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Pioneering work in biomedicine celebrated

An emeritus professor from Surrey has been hailed as one of ‘the makers of modern biomedicine’ in a project funded by the Wellcome Trust to celebrate groups and individuals who have made a significant contribution to the science.

Professor Jo Arendt

An emeritus professor from Surrey has been hailed as one of ‘the makers of modern biomedicine’ in a project funded by the Wellcome Trust to celebrate groups and individuals who have made a significant contribution to the science.

Professor Josephine Arendt, Emeritus Professor of Endocrinology, is a specialist on biological rhythms and has pioneered the field of chronobiology - a field of biology that studies how our body’s natural cycles are generated and influenced by environmental rhythms.

As one of the featured scientists in the History of Modern Biomedicine Research Group’s ‘Makers of Modern Biomedicine’ project, Professor Arendt discusses her life and career through a series of oral histories.

Professor Arendt has researched biological rhythms and their mechanisms widely in animals and humans, including studies on jet-lag, sleep disorders in the blind, shift work, and devised techniques to measure the hormone melatonin, which plays a role in our natural sleep-wake cycle.

She said: “I am honoured to be featured as one of the ‘Makers of Modern Biomedicine’'. I am delighted that my colleagues have continued to pursue the study of biological rhythms and sleep with considerable success. I would especially like to thank Prof Debra Skene and Dr Benita Middleton for their collaboration over many years.”

The interviews are available at the History of Modern Biomedicine website

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