Andrew Davidson

Andrew Davidson


Teaching Fellow in Acting & Musical Theatre, Programme Leader, BA (Hons) Theatre
BA (Theatre), BMus (Hons), PGDip Dramatic Art (Directing), PGDip Music (Composition), MMus
+44 (0)1483 684143
04 GSA 00

Biography

University roles and responsibilities

  • Teaching Fellow B
  • Programme Leader, BA (Hons) Theatre
  • Wellbeing Champion for GSA

    My qualifications

    Master of Music
    Longy School of Music of Bard College, Cambridge MA, USA
    Postgraduate Diploma of Dramatic Art (Directing)
    National Institute of Dramatic Art, Sydney, Australia
    Postgraduate Diploma in Music (Composition)
    University of Sydney, Australia
    Bachelor of Arts (Theatre)
    University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
    Bachelor of Music (Honours Class I)
    University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia

    My publications

    Publications

    Andrew Davidson (2021). "Konstantin Stanislavski and Emile Jaques-Dalcroze: historical and pedagogical connections between actor training and music education", Stanislavski Studies, DOI: 10.1080/20567790.2021.1945811
    View abstract View full publication
    This paper explores the fields of actor training and music education in order to illuminate the historical and pedagogical connections between the work of Konstantin Stanislavski and Emile Jaques-Dalcroze. It identifies historical parallels between their artistic practices, including their dedication to rhythm and polyrhythm. It illustrates the ways in which their pedagogical paths crossed. It analyses the artistic lineage that can be drawn from the work of Jaques-Dalcroze at the Hellerau Institute to the work of Stanislavski at the Moscow Art Theatre. This includes the influence of Dalcroze Eurhythmics on the development of Tempo-Rhythm. The paper considers how aspects of Stanislavskian actor training are reflected in aspects of Dalcrozian music education, including ensemble work, intention and emotion, and the evolution of psychophysical performance. It proposes that there is a correlation between the creative process undertaken by an actor on a play text, known as Active Analysis, and the creative process undertaken by a musician on a compositional score, known as Plastique Animée. Comparing the pedagogical principles of Stanislavski and Jaques-Dalcroze from the author’s own perspective as an actor trainer and music educator reveals areas for further research. This paper presents themes that are transferable to artists and educators engaged in continuing professional development.
    Andrew Davidson (2021). "‘The cycle of creativity’: a case study of the working relationship between a dance teacher and a dance musician in a ballet class", Research in Dance Education, DOI: 10.1080/14647893.2021.1971645
    View abstract View full publication
    Research on the role of the ballet pianist is limited. A gap in the literature concerns the ways in which dance instructors and accompanists ‘make sense’ of their collaboration. The working relationship between a dance teacher and a dance musician in a ballet class was investigated. The researcher, a ballet pianist, conducted a semi-structured, in-depth interview with a ballet-teacher colleague who is also a musician and composer. The data was analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA), a methodology which takes into account the interpretations of the participant (dance teacher) and the researcher (dance musician). This single case study presents three higher-order themes: ‘the cycle of creativity’ between the teacher, musician, and students; ‘a tonic sense in the body’ facilitated by the musician’s playing; and ‘the ideal situation’ regarding the musician’s sensory awareness during the class. It also reveals two subordinate themes that challenge effective relationships: the students’ perceived response to percussion; and the teacher’s use of recorded music. The results offer insight into specific perceptions and understandings that are transferable to dance teachers and dance musicians engaged in continuing professional development.