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Sarah Bolger


Teaching Fellow

My publications

Publications

Callwood Alison, Cooke Deborah, Bolger Sarah, Lemanska Agnieszka, Allan Helen (2017) The reliability and validity of multiple mini interviews (MMIs) in values based recruitment to nursing, midwifery and paramedic practice programmes: Findings from an evaluation study,International Journal of Nursing Studies 77 pp. 138-144 Elsevier
Background: Universities in the United Kingdom (UK) are required to incorporate values based recruitment (VBR) into their healthcare student selection processes. This reflects an international drive to strengthen the quality of healthcare service provision. This paper presents novel findings in relation to the reliability and predictive validity of multiple mini interviews (MMIs); one approach to VBR widely being employed by universities.

Objectives: To examine the reliability (internal consistency) and predictive validity of MMIs using end of Year One practice outcomes of under-graduate pre-registration adult, child, mental health nursing, midwifery and paramedic practice students.

Design: Cross-discipline evaluation study. Setting: One university in the United Kingdom.

Participants: Data were collected in two streams: applicants to A) The September 2014 and 2015 Midwifery Studies programmes; B) September 2015 adult; Child and Mental Health Nursing and Paramedic Practice programmes. Fifty-seven midwifery students commenced their programme in 2014 and 69 in 2015; 47 and 54 agreed to participate and completed Year One respectively. 333 healthcare students commenced their programmes in September 2015. Of these, 281 agreed to participate and completed their first year (180 adult, 33 child and 34 mental health nursing and 34 paramedic practice students).

Methods: Stream A featured a seven station four-minute model with one interviewer at each station and in Stream B a six station model was employed. Cronbach?s alpha was used to assess MMI station internal consistency and Pearson?s moment correlation co-efficient to explore associations between participants? admission MMI score and end of Year one clinical practice outcomes (OSCE and mentor grading).

Results:

Stream A: Significant correlations are reported between midwifery applicant?s MMI scores and end of Year One practice outcomes. A multivariate linear regression model demonstrated that MMI score significantly predicted end of Year One practice outcomes controlling for age and academic entry level: coefficients 0.195 (p = 0.002) and 0.116 (p = 0.002) for OSCE and mentor grading respectively. In Stream B no significant correlations were found between MMI score and practice outcomes measured by mentor grading.

Internal consistency for each MMI station was ?excellent? with values ranging from 0.966?0.974 across Streams A and B.

Conclusion: This novel, cross-discipline study shows that MMIs are reliable VBR tools which have predictive validity when a seven station model is used. These data are important given the current international use of different MMI models in healthcare student selection processes.

Callwood Alison, Bolger Sarah, Allan H (2017) The ?values journey? of nursing and midwifery students selected using multiple mini interviews;
Year One findings
,
Journal of Advanced Nursing 74 (5) pp. 1139-1149 Wiley
Aim

to explore how adult, child and mental health nursing and midwifery students, selected using
multiple mini interviews, describe their ?values journey? following exposure to the clinical practice
environment.

Background:

Values based recruitment incorporates assessment of healthcare students? personal
values using approaches like multiple mini interviews. Students? experience of adjustment to their
values during their programme is conceptualised as a ?values journey?. The impact of VBR in
alleviating erosion of personal values is unclear.

Design

A cross
-professional longitudinal cohort study was commenced at one university in England
in 2016 with data collection points at the end of
years
one,
two and
three. Non
-probability consecutive
sampling resulted in 42 healthcare students (8 adult, 8 child and 9 mental health nursing and 17
midwifery students) taking part.

Methods

Six semi
-structured focus groups were conducted at the end of participants? Year One
(DC1). Data analysis incorporated inductive and deductive approaches in a hybrid synthesis.

Findings

Participants described a ?values journey? where their values, particularly communication,
courage and wanting to make a difference, were both challenged and retained. Participants personal
journeys also acknowledged the: ?courage it takes to use values?; ?reality of values in practice? and
?need for self-reflection on values?.