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Dr Graham Hieke


Research projects

My publications

Publications

Hieke, G. (2018). Who volunteers for the Special Constabulary, in Bullock, K, Millie, A (eds) The Special Constabulary Historical Context, International Comparisons and Contemporary Themes. Abingdon: Routledge, pp.65-79
Hieke, G (2018). General perspectives on volunteer motivation within the Special Constabulary in Bullock, K, Millie, A (eds) The Special Constabulary Historical Context, International Comparisons and Contemporary Themes. Abingdon: Routledge, pp. 80-93.
Bullock, K., Fielding, J., & Hieke, G. (2018). Retiring from the police service in England and Wales: a multi-dimensional perspective. Ageing and Society 40 (1), pp. 1-24.
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The experiences of police officers who have retired from the police service have rarely comprised the focus of empirical studies in England and Wales. Drawing on the findings of a survey of former police officers, this article examines the circumstances within which officers leave the service and aspects of the transition to retirement. We find that that certain individual, role and organisational factors come together to explain how the transition to retirement is experienced by police officers. We conceptualise police retirement as a multi-dimensional process during which a number of factors may come into play and have different effects depending on the circumstances in which retirement occurs. Findings are considered in light of wider conceptualisations of the process of retirement and implications are discussed.
Fielding, N., Bullock, K., Fielding, J., & Hieke, G. (2017). Patterns of injury on duty and perceptions of support amongst serving police personnel in England and Wales, Policy and Society 28 (9) pp. 1005-1024
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This article reports the findings of a large-scale survey ( = 10,897) which sought to reveal patterns of injury on duty (IoD) and perceptions of organisational and other support amongst serving police personnel in England and Wales. We found that IoD is a multi-faceted issue incorporating wide-ranging physical and psychological injuries and illnesses. We also found that, by their own testimony, IoD is not experienced equally amongst police personnel. Reported experiences of IoD together with satisfaction with, and priorities for, support in the aftermath of injury were shaped by injury type, the role played in the police organisation and the individual characteristics of police personnel, notably, gender. Conceptual and practical implications are discussed.
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Harris, M., Shaw, D., Scully, J., Smith, C. M., & Hieke, G. (2016). The Involvement/Exclusion Paradox of Spontaneous Volunteering: New Lessons and Theory From Winter Flood Episodes in England, Non-profit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly 46 (2) pp. 352-371
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This article focuses on the involvement and management of spontaneous volunteers (SVs). It develops a new theory—which we call the “involvement/exclusion” paradox—about a situation which is frequently manifested when SVs converge in times of disaster. After reviewing research and policy guidance relating to spontaneous volunteering, we present findings from a study of responses to winter flood episodes in England. Taking together the empirical findings and the literature, the article analyzes elements inherent in the involvement/exclusion paradox and develops a conceptual model to illustrate and explain the paradox. Implications for managers and future research are discussed.