Placeholder image for staff profiles

Dr Sarkawt Hama


Research Fellow (ASAP-Delhi project)
+44 (0)1483 686657
22 AA 03

Academic and research departments

Global Centre for Clean Air Research.

My publications

Publications

Kumar Prashant, Druckman Angela, Gallagher John, Gatersleben Birgitta, Allison Sarah, Eisenman Theodore S., Hoang Uy, Hama Sarkawt, Tiwari Arvind, Sharma Ashish, Abhijith K V, Adlakha Deepti, McNabola Aonghus, Astell-Burt Thomas, Feng Xiaoqi, Skeldon Anne, de Lusignan Simon, Morawska Lidia (2019) The Nexus between Air Pollution, Green Infrastructure and Human Health, Environment International Elsevier
Cities are constantly evolving and so are the living conditions within and between them. Rapid urbanization and the ever-growing need for housing have turned large areas of many cities into concrete landscapes that lack greenery. Green infrastructure can support human health, provide socio-economic and environmental benefits, and bring color to an otherwise grey urban landscape. Sometimes, benefits come with downsides in relation to its impact on air quality and human health, requiring suitable data and guidelines to implement effective greening strategies. Air pollution and human health, as well as green infrastructure and human health, are often studied together. Linking green infrastructure with air quality and human health together is a unique aspect of this article. A holistic understanding of these links is key to enabling policymakers and urban planners to make informed decisions. By critically evaluating the link between green infrastructure and human health via air pollution mitigation, we also discuss if our existing understanding of such interventions is enabling their uptake in practice.

Both the natural science and epidemiology approach the topic of green infrastructure and human health very differently. The pathways linking health benefits to pollution reduction by urban vegetation remain unclear and that the mode of green infrastructure deployment is critical to avoid unintended consequences. Strategic deployment of green infrastructure may reduce downwind pollution exposure. However, the development of bespoke design guidelines is vital to promote and optimize greening benefits and measuring green infrastructure?s socio-economic and health benefits are key for their uptake. Greening cities to mitigate pollution effects is on the rise and these needs to be matched by scientific evidence and appropriate guidelines. We conclude that urban vegetation can facilitate broad health benefits, but there is little empirical evidence linking these benefits to air pollution reduction by urban vegetation, and appreciable efforts are needed to establish the underlying policies, design and engineering guidelines governing its deployment.

Hama Sarkawt M. L., Kumar Prashant, Harrison Roy M., Bloss William J., Khare Mukesh, Mishra Sumit, Namdeo Anil, Sokhi Ranjeet, Goodman Paul, Sharma Chhemendra (2020) Four-year assessment of ambient particulate matter and trace gases in the Delhi-NCR region of India, Sustainable Cities and Society 54 102003 Elsevier
A key challenge in controlling Delhi?s air quality is a lack of clear understanding of the impacts of emissions from the surrounding National Capital Region (NCR). Our objectives are to understand the limitations of publicly available data, its utility to determine pollution sources across Delhi-NCR and establish seasonal profiles of chemically active trace gases. We obtained the spatiotemporal characteristics of daily-averaged particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) and trace gases (NOX,O3,SO2, and CO) within a network of 12 air quality monitoring stations located over 2000 km2 across Delhi-NCR from January 2014 to December 2017. The highest concentrations of pollutants, except O3, were found at Anand Vihar compared with lowest at Panchkula. A high homogeneity in PM2.5 was observed among Delhi sites as opposed to a high spatial divergence between Delhi and NCR sites. The bivariate polar plots and k-means clustering showed that PM2.5 and PM10 concentrations are dominated by local sources for all monitoring sites across Delhi-NCR. A consequence of the dominance of local source contributions to measured concentrations, except to one site remote from Delhi, is that it is not possible to evaluate the influence of regional pollution transport upon PM concentrations measured at sites within Delhi and the NCR from concentration measurements alone.