Research at the Department of Strategy and International Business

Our research has been influential in the fields of social enterprise, international business, organisational behaviour, trade and strategic management. We have published work responding to these themes in world-leading journals.

Research themes

We undertake business-relevant research across a wide range of topics.

International business
  • Foreign direct investment (FDI)
  • Knowledge transfer and multi-national enterprises
  • Locational determinants of FDI
  • Economic globalisation and convergence/divergence of global standards
  • Political risk
  • Foreign market entry 
Strategic management
  • Nonmarket strategy and corporate political activity
  • Environmental management, and research and development partnerships
  • Business model innovation
  • Management learning
  • Strategy and structure of professional services firms 

Research projects

Summary

This study examines the impact of requisite mandate variety on subsidiary performance in a dynamic environment. According to the law of requisite variety, we identify that possessing a requisite number of mandate variety increases the organizational capacity to deal with environment volatility thereby enhancing subsidiary performance in a dynamic environment. Further, we pay particular attention to the requisite attributes of mandate variety. Subsidiaries that implement local-specific mandates, especially focusing on market-seeking mandates, are more likely to achieve higher profitability in the unpredictable local market.

Principal investigator 

Dr Hyeyoun Park

Summary 

This research examines impoverished entrepreneurs, why they may choose to engage in entrepreneurship, and the struggles they face. We draw on the entrepreneurship literature that suggests institutional factors and individual characteristics shape new venture development. Using survey and interview data collected from an impoverished community in Brazil, we develop a study of entrepreneurial behaviour focused on perceived alertness, utilisation of social networks, willingness to formally register their business, and participation in training. We found that temporal myopia, misjudgement of their abilities, and counter-productive use of their social network result in non-productive entrepreneurship.

Principal investigator 

Dr Stelvia Matos

Summary

We investigate the effect of top management team (TMT) gender diversity on environmental management. Drawing on upper echelon theory, we examine how TMT gender diversity influences firms to adopt ISO 14001. We further examine how this influence is affected by organizational, institutional and female executives’ personal attributes. Using Probit instrumental variable regressions, and a sample of 490 listed domestic firms from three highly polluted emerging countries (China, India and Pakistan), we find that the presence of women in TMTs is positively related to the likelihood of ISO 14001 adoption. Additionally, in countries with high institutional gender parity, and in firms that have CSR committees, and female executives have more discretion the relationship between TMT gender diversity and ISO 14001 becomes stronger. Overall, our findings make important contributions to literature and practice.

Principal investigator

Professor Tazeeb Rajwani 

Summary

How do managerial perceptions of deficient legal services affect a foreign subsidiary’s propensity to cultivate political ties and satisfaction with competitive positioning in an emerging market? We attempt to answer this question by applying resource dependence theory and institutional theory in analyzing 181 foreign subsidiaries in the Philippines. Our results indicate that perceived deficiencies in the legal service sector by senior managers are positively related to the cultivation of political ties. Our findings suggest that the relationship between perceived deficiencies in the legal service sector and the cultivation of political ties is stronger for foreign subsidiaries that are in manufacturing-intensive and heavily regulated industries. However, we do not find the market orientation of these foreign subsidiaries to play a role in this process. Further, our results establish that the cultivation of political ties partially mediate the relationship between perceived deficient legal services and managerial satisfaction with a foreign subsidiary’s competitive position.

Principal investigator 

Professor Tazeeb Rajwani

We examine the role of activism in the development of technologies that have the potential to address “grand challenges”, global problems that can be addressed through a coordinated and collaborative effort among public, non-profit, and private organisations. Although the literature provides an economic rationale for inter-organisational collaborations, little research has explored the unanticipated outcomes due to differing missions, values, goals, resources, and constraints amongst actors. Drawing on theories concerned with public-private research partnerships, regulations, stakeholder and social activism, we develop propositions about the long term implications of anti-GMO activism on regulations, and how opposition to controversial technologies may result in unintended consequences that directed efforts away from socially beneficial applications, and exclude public research initiatives from commercialising technology for grand challenge applications.

Principal Investigator

Dr Stelvia Matos

Research at Surrey Business School

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Contact us

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Address
Surrey Business School
Rik Medlik Building
University of Surrey
Guildford
Surrey
GU2 7XH