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Dr Diane Lee


Research Fellow B in Infectious Diseases
PhD, MSc, BSc (Hons)

Biography

Areas of specialism

Primary and secondary tissue culture; Epithelial cell biology (lung and GI tract) ; Protein purification ; Molecular biology

University roles and responsibilities

  • Athena Swan SAT member (Vet School)
  • Research Culture Committee representative
  • NASPA Sub-committee member

Research

Research interests

My teaching

My publications

Publications

Lee Diane Frances, Salguero Francisco Javier, Grainger Duncan, Francis Robert James, MacLellan-Gibson Kirsty, Chambers Mark Andrew (2018) Isolation and characterisation of alveolar type II pneumocytes from adult bovine lung, Scientific Reports 8 (1) Nature Publishing Group
Alveolar type II (ATII) cells play a key role as part of the distal lung epithelium, including roles in the innate immune response and as self-renewing progenitors to replace alveolar type I (ATI) cells during regeneration of the alveolar epithelium. Their secretion of surfactant protein helps to maintain homeostasis in the distal lung and exert protective, antimicrobial properties. Despite the cell?s crucial roles, they remain difficult to study, in part due to inefficient and expensive isolation methods, a propensity to differentiate into alveolar type I cells in culture and susceptibility to fibroblast overgrowth from primary isolations. Published methods of isolation often require specialist technology, negatively
impacting the development of in vitro models of disease, including bovine tuberculosis (BTB), a serious re-emerging disease in both animals and humans worldwide. We present here a simple and cost effective method that may be utilised in the generation of bovine primary ATII cells. These exhibit an ATII phenotype in 2D and 3D culture in our studies and are conducive to further study of the role of ATII cells in bovine respiratory diseases.
Lee Diane Frances, Chambers Mark Andrew (2019) Isolation of Alveolar Type II Cells from Adult Bovine Lung, Current Protocols in Toxicology 80 (1) e71 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
Alveolar type II (ATII) cells play a key role as part of the distal lung epithelium, including in the innate immune response and as self?renewing progenitors to replace alveolar type I (ATI) cells during epithelial regeneration. Their secretion of surfactant protein helps maintain homeostasis and exerts protective, antimicrobial properties. ATII cells remain difficult to study, partly due to inefficient and expensive isolation methods, a propensity to differentiate into ATI cells, and susceptibility to fibroblast contamination. Published methods of isolation often require specialized technology, negatively impacting the development of in vitro models of disease, including bovine tuberculosis. Presented here is a simple and cost?effective method for generation of bovine primary ATII cells. These cells exhibit an ATII phenotype in 2D and 3D culture and are conducive to further study of the role of ATII cells in bovine respiratory diseases.

Additional publications