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Cameron Price


Postgraduate Research Student

Academic and research departments

Department of Chemical and Process Engineering.

My publications

Publications

Price C, Pastor-Pérez L, Le Saché E, Sepúlveda-Escribano A, Ramirez Reina T (2017) Highly active Cu-ZnO catalysts for the WGS reaction at medium-high space velocities: effect of the support composition,International Journal of Hydrogen Energy 42 (16) pp. 10747-10751 Elsevier
Cu-ZnO based catalysts are the benchmark materials for the low-temperature WGS reaction. However, they present a crucial drawback which limits their application in portable devices: they only work under very low space velocities. In this study, we have developed a series of multicomponent Cu-ZnO catalysts able to work at relatively high space velocities with outstanding activity and stability. Different reference supports have been utilised with CeO2-Al2O3 being the most promising system. Overall, this work describes a strategy to design advanced Cu-based catalysts that can overcome the residence time restrictions in the WGS reaction.
Price Cameron, Earles Emily, Pastor-Perez Laura, Liu Jian, Ramirez Reina Tomas (2018) Advantages of Yolk Shell Catalysts for the DRM: A Comparison of Ni/ZnO@SiO2 vs. Ni/CeO2 and Ni/Al2O3.,Chemistry 1 (1) pp. 3-16 MDPI
Encapsulation of metal nanoparticles is a leading technique used to inhibit the main deactivation mechanisms in dry reforming of methane reaction (DRM): Carbon formation and Sintering. Ni catalysts (15%) supported on alumina (Al2O3) and ceria (CeO2) have shown they are no exception to this analysis. The alumina supported catalysts experienced graphitic carbonaceous deposits, whilst the ceria showed considerable sintering over 15 h of DRM reaction. The effect of encapsulation compared to that of the performance of uncoated catalysts for DRM reaction has been examined at different temperatures, before conducting longer stability tests. The encapsulation of Ni/ZnO cores in silica (SiO2) leads to advantageous conversion of both CO2 and CH4 at high temperatures compared to its uncoated alternatives. This work showcases the significance of the encapsulation process and its overall effects on the catalytic performance in chemical CO2 recycling via DRM.
Price Cameron, Arnold William, Pastor-Perez Laura, Amini-Horri Bahman, Reina Thomas R. (2019) Catalytic upgrading of a biogas model mixture via low temperature DRM using multicomponent catalysts.,Topics in Catalysis Springer Verlag
The catalytic performance of a series of bimetallic Ni-Co/CeO2-Al2O3 catalysts were evaluated within the dry reforming of methane (DRM) reaction, commonly used for upgrading biogas. The study focused on the variation of CeO2 weight loadings between 0, 10, 20 and 30%. It was found that the addition of CeO2 promoted CH4 and CO2 conversion across the temperature range and increased H2/CO ratio for the ?low temperature? DRM. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), H2-Temperature Programmed Reduction (H2-TPR) and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis revealed the formation of Ce4+ during activation of the 30% sample, resulted in excessive carbon deposition during reaction. The lowest CeO2 weight loadings exhibited softer carbon formation and limited increased chemical stability during reaction at the expense of activity. Of the tested weight loadings, 20 wt% CeO2 exhibited the best balance of catalytic activity, chemical stability and deactivation resistance in the DRM reaction. Hence this catalyst can be considered a promising system for syngas production from biogas at relatively low temperatures evidencing the pivotal role of catalysts design to develop economically viable processes for bioresources valorisation.
The development of catalytic materials for the recycling CO2 through a myriad of available processes is an attractive field, especially given the current climate change. While there is increasing publication in this field, the reported catalysts rarely deviate from the traditionally supported metal nanoparticle morphology, with the most simplistic method of enhancement being the addition of more metals to an already complex composition. Encapsulated catalysts, especially yolk@shell catalysts with hollow voids, offer answers to the most prominent issues faced by this field, coking and sintering, and further potential for more advanced phenomena, for example, the confinement effect, to promote selectivity or offer greater protection against coking and sintering. This work serves to demonstrate the current position of catalyst development in the fields of thermal CO2 reforming and hydrogenation, summarizing the most recent work available and most common metals used for these reactions, and how yolk@shell catalysts can offer superior performance and survivability in thermal CO2 reforming and hydrogenation to the more traditional structure. Furthermore, this work will briefly demonstrate the bespoke nature and highly variable yolk@shell structure. Moreover, this review aims to illuminate the spatial confinement effect and how it enhances yolk@shell structured nanoreactors is presented.
Price Cameron Alexander Hurd, Ramirez Reina Tomas, Liu Jian (2020) Engineering heterogenous catalysts for chemical CO‚ utilization: Lessons from thermal catalysis and advantages of yolk@shell structured nanoreactors,Journal of Energy Chemistry Elsevier
The development of catalytic materials for the recycling CO‚ through a myriad of available processes is an attractive field, especially given the current climate change. While there is increasing publication in this field, the reported catalysts rarely deviate from the traditionally supported metal nanoparticle morphology, with the most simplistic method of enhancement being the addition of more metals to an already complex composition. Encapsulated catalysts, especially yolk@shell catalysts with hollow voids, offer answers to the most prominent issues faced by this field, coking and sintering, and further potential for more advanced phenomena, for example, the confinement effect, to promote selectivity or offer greater protection against coking and sintering. This work serves to demonstrate the current position of catalyst development in the fields of thermal CO‚ reforming and hydrogenation, summarizing the most recent work available and most common metals used for these reactions, and how yolk@shell catalysts can offer superior performance and survivability in thermal CO‚ reforming and hydrogenation to the more traditional structure. Furthermore, this work will briefly demonstrate the bespoke nature and highly variable yolk@shell structure. Moreover, this review aims to illuminate the spatial confinement effect and how it enhances yolk@shell structured nanoreactors is presented.
Price Cameron Alexander Hurd, Pastor-Perez Laura, Ramirez Reina Tomas, Liu Jian (2020) Yolk-Shell structured NiCo@SiO‚ nanoreactor for CO‚ upgrading via reverse water-gas shift reaction,Catalysis Today Elsevier
This work reports the successful and simplistic synthesis of highly uniform NiCo@SiO‚ yolk@shell catalysts, with their effectiveness towards CO‚ recycling investigated within the RWGS reaction. The engineered microstructure catalysts display high CO‚ conversion levels and a remarkable selectivity for CO as main reaction product across the whole examined temperatures. Interestingly, the selectivity is affected by Ni loading reflecting a close correlation catalytic performance/material structure-composition. Further to this behaviour, the designed nanoreactor exhibits considerable deactivation resistance and performance under reaction cycling conditions and appears to demonstrate the production of larger organic molecules after qualitative analysis of the product gas by mass spectrometry. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the spatial confinement effect, imbued to the material from its advanced morphology, through its influence of deactivation resistance and control of reactive selectivity.