Chanaka Jayawardhena

Professor Chanaka Jayawardhena


Professor of Marketing and Head of Department
+44 (0)1483 683981
14 MS 03
Please Email in advance to confirm: normally Wednesdays 1400-1600hrs

Academic and research departments

Department of Marketing and Retail Management.

Biography

University roles and responsibilities

  • Head of Department - Department of Marketing & Retail Management
  • Member of Senior Management Team
  • Chair in Marketing
  • REF Output Review Panel
  • Personal/Academic Tutor

    My qualifications

    BSc (Hons)
    Univesity of Moratuwa, Sri Lanka
    MPhil
    University of Cambridge, UK.
    PhD
    De Montfort University, UK

    Previous roles

    Professor of Marketing
    University of Hull
    Senior Lecturer
    University of Loughborough

    Research

    Research interests

    Supervision

    Postgraduate research supervision

    Completed postgraduate research projects I have supervised

    My teaching

    My publications

    Publications

    Ragwala, Shenaz, Jayawardhena, Chanaka & Saxena, Gunjan (2020). “From caged birds to women with wings”: A perspective on consumption practices of new middle-class Indian women”, European Journal of Marketing
    View abstract View full publication
    This study aims to explore consumption practices of new middle-class Indian women to explicate how they are challenging traditional social norms and redefining their identity through their consumption practices. A total of 32 semi-structured and photo-elicitation interviews were conducted with new middle-class women between the age group of 23 and 40 years in India. This study illustrates how the doing of consumption practices that involve creating, controlling, knowing and transforming is enabling new middle-class Indian women to undo gender disparities embedded in hegemonic patriarchal social order. Also, the study provides new insights into how class and symbolic capital intersect gender to redefine middle-class women’s feminine self. This study specifically illustrates how new middle-class women are using consumption practices to uplift their position in household; bring about new modes of social interface; and identity expression and a reversal in gender roles. The conflation of women’s independence with consumerism underlines the need for marketers to position consumer goods in a manner that strengthens women’s self and alleviates cultural perceptions of women as subordinate to men in the household. Indian market has considerable growth potential for publicly visible brands that affirm the elevated social status of women and allow them to effectively demonstrate their capital resources. An under-researched consumer segment is explored by focusing particularly on the intersection of discourses of women’s individuality with that of their consumption practices. Additionally, pioneering use of photo-elicitation technique coupled with hermeneutic approach enabled to elicit effectively women’s reflections on their behaviours, values and motivations underlying their consumption practices.

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    Liu, Hongfei; Jayawardhena, Chanaka; Osburg, Victoria-Sophie; Mohiuddin Babu, Mujahid (2019). “Do Online Reviews Still Matter Post-Purchase?”, Internet Research
    View abstract View full publication
    The influence of electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM) information, such as online reviews, on consumers’ decision making is well documented, but it is unclear if online reviews still matter in post-purchase evaluation and behaviours. The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which online reviews (aggregate rating (AR) and individual reviews (IR)) influence consumers’ evaluation and post-purchase behaviour by considering the valence congruence of online reviews and consumption experience (CE). Following social comparison theory and relevant literature, the authors conduct an online experiment (pre-test: =180; main study: =347). The authors rely on a 2 (CE valence) ×2 (AR valence) ×2 (IR valence) between-subjects design. Congruence/incongruence between the valences of CE, AR and IR affects consumers’ post-purchase evaluation at the emotional, brand and media levels and review-writing behaviour. In comparison to aggregated rating, IR are more important in the post-purchase stage. Similarly, consumers have a higher eWOM-writing intention when there is congruence between the valences of CE, AR and IR. The authors demonstrate the importance of service providers continually monitoring their business profiles on review sites to ensure consistency of review information, as these influence consumers’ post-purchase evaluation and behaviours. For this reason, the authors illustrate the utility of why media owners of review sites should support the monitoring process to facilitate the engagement of both businesses and customers. The authors break new ground by empirically testing the impact of online review information post-purchase seen through the theoretical lens of social comparison. The approach is novel in breaking down and testing the dimensions of post-purchase evaluation and behavioural intentions in understanding the social comparison elicited by online reviews in the post-purchase phase.

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    Hongfei Liu., Jayawardhena, Chanaka., Dibb, Sally & Raanaweera, Chatura (2019). “Examining the trade-off between compensation and promptness in eWOM-triggered service recovery: A restorative justice perspective” Tourism Management
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    Our research examines the effectiveness of monetary compensation and the promptness of response during electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM)-triggered service recovery. Drawing upon restorative justice theories, we explore three main questions: whether the hotel's response to negative online reviews are always beneficial; whether offering compensation or responding promptly is more efficient under different levels of service failure severity; and how the hotel's response influences consumers' future engagement through eWOM media. Experimental results reveal that making minimum online service recovery effort is only effective in fixing consumer attitudes for less severe service failures. Compensation is the optimal solution for less severe failures, while prompt response is optimal for more severe service failures. The hotel's responsiveness to negative reviews and the service recovery outcome positively influence consumers' future eWOM behaviours through the same online medium. Implications for hotels seeking cost-effective management of negative reviews and for online media owners are offered.

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    Izogo, E.E. and Jayawardhena, C (2019). Building committed online shoppers through shopping goals and switching cost. Journal of Marketing Analytics
    View abstract View full publication
    We develop a comprehensive and integrated framework of online shopping experience (hereafter OSE) from an emerging market perspective. Using a netnographic research method, we content analysed 284 experiential reviews of 2 leading Nigerian e‐retailers. Augmented by the theory of customer engagement, we identify 8 dimensions of OSE that activate shoppers' affective and cognitive states, which consequently lead to 4 behavioural outcomes, namely, internal responses to service experience, external responses to service experience, repurchase intentions, and word of mouth intentions. The proposed dynamic and comprehensive framework reflects all phases of the consumer decision‐making process and demonstrates that OSE has both perceptual and behavioural components. We make 3 important contributions. First, the paper provides a comprehensive and dynamic model of customer experience that encompasses all the stages in the customer decision‐making process by drawing on a new theoretical perspective to demonstrate how the unique attributes of OSE contribute to extant customer experience research. Second, we advance experiential consumption theory by incorporating attributes of OSE evolved through a unique qualitative research method into existing frameworks of customer experience. Third, we compare and contrast findings from an emerging market with research from more mature markets, when they were undergoing similar development patterns. From a managerial perspective, we illustrate how online retailers operating in emerging markets can draw from the experiences of mature markets and understand the key differences between markets so that they can develop customer experience management strategies by concentrating on the most important components of customer experience.

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    Mujahid Babu & Hongfei Liu , Jayawardhena, C (2019). Impact of market orientation on firm’s customer-based performance: the moderating role of employee orientation, Journal of Marketing Management:
    View abstract View full publication
    ABSTRACT The effect of a firm’s strategic orientation, such as customer orientation, on performance has received research attention; however, knowledge regarding its specific effect on the customer-related performance measures is very limited. Most of the previous attempts have focused on developing a direct relationship with a firm’s financial performance, which contradicts with the central tenet of customer orientation. In addition, in this context, the role of employees’ committed behavior, customer contact time and a firm’s emphasis on interfunctional coordination for the efficacy of customer orientation have received little research attention. Drawing on dynamic capability theory and service climate theory, this study addresses how employees and a firm’s interfunctional coordination play a key role in the firm’s customer orientation to drive its customer-related performance. Based on a sample from the UK’s service industry, the findings support the arguments. The findings also offer new insights into the interplay of different strategic orientations and employees’ role in driving superior performance through customer orientation.
    Al-hajla, Ali Homaid, Nguyen, B., TC Melewar and Jayawardhena, C., Ghazali, E and Mutum, D. S. (2018). “Understanding new religion-compliant product adoption (NRCPA) in Islamic markets” Journal of Global Marketing
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    Abstract This study examines the relationships between religious beliefs, brand personality, and new religion-compliant product adoption (NRCPA) in Islamic markets. Findings confirm that religious consumers tend to behave in accordance with a society or group that follows the same beliefs, and that these consumers’ behavior and lifestyle are influenced by similar religious groups and social relationships. In addition, the more religious the consumer, the more likely they will adopt or favour/disfavour a new product in accordance with his/her religious beliefs. Finally, the three constructs–relative advantages, compatibility and complexity–are found to partially mediate the influential relationship between religious beliefs and new religion-compliant product adoption. International firms that target Muslim markets, with an aim to profit and fit in these markets, must take into account the Islamic values, standards and guidelines.
    Izogo, E. and Jayawardhena, C. (2018). "Online shopping experience in an emerging e-retailing market" Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing
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    While e-commerce has been widely cited as the new marketing frontier, thus necessitating the need to deliver seamless shopping experiences across various online channels to achieve success, very few firms have the well withal to clearly tie customer experience investments to marketing outcomes. Theoretically speaking, the understanding of the drivers and outcomes of online shopping experience especially group behavior is imprecise. Therefore, this paper aims to investigate the drivers and outcomes of online shopping experience (OSE). A combination of netnography and conversation analysis was used on a pool of qualitative data generated from the Facebook page of a leading online retailer that has online presence in 11 African countries. Two broad categories of OSE under seven drivers and five distinct behavioral outcomes of OSE emerged from the study. The two categories of OSE drivers, though unique, widely fit into the existing frameworks of OSE. The study also indicates that shoppers seize other shoppers’ reviews as a suitable platform to engage in a wide range of behaviors. The main theoretical implications include the following: complaint handling is not only a behavioral construct but also a stimulator/driver of online shopping experience; consumer behavior is stimulated more by cognitive drivers; trust is an outcome of OSE which leads to not only electronic word of mouth but also external response to service failure; and shoppers perceive external response to service failure as the last resort and this last resort can be activated by regrets and poor internal response to service failure. The major limitation of this study is that the proposed conceptual model was not empirically tested. Future research is required to validate the model. The managerial implications of the findings are that in addition to providing superior shopping experience through enhancing the drivers of OSE identified in this study, online retailers must work assiduously to reduce incidents leading to service failures and promptly undertake service recovery actions whenever service failure occurs. Online retailers especially those operating in emerging markets will therefore benefit from their service recovery investments if they proactively install processes that enable them to promptly and satisfactorily recover failed services. This paper contributes to service science research by proposing a unique belief-attitude-intention model of the drivers and outcomes of OSE on a relatively underexplored field. The proposed conceptual model advances the stimulus-organism-response framework, theory of planned behavior, satisfaction theories and shopping behavior literature in several directions.

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    Izogo, E. and Jayawardhena, C. (2018). "Online shopping experience in an emerging e-retailing market: Towards a conceptual model", Journal of Consumer Behaviour,
    View abstract View full publication
    We develop a comprehensive and integrated framework of online shopping experience (hereafter OSE) from an emerging market perspective. Using a netnographic research method, we content analysed 284 experiential reviews of 2 leading Nigerian e‐retailers. Augmented by the theory of customer engagement, we identify 8 dimensions of OSE that activate shoppers' affective and cognitive states, which consequently lead to 4 behavioural outcomes, namely, internal responses to service experience, external responses to service experience, repurchase intentions, and word of mouth intentions. The proposed dynamic and comprehensive framework reflects all phases of the consumer decision‐making process and demonstrates that OSE has both perceptual and behavioural components. We make 3 important contributions. First, the paper provides a comprehensive and dynamic model of customer experience that encompasses all the stages in the customer decision‐making process by drawing on a new theoretical perspective to demonstrate how the unique attributes of OSE contribute to extant customer experience research. Second, we advance experiential consumption theory by incorporating attributes of OSE evolved through a unique qualitative research method into existing frameworks of customer experience. Third, we compare and contrast findings from an emerging market with research from more mature markets, when they were undergoing similar development patterns. From a managerial perspective, we illustrate how online retailers operating in emerging markets can draw from the experiences of mature markets and understand the key differences between markets so that they can develop customer experience management strategies by concentrating on the most important components of customer experience.

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    Al-hajla, Ali Homaid, Nguyen, B., TC Melewar and Jayawardhena, C (2018). “Advancing Islamic branding: The influence of religious beliefs and religion-compliant product adoption” The Marketing Review,
    View abstract View full publication
    Despite its importance to the world economy, religious values of Islam have been neglected in previous marketing studies. This paper aims to review the literature of Islamic branding by focusing on the impact of religious beliefs on branding perceptions among Muslim consumers' adoption of religion-compliant products. A comprehensive review of the extant literature on Islamic branding is completed. In general, religiosity related literature still suffers a dearth of knowledge, and only a limited number of studies have been conducted. The discussion put forward in this paper around Islamic brands, religious beliefs and religion-compliant production adoption suggest that the more religious the consumers are, the more their behaviour in regard to consumption of new product adoption is driven by their religious teachings. This notion requires more research as it will be beneficial to employ it to predict religious consumers' behaviour towards certain acts such as the adoption of religion-compliant new products.
    Harness, D., Ranaweera, C. & Karjaluoto, H. Jayawardhena, C (2018). “The role of negative and positive forms of power in supporting CSR alignment and commitment between Large Firms and SMEs”, Industrial Marketing Management.
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    Do large firms exert power to shape the CSR behavior of their SME partners?” We answer this question by proposing a model built on the stakeholder theory and the shareholder theory, and go on to explain how this impact influences the commitment of the SME towards their large partner. The model highlights the central role that different forms of power exercised by the large firm play in the process. A survey of 291 SMEs confirms the key hypotheses, including the mediating role of reward power. The effects of coercive power are noteworthy and they illustrate the complex and competing forces at play in influencing CSR behavioral change in SMEs. The research makes a novel contribution to practice by highlighting among other things, how power, as a negative force via coercion or positively through expert or reward benefits, support or becomes counterproductive to the change process.

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    Alzaidi, Z., Nguyen, B. Alhajla, A. and Jayawardhena, C. (2018). "A Review of Service Quality and Service Delivery: Towards A Customer Co-Production and Customer-Integration Approach", Business Process Management Journal
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    The purpose of this paper is to provide researchers with an overview of the service quality and delivery domain, focussing on the inclusion of customer co-production and customer integration. Specifically, this paper concentrates on service quality (including quality measurement), the service environment, controls and their consequences. A comprehensive review of the literature is conducted, analysed and presented. The review shows that service delivery is both complex and challenging, particularly when considering the unique characteristics of services and the high level of customer involvement in their creation. The facilitation, transformation and usage framework identifies how failures can occur at each stage of service delivery, beginning with the characteristics of the service environment, while control theory offers insights into the formal and informal controls that may be applied in the facilitation and transformation stages, which may reduce the likelihood or extent of such failures. Despite the fact that it is widely accepted that service quality is an antecedent to customer satisfaction, it is surprising that this customer co-creation aspect has been largely neglected in the extant literature. As such, the role that customer co-production plays in service quality performance has been examined in this paper. It is hoped that this examination will enhance both theoretical and practical understanding of service quality. It would be useful to find modern tools that can help in improving service quality performance.

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    Izogo, E., Jayawardhena, C. and Kalu, A (2017). “Examining customers’ experience with the Nigerian Bank Verification Number (BVN) policy from the perspective of a dual-lens theory” International Journal of Emerging Markets
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    Although customer experience has been widely researched, its effects on behavior toward a government policy are still unclear. Drawing on two theories with some similar and opposing perspectives, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of three components of customer experience (i.e. utilitarian experience, hedonic experience and relational experience) and customers’ intention on behavior within the context of the BVN policy implemented by the Nigerian apex bank. Data emerged from one of the most populous districts in south-eastern Nigeria. Participants were recruited by mall-intercept. Out of the 283 participants approached, 246 participated but only 82.9 percent were valid for analysis. After subjecting data to statistical screening to confirm its suitability for parametric statistical analysis and examining data for the potential effects of common method variance as well as sample representativeness, a partial least squares structural equation modelling technique and the Preacher and Hayes bootstrapping procedures were utilized to test the hypothesized relationships. Based on data obtained from Nigerian bank customers, the paper demonstrated that the customer loyalty arising from the implementation of a government policy is determined more by hedonic experience, followed by relational experience and very much less by utilitarian experience. Findings also indicate that the relationship between the components of customer experience and customer loyalty is complementarily mediated by intention to open new account(s). Though the theoretical grounding of the paper strongly supports the study design, the authors strongly recommend that future research should examine customer experience-customer behavior models in situations of policy implementation with longitudinal design. Additionally, since intention to open new account(s) is a complementary mediator of the links between the components of customer experience and customer loyalty, there is need for future researchers to integrate other mediators into the conceptual framework that the authors examined in this paper. This paper cautions that whilst the research findings play out effectively in situations where the benefits of the introduced policy and the consumers’ belief in the good intent of the policy are congruent and customers are susceptible to the manipulations of the social class leading to absence of volitional control; firms should not be deceived into relying too heavily on this kind of loyalty because it is situational and consequently promiscuous. Nevertheless, deploying more resources to seamlessly meet the needs of customers in such situations is counter-productive for service organizations. Based on the findings, it has come to the fore that consumers will be at the receiving end of a government policy poorly implemented by service organizations. When such policies are rolled out therefore, governments should enforce operational modalities that will forestall potential negative experiences that consumers could possibly encounter. By examining the effects of three components of customer experience and intention to open new account(s) on customer loyalty within the context of BVN implementation in an emerging banking sector, the authors contribute to the broad stream of literature that focuses on the effect of customer experience on company bottom-line. The strength of this contribution is based on the premise that this paper draw on the similarities and opposing orientations of two theories to uncover these effects. The authors show that the effects of the three components of customer experience on customer loyalty is different from the results of previous research because of the unique perspective adopted in this paper.

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    Matti Leppäniemi, Chanaka Jayawardhena, Heikki Karjaluoto, David Harness, (2017). Unlocking behaviors of long-term service consumers: the role of action inertia", Journal of Service Theory and Practice,
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    The purpose of this paper is to examine the antecedents of word-of-mouth (WOM) in long-term service settings. Specifically, the authors examine the moderating role of action inertia in the relationships between satisfaction and repatronage intention, satisfaction and WOM, and repatronage intention and WOM. The proposed model was empirically tested using survey data from 1,385 telecommunications service subscribers. The data were analyzed using partial least squares path modeling. Results suggest that a positive link between repatronage intention and WOM, hereto a neglected relationship in the marketing literature, in contrast to previous literature, the behaviors of long-term customers are not predictable, and action inertia strengthens satisfaction – WOM and repatronage intention – WOM links and weakens satisfaction – repatronage intention link. This study examines customers of a utilitarian service. To further determine the potential of the model, it is desirable to explore the validity of the model in other service settings, particularly those with high hedonic values. The study provides valuable insights into repatronage intention – WOM link, with particular emphasis on the measurement and analysis of action inertia. This is important in understanding and evaluating inertia influences and identification of the drivers of WOM. These insights can be used by managers to better allocate their resources when investing in customer loyalty-building exercises and in generating WOM. This paper contributes to the literature in three main ways. First, it examines the nuances of customer loyalty in continuous service contexts. Second, the study empirically tests the role of repatronage intention as an antecedent of WOM. Third, the study introduces and tests the moderating role of action inertia on positive WOM.

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    Elbedweihy, A. M., Jayawardhena, C. & Elsharnouby, M. (2016). Customer Relationship Building: The role of brand attractiveness and consumer-brand identification”, Journal of Business Research
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    Building enduring relationships with consumers is a key marketing objective for most firms, but how can they develop such relationships? Drawing on social identity and self-verification theories, this research postulates that value congruence and customer-to-customer similarity drives consumer–brand identification directly and indirectly through brand attractiveness, which in turn paves the way for the development of deep relationships with brands (captured through brand loyalty and resilience to negative information). The findings show that (1) brand identification extends to both private and public consumption settings, but the respective drivers of identification markedly differ; (2) the similarity–attraction paradigm helps explain why consumers are attracted to some brands and not others; (3) identified consumers tend to ignore negative information they receive about the brand. Findings suggest that managers should identify the salient determinants for enhancing identification and create the highest possible congruence between the values of the target market and the brand.

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    Jayawardhena, C., Morrell, K. & Chris Stride (2016). “Ethical Consumption Behaviours in Supermarket Shoppers: Determinants and Marketing Implications", Journal of Marketing Management.
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    ABSTRACT Understanding how consumers make ethical purchases has numerous benefits for firms and other stakeholders. Although several ethical decision-making frameworks seek to explain such purchasing behaviour, they typically focus on the content of such decisions, rather than considering how such decisions unfold in a given context. Yet, the complexities of consumer choice suggest that greater insight into how consumers make ethical purchases in store can enhance understanding. We report our findings from a survey of a geographically disperse sample of 688 UK shoppers and argue that a naturalistic theory of decision making, image theory, enhances our ability to explain consumer behaviour in this setting. As well as contributing to theoretical understanding of consumer choice, this has implications for the merchandising of ethical products, such as Fair Trade and ‘green’ goods.
    Mustonen, N Karjaluoto, H. & Jayawardhena, C. (2016). "Environmental values, green image, perceived value and loyalty in industrial markets", Business Strategy and the Environment,
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    Concern over the effect of industries on the natural environment is growing on a multitude of levels. This study examines the effects of how perceptions of (a) environmental values, (b) green image and (c) perceived value of industrial customers influence their loyalty towards suppliers in existing relationships, and how the length of B2B relationships may moderate these linkages. A conceptual framework is developed and data are collected from a global sample ( =121) of B2B customers. We find that both green image and perceived value have a direct positive link with customer loyalty and that environmental values are positively linked to the green image of the supplier. Moreover, the effect of green image on loyalty is mediated by perceived value, with environmental values only indirectly linked with perceived value of the supplier. As the length of relationship increases, on one hand the positive relationship between green image and customer loyalty is strengthened, while on the other the positive relationship between environmental value and green image is weakened. Regardless of how environmentally aware the customer is, green image is a strong predictor of both perceived value and loyalty. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment

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    Wu, M. M., Jayawardhena, C. & Hamilton, R. (2014). A comprehensive examination of internet banking user behaviour: evidence from customers yet to adopt, currently using and stopped using, Journal of Marketing Management,
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    Abstract Despite the surge in interest in research on customers’ adoption of internet banking (IB), how discontinued users can be brought back to IB has not received much attention. To respond to this question and to provide a comprehensive understanding of IB customer behaviour, we develop a conceptual model grounded on the extended technology acceptance model, and empirically validate it using a sample of 614 IB customers (including those yet to adopt, current users and discontinued users) from China. Perceived value is the most important driver for explaining all categories of customers’ IB-related behaviours. Banks that implement measures that aim to increase the perceived usefulness of IB and enhance the value of IB are likely to be rewarded with increasing IB adoption amongst its customer base.
    Ranaweera, C & Jayawardhena, C (2014). “Talk up or criticize? Customer responses to WOM about competitors during social interactions”, Journal of Business Research
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    Popular metrics such as the Net Promoter Score (NPS) highlights many benefits of word of mouth (WOM) to firms. Is WOM all it is claimed to be? Building on social identity theory, this research develops a conceptual model of WOM exchange in social settings and tests the model with customer surveys of three service sectors. The findings show that the effects of (1) positive and negative WOM (P/NWOM)  about competitors and (2) perceived presence of critical incidents (PPCIs) on P/NWOM  about own service provider are far from intuitive. Responses to PWOM received counter the suggestions in the NPS literature. The findings also indicate that the best firms can hope for when receiving NWOM about competitors is that their customers remain silent. It is recommended that firms communicate a message that is consistent with the nuanced views expressed by friends in social circles, rather than a uniformly superior positioning.

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    Al-Qeisi, K. Alamanos, E. Dennis, C. & Jayawardhena, C (2014). “Website design quality and usage behaviour: Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology”, Journal of Business Research
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    Firms gain many benefits from well-designed websites. But which elements of website design quality really matter, and how do these elements influence usage behavior? With the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) as the theoretical foundation, this paper proposes that website design quality is a multi-dimensional construct with a higher-order structure that, when successfully incorporated into the UTAUT model, outperforms existing models. Results are based on a survey of 216 users of internet banking. Findings indicate that the technical, general content and appearance dimensions of a website are most important for users. These dimensions are significantly related to usage behavior directly and indirectly. A halo effect may influence overall evaluation of a website because the dimensions of website design quality are interrelated. The implication is that improvements to the appearance of a website should enhance the overall evaluation of the site, leading to greater usage intentions.

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    Karjaluoto, H. Töllinen, A., Pirttiniemi, J. & Jayawardhena, C (2014). “Intention to Use Mobile Customer Relationship Management Systems”, Industrial Management & Data Systems,
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    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the behavioral intentions of business-to-business (B2B) sales managers to use mobile customer relationship management (CRM) systems in the course of their day-to-day activities. An extended Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) of mobile CRM system adoption is developed and tested with data from 105 international sales managers representing five B2B companies. The study extends the TAM framework with three additional constructs derived from mobile technology and sales force automation literature, namely personal innovativeness in the domain of IT, perceived risk, and perceived reachability. The model demonstrates that personal innovativeness and perceived reachability have significant effects on the TAM framework. The relatively small sample size limits the generalization of the results. Sales managers’ intention to adopt mobile CRM can be explained by the extended TAM framework. Understanding the key factors that influence intention to adopt a mobile CRM system will aid companies in implementing it among their sales force. Companies willing to foster adoption of a mobile CRM system among the sales force could focus on communicating the usefulness of using the system and benefits gained from enhanced reachability. Recruiting sales people with strong personal innovativeness is beneficial. This study responds the calls for studies on mobile platforms and on the use of mobile B2B applications in sales force management. It is among the first attempts to incorporate variables derived from mobile technology acceptance literature among the sales force into the TAM framework, to better explain acceptance of mobile CRM systems.

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    El-Bedweihy, A. & Jayawardhena, C (2014). “Consumer-brand identification: A social identity based review and research directions”, The Marketing Review,
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    Abstract Consumer-brand identification (CBI) has gained increasing attention in the marketing literature over the past decade as a determinant of consumers' in-role and extra-role behaviour. Despite the growing interest, there are a number of problems with the conceptualisation and operationalisation of the construct in the marketing literature. In this paper, we explore this gap in the literature by presenting a critique of how consumer identification has been defined and highlight the distinction between CBI and other conceptually similar constructs ranging from self-brand connection to self-image congruence. We present a review of the current operationalisations of the consumer identification construct and raise some key problems with existing measurements. A review of the antecedents and consequences of consumer identification is also undertaken. The paper provides a valuable contribution to the marketing field by integrating a wide body of research on an important topic and by offering several insights and broad avenues for future research.
    Abrantes, J. L., Seabra, C., Lages, C. & Jayawardhena, C (2014). “Electronic Word-of-Mouth (e-WOM): Usage motivations as drivers”, European Journal of Marketing,
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    The purpose of this study is to address a recent call for additional research on electronic word‐of‐mouth (eWOM). In response to this call, this study draws on the social network paradigm and the uses and gratification theory (UGT) to propose and empirically test a conceptual framework of key drivers of two types of eWOM, namely in‐group and out‐of‐group. The proposed model, which examines the impact of usage motivations on eWOM in‐group and eWOM out‐of‐group, is tested in a sample of 302 internet users in Portugal. Results from the survey show that the different drivers (i.e. mood‐enhancement, escapism, experiential learning and social interaction) vary in terms of their impact on the two different types of eWOM. Surprisingly, while results show a positive relationship between experiential learning and eWOM out‐of‐group, no relationship is found between experiential learning and eWOM in‐group. This is the first study investigating the drivers of both eWOM in‐group and eWOM out‐of‐group. Additional research in this area will contribute to the development of a general theory of eWOM. By understanding the drivers of different eWOM types, this study provides guidance to marketing managers on how to allocate resources more efficiently in order to achieve the company's strategic objectives. No published study has investigated the determinants of these two types of eWOM. This is the first study offering empirical considerations of how the various drivers differentially impact eWOM in‐group and eWOM out‐of‐group.

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