observational cohorts. The cohort comprises a distribution of ages, socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds, diabetes complications, and comorbidities, enabling the planned analyses. Future plans Regular data uploads from the RCGP RSC practice network will enable this cohort to be followed prospectively. We will investigate medication adherence, explore thresholds and triggers for changing diabetes therapies, and investigate any ethnicity-related or socioeconomic-related disparities in diabetes management.
Ansari A, de Lusignan S, Hinton W, Munro N, Mcgovern A (2017) The association between diabetes, level of glycaemic control and eye infection: Cohort database study,Primary Care Diabetes11(5)pp. 421-429 Elsevier
Aim: To examine whether diabetes and the degree of glycaemic control is associated with an increased risk of acute eye infection, and prescribing of ocular antimicrobial agents. Design and setting: A retrospective cohort study was carried out using the Royal College of General Practitioners Research and Surveillance Centre database (RCGP RSC), a large primary care database in the United Kingdom. We compared ocular infection rates in people aged e15 years without diabetes to those with diabetes, both type 1 and type 2. We developed logistic regression models to assess the excess risk in diabetes of: conjunctivitis, blepharitis, stye/chalzion, periorbital cellulitis, keratitis/keratoconjunctivitis, lacrimal gland infection, endopthalmitis, and ocular antimicrobial prescriptions over a six-year period (2010?2015). We also analysed the impact of glycaemic control on infection rates in those with diabetes. All models were adjusted for potential confounders. Results: We analysed infection risk in 889,856 people without diabetes and 48,584 people with diabetes (3273 type 1, and 45,311 type 2). After adjustment for confounders both type 1 and type 2 were associated with increased incidence of conjunctivitis (OR 1.61; 95% CI 1.38?1.88; p < 0.0001 and OR 1.11; 95% CI 1.06?1.16; p < 0.0001 respectively). No association was found with blepharitis, stye/chalzion, periorbital cellulitis, keratitis/keratoconjunctivitis, lacrimal gland infection, and endopthalmitis in the whole population. In subgroup analyses blepharitis was more common in those with type 1 diabetes under 50 years old and endopthalmitis in those under 50 with type 2 diabetes. Glycaemic control was not found to be associated with any infection. Diabetes was also associated with an increased incidence of antimicrobial prescriptions (Type 1 OR 1.69; 95% CI 1.51?1.88; p < 0.0001 and type 2 OR 1.17; 95% CI 1.13?1.20; p < 0.0001). Conclusions: Conjunctivitis is recorded more frequently in people with diabetes. However, no substantial increase in recording of other ocular infections was noted. Infection risk was not found to be associated with the degree of glycaemic control
Mcgovern Andrew, Tippu Z, Hinton William, Munro N, Whyte Martin, de Lusignan Simon (2017) Comparison of medication adherence and persistence in type 2 diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis,Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism20(4)pp. 1040-1043 Wiley
Limited medication adherence and persistence with treatment are barriers to successful management of type 2 diabetes (T2D). We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Register of Controlled Trials, PsychINFO and CINAHL for observational and interventional studies that compared the adherence or persistence associated with 2 or more glucose-lowering medications in people with T2D. Where 5 or more studies provided the same comparison, a random-effects meta-analysis was performed, reporting mean difference (MD) or odds ratio (OR) for adherence or persistence, depending on the pooled study outcomes. We included a total of 48 studies. Compared with metformin, adherence (%) was better for sulphonylureas (5 studies; MD 10.6%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 6.5-14.7) and thiazolidinediones (TZDs; 6 studies; MD 11.3%, 95% CI 2.7%-20.0%). Adherence to TZDs was marginally better than adherence to sulphonylureas (5 studies; MD 1.5%, 95% CI 0.1-2.9). Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors had better adherence than sulphonylureas and TZDs. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists had higher rates of discontinuation than long-acting analogue insulins (6 studies; OR 1.95; 95% CI 1.17-3.27). Longacting insulin analogues had better persistence than human insulins (5 studies; MD 43.1 days; 95% CI 22.0-64.2). The methods used to define adherence and persistence were highly variable.
Background:

The Institute of Medicine framework defines six dimensions of quality for healthcare systems: (1) safety, (2) effectiveness, (3) patient centeredness, (4) timeliness of care, (5) efficiency, and (6) equity. Large health datasets provide an opportunity to assess quality in these areas.

Objective:

To perform an international comparison of the measurability of the delivery of these aims, in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) from large datasets.

Method:

We conducted a survey to assess healthcare outcomes data quality of existing databases and disseminated this through professional networks. We examined the data sources used to collect the data, frequency of data uploads, and data types used for identifying people with T2DM. We compared data completeness across the six areas of healthcare quality, using selected measures pertinent to T2DM management.

Results:

We received 14 responses from seven countries (Australia, Canada, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Turkey and the UK). Most databases reported frequent data uploads and would be capable of near real time analysis of healthcare quality.

The majority of recorded data related to safety (particularly medication adverse events) and treatment efficacy (glycaemic control and microvascular disease). Data potentially measuring equity was less well recorded. Recording levels were lowest for patient-centred care, timeliness of care, and system efficiency, with the majority of databases containing no data in these areas. Databases using primary care sources had higher data quality across all areas measured.

Conclusion:

Data quality could be improved particularly in the areas of patient-centred care, timeliness, and efficiency. Primary care derived datasets may be most suited to healthcare quality assessment.

Ansari Samad, de Lusignan Simon, Hinton William, Munro N, Taylor Simon, Mcgovern Andrew Peter (2018) Glycemic control is an important modifiable risk factor for uveitis in patients with diabetes: A retrospective cohort study establishing clinical risk and ophthalmic disease burden.,Journal of Diabetes and Its Complications32(6)pp. 602-608 Elsevier
Aim To characterize the risk uveitis, scleritis or episcleritis in relation to diabetes, glycaemic control, and co-existence of retinopathy. Methods Using the Royal College of General Practitioners Research and Surveillance Centre database, we established the prevalence of acute uveitis and scleritis or episcleritis over a six-year period among populations without(n/=/889,856) and with diabetes(n/=/48,584). We evaluated the impact of glycaemic control on disease risk. Regression modeling was used to identify associations, adjusting for clinical and demographic confounders. Results Incidence of acute uveitis was higher among patients with diabetes; Type 1 OR:2.01 (95% CI 1.18?3.41; p/=/0.009), and Type 2 OR:1.23 (1.05?1.44; p/=/0.01). Glycaemic control was established as an important effect modifier for uveitis risk, whereby those with poorer control suffered higher disease burden. Results confirmed a dose-response relationship such that very poor glycaemic control OR:4.72 (2.58?8.65; p/
de Lusignan Simon, Hinton William, Konstantara Emmanouela, Munro Neil, Whyte Martin, Mount Julie, Feher Michael (2019) Intensification to injectable therapy in type 2 diabetes: mixed methods study (protocol),BMC Health Services Research19284pp. 1-10 BMC

Background

In the UK, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is largely managed in primary care. Delay in the intensification to injectable therapy, a form of clinical inertia, is associated with worse glycaemic control. UK general practice is highly computerised, with care being recorded on computerised medical record systems; this allows for quantitative analysis of clinical care but not of the underpinning decision-making process. The aim of this study is to investigate perceptions of patients and clinicians in primary care on the initiation of injectable therapies in T2D, and the context within which those decisions are made.

Methods

This is a mixed methods study, taking a ?realist evaluation? approach. The qualitative components comprise focus groups, interviews, and video recordings of simulated surgeries; the quantitative analysis: an overview of participating practices, elements of the video recording, and an online survey. We will recruit primary care clinicians (general practitioners and nurses) and patients from a representative sample of practices within the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) Research and Surveillance Centre (RSC) network. Participants will be patients with T2D, and primary care clinicians. Focus groups and semi-structured interviews will be recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using Framework Analysis. The simulated surgeries will include cases that might be escalated to injectable therapy. The consultation will be reviewed using the Calgary-Cambridge model to assess communication and determination of adherence to national prescribing guidelines. We will conduct multi-channel video recording including screen capture, clinician and patient facial expressions, wide angle view of the consultation, and the computerised medical record screen. This allows annotation and qualitative analysis of the video recordings, and statistical analyses for the quantitative data. We will also conduct an online survey of primary care clinicians? attitudes to, and perceptions of, initiation of injectable therapies, which will be analysed using summary statistics.

Discussion

Results aim to provide a detailed insight into the dynamic two-way decision-making process underpinning use of injectable therapy for T2D. The study will provide insights into clinical practice and enable the development of training, interventions and guidelines that may facilitate, where appropriate, the intensification to injectable therapy.