Professor Tim Jackson


Professor of Sustainable Development and Director of the Centre for the Understanding of Sustainable Prosperity (CUSP)
+44 (0)1483 689072
06 BA 02
PA: Gemma Birkett

Academic and research departments

Centre for Environment and Sustainability.

Biography

Affiliations and memberships

The Club of Rome
Full member
UNEP Sustainable Lifestyles Taskforce
Member
New Economics Foundation
Associate
Sustainable Development Research Network
Advisor
Alliance Trust Sustainable Futures Fund
Advisor
Aviva Sustainable and Responsible Investment Advisory Board
Advisor
Advisory Board, New Energy Solutions Partners, Asset Management
Chair
Academy of Social Sciences (AcSS)
Academician
Royal Society for the Encouragement of the Arts, Manufactures and Commerce (FRSA)
Fellow

Research

Research interests

My publications

Highlights

This page is currently being developed. Please go to timjackson.org.uk/publications for an updated overview of Tim's publications.

 

Publications

Jackson TD (2008) An Immoral Climate. London. Sustainable Development Commission.,
Garnett T, Jackson TD (2007) Frost Bitten: an exploration of refrigeration dependence in the UK food chain and its implications for climate policy. Paper presented to the 11th European Roundtable on Sustainable Consumption and Production.,
Jackson TD, Pepper M (2010) Consumerism as Theodicy - an explanation of religions and secular meaning functions, In: Thomas L (eds.), Consuming Paradise
Hogg N, Jackson T (2009) Digital Media and Dematerialization, JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY 13 (1) pp. 127-146 WILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC
Stymne S, Jackson T (2000) Intra-generational equity and sustainable welfare: a time series analysis for the UK and Sweden,ECOLOGICAL ECONOMICS 33 (2) pp. 219-236 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Chitnis M, Druckman A, Sorrell S, Jackson T (2010) An investigation into the rebound and backfire effects from abatement actions by UK households,In: RESOLVE Working Paper Series 05-10
This paper explores the hypothesis (most notably made by French economist Thomas Piketty) that slow growth rates lead to rising inequality. If true, this hypothesis would pose serious challenges to achieving 'prosperity without growth' or meeting the ambitions of those who call for an intentional slowing down of growth on ecological grounds. It would also create problems of social justice in the context of a 'secular stagnation'. The paper describes a closed, demand-driven, stock-flow consistent model of Savings, Inequality and Growth in a Macroeconomic framework (SIGMA) with exogenous growth and savings rates. SIGMA is used to examine the evolution of inequality in the context of declining economic growth. Contrary to the general hypothesis, we find that inequality does not necessarily increase as growth slows down. In fact, there are certain conditions under which inequality can be reduced significantly, or even eliminated entirely, as growth declines. The paper discusses the implications of this finding for questions of employment, government fiscal policy and the politics of de-growth.
Victor PA, Jackson T (2012) A Commentary on UNEP's Green Economy Scenarios, Ecological Economics 77 (May 2012) pp. 11-15 Elsevier
Druckman A, Jackson TD (2008) The Surrey Environmental Lifestyle MApping (SELMA) framework: development and key results to date. RESOLVE Working Paper 08-08, University of Surrey, RESOLVE Working Paper
Jackson T (2007) Sustainable consumption, pp. 254-268
Chitnis M, Sorrell S, Druckman A, Firth SK, Jackson T (2014) Who rebounds most? Estimating direct and indirect rebound effects for different UK socioeconomic groups,Ecological Economics 106 pp. 12-32
This study estimates the combined direct and indirect rebound effects from various types of energy efficiency improvement and behavioural change by UK households and explores how these effects vary with total expenditure. The methodology is based upon estimates of the expenditure elasticity and GHG intensity of 16 categories of goods and services, and allows for the capital cost and embodied emissions of the energy efficiency measures themselves. The study finds that rebound effects, in GHG terms, are modest (0-32%) for measures affecting domestic energy use, larger (25-65%) for measures affecting vehicle fuel use and very large (66-106%) for measures that reduce food waste. Furthermore, measures undertaken by low income households are associated with the largest rebound effects, with direct emissions forming a larger proportion of the total rebound effect for those households. Measures that are subsidised or affect highly taxed energy commodities may be less effective in reducing aggregate emissions. These findings highlight the importance of allowing for rebound effects within policy appraisals, as well as reinforcing the case for economy-wide carbon pricing. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.
Jackson T, Oliver M (2000) The viability of solar photovoltaics,ENERGY POLICY 28 (14) pp. 983-988 ELSEVIER SCI LTD
Constanza R, Alperovitz G, Daly HE, Farley J, Franco C, Jackson T, Kubiszewski I, Schor J, Victor P (2013) Vivement 2050,
Jackson TD (2007) Review of Offer A. The Challenge of Affluence.,Social Policy and Administration: an international journal of policy and research 41 (7) pp. 787-789
Jackson T (2011) Societal transformations for a sustainable economy, NATURAL RESOURCES FORUM 35 (3) pp. 155-164 WILEY-BLACKWELL
Jackson T, Papathanasopoulou E (2008) Luxury or 'lock-in'? An exploration of unsustainable consumption in the UK: 1968 to 2000, ECOLOGICAL ECONOMICS 68 (1-2) pp. 80-95 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015The current generation of older people who are approaching or recently experiencing retirement form part of a unique generational habitus who have experienced a cultural shift into consumerism. These baby boomers are often portrayed as engaging in excessive levels of consumption which are counter to notions of sustainable living and to intergenerational harmony. This paper focuses on an exploration of the mechanisms underpinning the consumption patterns of baby boomers as they retire. We achieve this through an understanding of the everyday practices of grocery shopping which have the potential to give greater clarity to patterns of consumption than the more unusual or ?extraordinary? forms of consumption such as global travel. In-depth interviews with 40 older men and women in four locations across England and Scotland were conducted at three points in time across the period of retirement. We suggest that the grocery shopping practices of these older men and women were influenced by two factors: (a) parental values and upbringing leading to the reification of thrift and frugality as virtues, alongside aspirations for self-actualisation such as undertaking global travel, and (b) the influence of household context, and caring roles, on consumption choices. We conclude with some tentative observations concerning the implications of the ways baby boomers consume in terms of increasing calls for people to live in more sustainable ways.
Pepper M, Jackson T, Uzzell D (2006) Christianity and Consumerism: Views from the Pews,
Thompson S, Marks N, Jackson TD (2013) Well-being and Sustainable Development, In: David S, Boniwell I, Conley A (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Happiness pp. 498-517 Oxford University Press
Jackson TD (2012) The Cinderella economy: an answer to unsustainable growth?, The Ecologist
Shaw R, Attree M, Jackson T (2010) Developing electricity distribution networks and their regulation to support sustainable energy, Energy Policy 38 (10) pp. 5927-5937
Jackson TD (2008) Motivating Sustainable Consumption, In: Reddy S (eds.), Green Consumerism - approaches and country experiences 6 Icfai University Press
Pepper M, Jackson T, Uzzell D (2006) Christianity and Sustainable Consumption: An Investigation of Religiosity and Consumer Behaviours,
Oliver M, Jackson T (2001) Energy and economic evaluation of building-integrated photovoltaics,ENERGY 26 (4) pp. 431-439 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD
Jackson T (2008) What politicians dare not say, NEW SCIENTIST 200 (2678) pp. 42-43
Jackson T (2005) Live better by consuming less? Is there a "double dividend" in sustainable consumption?, JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY 9 (1-2) pp. 19-36 M I T PRESS
Druckman A, Jackson TD (2007) The local Area Resource Analysis (Lara) Model: Concepts, Methodology and Applications., RESOLVE Working Paper series 02-07 University of Surrey
Mulugetta Y, Jackson T, van der Horst D (2010) Carbon reduction at community scale, Energy Policy 38 (12) pp. 7541-7545
Jackson TD (2013) Foreword,In: Rathzel N (eds.), Trade Unions in the Green Economy. Working for the Environment
Jackson TD (2014) The dilemma of growth: prosperity v economic expansion., The Guardian 'Rethinking Prosperity' Blog
Druckman A, Bradley P, Papathanasopoulou E, Jackson T (2008) Measuring progress towards carbon reduction in the UK,ECOLOGICAL ECONOMICS 66 (4) pp. 594-604 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Hayward B, Jackson TD, Evans D (2009) Global Survey on Sustainable Lifestyles - Analysis of UK respondents., Report to the UNEP GSSL. Guildford: RESOLVE
Druckman A, Buck I, Hayward B, Jackson TD (2013) Time, gender and carbon: how British adults use their leisure time, In: Coote A, Franklin J (eds.), Time on our side: why we all need a shorter working week. pp. 101-112 New Economics Foundation
Sundin E, Svensson N, McLaren J, Jackson T (2001) Materials and energy flow analysis of paper consumption in the United Kingdom, 1987-2010,Journal of Industrial Ecology 5 (3) pp. 89-105
This article presents the results of a life-cycle materials and energy flow analysis for the pulp and paper cycle in the United Kingdom. Material flows are reconstructed for the period between 1987 and 1996 for all major processes associated with the paper cycle, and system energy requirements are calculated over this period using the best available data. Attention is drawn to the import dependence of U.K. paper demand, and the significant energy requirements associated with upstream forestry processes. The historical trend analysis is then used to model possible future developments in materials and energy consumption until 2010 under a variety of assumptions about process technology improvements, wastepaper utilization rates, and changing demand trends. The results indicate that policy options to increase recycling yield some energy benefits, but these are small by comparison with the benefits to be gained by reducing consumption of paper and improving process technology. The structure of the electricity supply industry in the United Kingdom means that global energy benefits could also be achieved by increasing the contribution from imported pulp.
Druckman A, Buck AI, Hayward B, Jackson T (2012) Time, gender, carbon: A study of the carbon implications of British adults' use of time., International Journal of Ecological Economics and Statistics 84 pp. 153-163 Elsevier
Parkinson S, Begg K, Bailey P, Jackson T (2001) Accounting for flexibility against uncertain baselines: lessons from case studies in the eastern European energy sector,CLIMATE POLICY 1 (1) pp. 55-73 ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD
Jackson TD (2013) The trouble with productivity, In: Coote A, Franklin J (eds.), Time on our side: why we all need a shorter working week New Economics Foundation
Druckman A, Buck I, Hayward B, Jackson TD (2012) Carbon and time: A study of the carbon implications of British adults use of time,RESOLVE Working Paper SEries 01-12 University of Surrey
Geyer R, Jackson T (2004) Supply loops and their constraints: The industrial ecology of recycling and reuse,CALIFORNIA MANAGEMENT REVIEW 46 (2) pp. 55-+ UNIV CALIF
Jackson TD (2013) Angst essen Seele auf - Escaping the 'iron cage' of Consumerism, Wuppertal Spezial
Fudge S, Hunt L, Jackson TD, Mulugetta Y, Peters M (2008) The political economy of energy regulation in the UK 1945-2007: Paradigms and policy. Resolve Working Paper Series, 02-08, University of Surrey, RESOLVE Working Paper Series
Jackson TD, McBride N, Abdallah S, Marks N (2008) Measuring regional progress: regional index of sustainable economic well-being (R-ISEW) for all the English regions., London: New Economics Foundation
Peters M, Jackson TD (2008) Community action a force for social change? Some conceptual observations. Resolve Working Paper Series, 01-08, University of Surrey., RESOLVE Working Paper Series (01-08)
This paper provides a concise overview of how the term ?community? has been
conceptualised in sociological literatures, noting that there remains considerable
uncertainty with regard to the way in which communities could or should be
defined.
The paper explores concepts relevant to the progression of community-based
initiatives and other approaches to pursuing community action as a force for social
change (e.g. individual and collective behavioural change towards a more
sustainable future). It is suggested that these attempts need to capitalise on the
special nature of communities, tapping into their innovative and receptive capacity.
An understanding of some of the theoretical underpinnings can be useful in
providing a framework from which to develop carefully planned action strategies.
Druckman A, Jackson TD (2009) Mapping our carbon responsibilities: more key results from the Surrey Lifestyles MApping (SELMA) framework, RESOLVE Working Paper Series 02-09
Victor P, Jackson T (2011) Doing the maths on the green economy, NATURE 472 (7343) pp. 295-295 NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP
Roeser F, Jackson T (2002) Early experiences with emissions trading in the UK,Greener Management International (39) pp. 43-54
As a key element in its climate change strategy, the UK government launched a greenhouse gas emissions trading scheme in April 2002. The UK ETS is the first-ever national, industry-wide carbon trading scheme in the world and will eventually form part of the global carbon market which is expected to be established under the Kyoto Protocol. This paper assesses the effectiveness of the scheme both in facilitating emission reductions and also as driver towards moving from a fossil-fuel-based economy towards a low-carbon economy. By looking at early developments in the UK ETS and examining the emission profiles of FTSE 100 companies, the paper reveals some serious weaknesses and highlights that the environmental credibility of the market is hampered by low standards of emissions monitoring and reporting. The authors argue that a fundamental review of the UK scheme is required, to improve its environmental credibility and to bring it in line with the planned EU-wide scheme.
Michaelis P, Jackson T (2000) Material and energy flow through the UK iron and steel sector. Part 1: 1954-1994,RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND RECYCLING 29 (1-2) pp. 131-156 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Druckman A, Jackson T (2010) The bare necessities: How much household carbon do we really need?,ECOLOGICAL ECONOMICS 69 (9) pp. 1794-1804 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Parkinson S, Begg K, Bailey P, Jackson T (2001) Accounting for flexibility against uncertain baselines: Lessons from case studies in the eastern European energy sector, Climate Policy 1 (1) pp. 55-73
The Kyoto Protocol defines two project-based flexibility mechanisms: joint implementation (JI) and the clean development mechanism (CDM). The main methodological problem associated with both these mechanisms is the choice of an appropriate baseline: since the baseline is, by definition, counterfactual, it imposes considerable uncertainty on the accounting framework. Little work to date has been carried out on trying to estimate how large this uncertainty might be for particular project types. This paper aims to fill this gap by proposing an approach to baseline construction which explicitly acknowledges this uncertainty. This approach is illustrated through the examination of pilot JI projects in the energy sector in eastern Europe, and then discussed in terms of its implications for climate policy. The results presented are estimates of the range of counterfactual uncertainty in greenhouse gas emission reductions based on the construction of a number of possible baselines for each project. This range is found to be about ±35% for demand side projects, ±45% for heat supply projects, ±55% for cogeneration projects, and ±60% for electricity supply projects. Estimates of uncertainty in the costs of the pilot projects are also found to be high. The paper discusses the problems arising from such large uncertainty and starts to indicate how this uncertainty may be managed. © 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.
Chitnis M, Druckman A, Hunt L, Milne S, Jackson TD (2009) Analysing the Role of Lifestyles in Determining UK Household Energy Demand and GHG Emissions: Predictions and Scenarios to 2050.,
Peters MD (2010) Community engagement and social organization: introducing concepts, policy and practical applications, In: Peters M, fudge S, Jackson T (eds.), Low Carbon Communities 1 Edward Elgar Publishing
COMMUNITIES AND SOCIAL ORGANISATION A critical challenge for implementing
programmes of prevention and intervention within communities revolves around how
...
Armstrong A, Jackson T (2015) The Mindful Consumer. Mindfulness training and the escape from consumerism,
Bedford T, Collingwood P, Darnton A, Evans D, Getersleben B, Abrahamse W, Jackson TD (2011) Guilt: an effective motivator for pro-environmental behaviour change?, RESOLVE Working Paper Series, 07-11
Papathanasopoulou E, Jackson T (2008) Fossil resource trade balances: Emerging trends for the UK, ECOLOGICAL ECONOMICS 66 (2-3) pp. 492-505 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Cooper G, Green NC, Burningham K, Evans D, Jackson T (2012) Unravelling the threads: discourses of sustainability and consumption in an online forum,Environmental communication 6 (1) pp. 101-118 Routledge, Taylor & Francis
This article analyzes an online discussion that followed an article published by UK environmental activist and journalist George Monbiot in The Guardian online newspaper. The analysis addresses the ways in which participants in an online forum debate responded to the tensions and contradictions between lifestyle, consumption, and sustainability highlighted in the original article. The discursive construction of class, green political orientations, and identities; visions of ?the good life?; and appeals to religion and science are highlighted throughout the analysis?as are the discursive strategies for positioning self, other, and audience in the debate. The argument emphasizes the heterogeneity of discursive positioning and reflects on the role of social media in the politics of consumption and sustainability, especially given the inherent reflexivity of web forums as online communicative forms.
Jackson TD (2013) The Altruist Within, pp. 4-9
Chitnis M, Druckman A, Hunt LC, Jackson T, Milne S (2012) Forecasting UK household expenditure and associated GHG emissions: outlook to 2030,In: RESOLVE Working Paper 02-12
Jackson T (2009) Beyond the Growth Economy, JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY 13 (4) pp. 487-490 WILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC
Peters M, Fudge S, Jackson T (2010) Low Carbon Communities, Edward Elgar Publishing
This collection is a hugely valuable contribution to our understanding, and to the work of practitioners and policy makers alike.
Atkinson JGB, Jackson T, Mullings-Smith E (2009) Market influence on the low carbon energy refurbishment of existing multi-residential buildings, ENERGY POLICY 37 (7) pp. 2582-2593 ELSEVIER SCI LTD
Uzzell David, White E (2015) Changing Tastes: Meat in Our Life Histories,In: Jackson T, Christie I (eds.), Lifestyles Values and the Environment Routledge
Bradley P, Jackson TD, Druckman A, Papathanasopoulou E (2007) Attributing upstream (process) wastes to household consumption activities - a case study for selected waste streams of the UK: 1995 and 2004. Paper presented to the 11th European Roundtable on Sustainable Consumption and Production.,
Chitnis M, Druckman A, Hunt LC, Jackson T, Milne S (2012) Forecasting scenarios for UK household expenditure and associated GHG emissions:
Outlook to 2030
,
Ecological Economics 84 pp. 129-141 Elsevier
Using the modelling tool ELESA (Econometric Lifestyle Environment Scenario Analysis), this paper describes
forecast scenarios to 2030 for UK household expenditure and associated (direct and indirect) greenhouse gas
(GHG) emissions for 16 expenditure categories. Using assumptions for real household disposable income,
real prices, ?exogenous non-economic factors? (ExNEF), average UK temperatures and GHG intensities,
three future scenarios are constructed. In each scenario, real expenditure for almost all categories of UK expenditure
continues to grow up to 2030; the exceptions being ?alcoholic beverages and tobacco? and ?other
fuels? (and ?gas? and ?electricity? in the ?low? scenario) leading to an increase in associated GHG emissions
for most of the categories in the ?reference? and ?high? scenarios other than ?food and non-alcoholic beverages?,
?alcoholic beverages and tobacco?, ?electricity?, ?other fuels? and ?recreation and culture?. Of the future
GHG emissions, about 30% is attributed to ?direct energy? use by households and nearly 70% attributable to
?indirect energy?. UK policy makers therefore need to consider a range of policies if they wish to curtail emissions
associated with household expenditure, including, for example, economic measures such as taxes
alongside measures that reflect the important contribution of ExNEF to changes in expenditure for most categories
of consumption.
Mair S, Druckman A, Jackson T (2014) Global inequities and emissions in Western European textiles and clothing consumption,JOURNAL OF CLEANER PRODUCTION 132 pp. 57-69 ELSEVIER SCI LTD
Costanza R, Alperovitz G, Daly H, Farley J, Franco C, Jackson T, Kubiszewski I, Schor J, Victor P (2014) What would a Sustainable and Desirable Economy-in-Society-in Nature Look like?, In: Costanza R, Kubiszewski I (eds.), Creating a Sustainable and Desirable Future. Insights from 45 global thought leaders.
Begg KG, Jackson T, Parkinson S (2001) Beyond joint implementation - designing flexibility into global climate policy,ENERGY POLICY 29 (1) pp. 17-27 ELSEVIER SCI LTD
Victor P, Costanza R, Alperovitz G, Daly H, Farley J, Franco C, Jackson T, Kubiszewski I, Schor J (2013) Building a Sustainable and Desirable Economy-in-Society-in-Nature, ANU E Press
The world has changed dramatically.
Hayward B, Jackson TD (2011) New Graduates face a more uncertain future than ever before, The Guardian, Sustainable Business Blog
Papathanasopoulou E, Jackson T (2010) The United Kingdom's Fossil Resource Consumption Between 1968 and 2000, JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY 14 (2) pp. 354-370 WILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC
Shaw R, Attree M, Haniak M, Kay M, Jackson TD (2007) A Tool to Analyse the Regulatory Incentives on a Distribution Network Operator at a Project Level. 19th International Conference on Electricity Distribution. CIRED,
Costanza R, Alperovitz G, Daly HE, Farley J, Franco C, Jackson T, Kubiszewski I, Schor J, Victor P (2015) Ecological economics and sustainable development: Building a sustainable and desirable economy-in-society-in-nature, In: Routledge International Handbook of Sustainable Development pp. 281-294
Davis J, Geyer R, Clift R, Jackson T, Azapagic A (2002) A time series material flow analysis of the UK steel sector, STEEL IN SUSTAINABLE CONSTRUCTION: IISI WORLD CONFERENCE 2002, CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS pp. 267-272 INT IRON AND STEEL INST
Gatersleben B, White E, Abrahamse W, Jackson TD, Uzzell D (2009) Materialism and Environmental Concern. Examining Values and Lifestyle Choices among Participants of the 21st Century Living Project, RESOLVE Working Paper Series 01-09
Jackson TD (2012) Prosperity without growth, In: Hinterberger F, Freytag E, Pirgmaier E, Schuster M (eds.), Growth in transition pp. 62-65 Earthscan/Routledge
Druckman A, Chitnis M, Sorrell S, Jackson T (2012) Missing carbon reductions? Exploring rebound and backfire effects in UK households,Energy Policy 49 pp. 778-778 Elsevier
Households are expected to play a pivotal role in reducing the UK?s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and the UK Government is encouraging specific household actions to help meet its targets. However, due to there bound effect, only a portion of the GHG emission reductions estimated by simple engineering calculations are generally achieved in practice. For example, replacing short car journeys by walking or cycling reduces consumption of motorfuels. But this frees up money that may be spent on, for example, purchasing extra clothes or flying on vacation. Alternatively, the money may be put into savings. Since all of these options lead to GHG emissions, total GHG savings may be less than anticipated. Indeed, in some instances, emissions may increase ? a phenomenon known as ?backfire?. We estimate that there bound effect for a combination of three abatement actions by UK households is approximately 34%. Targeting re-spending on goods and services with a low GHG intensity reduces this to a minimum of around 12%, while re-spending on goods and services with a high GHG intensity leads to backfire. Our study highlights the importance of shifting consumption to lower GHG intensive categories and investing in low carbon investments.
Jackson TD (2007) Lord make me a green tourist - but not just yet, The Edge
Jackson TD, Hayward B, Evans D (2011) UK Youth: the conflicts of contemporary lifestyles, In: Visions for change: recommendations for effective policies on sustainable lifestyles. UNEP report 2011
Hallsworth A, Lewington T, Jackson TD (2008) Sustainable Consumption and Consumer Policy. A report to the Dept. of Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform. London BERR,
Jackson TD (2007) Where on earth will it end? Consumerism as Theodicy, Sofia 85
Druckman A, Jackson TD (2009) The bare necessities: how much household carbon do we really need?, RESOLVE Working Paper Series 05-09
Druckman A, Jackson TD (2007) Towards a Low Carbon Society: a highly disaggregated model of household energy consumption and production. Paper presented to the 11th European Roundtable on Sustainable Consumption and Production.,
Michaelis P, Jackson T (2000) Material and energy flow through the UK iron and steel sector - Part 2: 1994-2019,RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND RECYCLING 29 (3) pp. 209-230 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Concern over the environmental and social implications of modern consumption patterns has emerged as a defining feature of debates about sustainable development. During the last decade, these concerns have crystallised around the concept of 'sustainable consumption'. This paper briefly reviews the recent history of this debate. It highlights, in particular, the failure of policy-makers to agree on precise definitions of sustainable consumption and the contentious nature of exhortations to 'consume less'. In spite of these difficulties, the author suggests that progress towards understanding and changing unsustainable patterns of consumption is not only necessary bur possible. Such progress relies, however, on two key understandings: firstly, an informed view of the wider and deeper debates about consumption and consumer behaviour within which the sustainable consumption debate sits; and secondly, a culturally open approach to the role of policy in negotiating change. The paper highlights, in particular, the potential for community-based initiatives for social change. Far from offering an intractable policy domain, the author argues that a sophisticated understanding of the social and institutional context of consumer action opens out a much more creative vista for policy innovation than has hitherto been recognised.
Jackson TD (2009) Prosperity Without Growth: Economics for a Finite Planet, Routledge/Earthscan
Dickinson J, Jackson T, Matthews M, Cripps A (2009) The economic and environmental optimisation of integrating ground source energy systems into buildings, ENERGY 34 (12) pp. 2215-2222 PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD
Chitnis M, Sorrell S, Druckman A, Firth SK, Jackson T (2013) Turning lights into flights: Estimating direct and indirect rebound effects for UK households,Energy Policy 55 pp. 234-250
Energy efficiency improvements by households lead to rebound effects that offset the potential energy and emissions savings. Direct rebound effects result from increased demand for cheaper energy services, while indirect rebound effects result from increased demand for other goods and services that also require energy to provide. Research to date has focused upon the former, but both are important for climate change. This study estimates the combined direct and indirect rebound effects from seven measures that improve the energy efficiency of UK dwellings. The methodology is based upon estimates of the income elasticity and greenhouse gas (GHG) intensity of 16 categories of household goods and services, and allows for the embodied emissions of the energy efficiency measures themselves, as well as the capital cost of the measures. Rebound effects are measured in GHG terms and relate to the adoption of these measures by an average UK household. The study finds that the rebound effects from these measures are typically in the range 5-15% and arise mostly from indirect effects. This is largely because expenditure on gas and electricity is more GHG-intensive than expenditure on other goods and services. However, the anticipated shift towards a low carbon electricity system in the UK may lead to much larger rebound effects. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
Jackson TD (2013) Intriduzione, In: Green Economy Rapporto 2013. Un Green New Deal Per L Italia pp. 15-32 Edizioni Ambiente
Chitnis M, Sorrell S, Druckman A, Firth S, Jackson TD (2014) Who rebounds most? Estimating direct and indirect rebound effects for different UK socioeconomic groups.,SLRG Working Paper Sesries 01-2014
Sinclair P, Papathanasopoulou E, Mellor W, Jackson T (2005) Towards an integrated regional materials flow accounting mode, JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY 9 (1-2) pp. 69-84 M I T PRESS
Druckman A, Jackson TD (2010) Minimum needs, minimum carbon? Exploring the carbon footprint of minimum income diets,
Druckman A, Chitnis M, Sorrell S, Jackson TD (2010) Shifting sands? Exploring rebound and the backfire in a changing economy,
Jackson T (2013) Material Concerns: Pollution, profit and quality of life,Material Concerns: Pollution, Profit and Quality of Life pp. 1-218
© 1996 Stockholm Environment Institute. All rights reserved.Material Concerns offers new perspectives on key environmental issues - pollution prevention, ecological economics, limits to sustainability, consumer behaviour and government policy. The first non-technical introduction to preventative environmental management, Material Concerns offers realistic prospects for improving the quality of life.
Abdallah S, Knuutila A, Neitzert E, Lawlor E, Esteban A, Jackson TD (2009) Scoping project for development Regional Index of Sustainable Economic Well-being,
Druckman A, Jackson TD (2010) Carbon Footprint of UK households,
Jackson TD (2011) Has Western Capitalism failed?, World Service's Busimess Daily programme
Jackson TD (2009) Recovery without Growth?,Renewal 17 (3) pp. 43-56
Jackson TD (2013) Opinion-Moving to a Green Economy, pp. 24-25 Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC
Dickinson J, Jackson T, Matthews M, Cripps A (2007) The economic and environmental optimisation of integrating ground source energy systems into buildings,ECOS 2007 - Proceedings of the 20th International Conference on Efficiency, Cost, Optimization, Simulation and Environmental Impact of Energy Systems 1 pp. 603-610
There are two main drivers for the consideration of ground source energy systems in the built environment in the UK today. Firstly, to reduce the operational costs of the provision of space heating and cooling and, secondly, to reduce the carbon dioxide emissions of the building. Building occupiers and owners are becoming increasingly concerned at rising energy prices and are seeking alternatives to conventional systems to reduce the running costs of buildings. Building designers, due to European and national legislation, are also required to reduce the operational CO2 emissions from new and existing buildings. The capital costs for closed loop ground source heat pump systems are often found to be unattractive versus conventional approaches and low carbon alternatives. This paper will consider the optimisation of maximising the operational benefits whilst minimising the capital installation costs of closed loop ground source heating and cooling systems. Bivalent (dual fuel) heating and cooling systems offer a way to reduce the installation costs but also still provide considerable economic and environmental savings. A study example is presented for a newly proposed Academy (school) in the UK. The results of the study show a >40% reduction in the capital cost versus a peak sized GSHP systems whilst still providing >70% of the respective economic savings and CO2 reduction.
Druckman A, Chitnis M, Sorrell S, Jackson T (2012) Corrigendum to "Missing carbon reductions? Exploring rebound and backfire effects in UK households" [Energy Policy 39 (2011) 3572-3581], Energy Policy 49
Bailey PD, Jackson T, Parkinson S, Begg KG (2001) Searching for baselines constructing joint implementation project emission reductions,GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE-HUMAN AND POLICY DIMENSIONS 11 (3) pp. 185-192 ELSEVIER SCI LTD
Jackson TD (2014) New Economy, In: D?Alisa G, Demaria F, Kallis G (eds.), Degrowth: A Vocabulary for a New Era 42 Routledge
Uzzell D, Muckle R, Jackson T, Ogden J, Barnett J, Gatersleben B, Hegarty P, Papathanasopoulou E (2006) Choice Matters: Alternative Approaches to Encourage Sustainable Consumption and Production, Report to Department of the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Jackson TD, Victor P (2013) Green Economy at a community scale,In: Green Economy at a community scale Metcalf Foundation
Druckman A, Sinclair P, Jackson T (2008) A geographically and socio-economically disaggregated local household consumption model for the UK,JOURNAL OF CLEANER PRODUCTION 16 (7) pp. 870-880 ELSEVIER SCI LTD
Jackson T (2015) If the rich world aimed for minimal growth, would it be a disaster or a blessing?, The Economist
Geyer R, Jackson T, Clift R (2002) Economic and environmental comparison between recycling and reuse of structural steel sections, STEEL IN SUSTAINABLE CONSTRUCTION: IISI WORLD CONFERENCE 2002, CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS pp. 13-18 INT IRON AND STEEL INST
Oliver M, Jackson T (2000) The evolution of economic and environmental cost for crystalline silicon photovoltaics,ENERGY POLICY 28 (14) pp. 1011-1021 ELSEVIER SCI LTD
Abbas K, Christie I, Demassieux F, Hayward B, Jackson TD, Pierre F (2013) Sustainable consumption and lifestyles? Children and youth in cities., In: ISSC, UNESCO (eds.), World social science report 2013: Changing Global Environments
Thomas Pellicer R, Jackson TD (2009) Reconstructing Cultures of Sustainable Consumption: towards a deconstruction of the global polity., In: Datta Banik S, Kumar Basu S (eds.), Environmental Challenges of the 21st Century. pp. 271-343 APH Publishing Corporation
McLaren J, Parkinson S, Jackson T (2000) Modelling material cascades - frameworks for the environmental assessment of recycling systems,RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND RECYCLING 31 (1) pp. 83-104 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Jackson TD (2011) Wir Unersattlichen, 44 Die Zeit
Hogg N, Jackson T (2008) Digital Media and Dematerialization: An Exploration of the Potential for Reduced Material Intensity in Music Delivery, Journal of Industrial Ecology 13 (1)
Jackson TD (2011) Die Droge Wachstum, I/2011 pp. 18-23 KULTURAUSTAUSCH - Zeitchrift für internationale Beziehungen
Jackson TD (2011) The political economy of the UNFCCC: negotiating consensus within the capitalist world system, RESOLVE Working Paper Series 02-11
Alexander C, Druckman A, Jackson T, Osinski C (2009) Estimating household material flows in deprived areas, Proceedings of Institution of Civil Engineers: Waste and Resource Management 162 (WR3) pp. 129-139
As a first step to understanding household material flows
and waste arisings, a detailed picture of household
consumption is required. This task is particularly
problematic for local areas such as deprived inner-city
housing estates that are under-represented in national
surveys. This paper describes two methodologies for
assessing household expenditure as a consumption proxy
and applies them to such an area. The first is a top-down
approach using national datasets to model household
expenditure at high levels of socio-economic and
geographical disaggregation. The second method is a
bottom-up approach in which a sample of household
expenditure diaries was collected, augmented by a variety
of qualitative techniques to gain a detailed picture of
household practices. The results from the two
methodologies showed marked discrepancies: locally
collected data demonstrate a higher degree of variability
than modelled results based on aggregate data. It is
suggested that neither approach is ?right? or ?wrong?, but
that the two methodologies serve different purposes. Use
of top-down modelled data is pragmatic and affordable for
use by administrative or commercial bodies. However,
without recognition of the localised volatility revealed by
the bottom-up method, it is unlikely that realistic and
efficient collection strategies can be devised.
Jackson T, Victor P (2011) Productivity and work in the 'green economy': Some theoretical reflections and empirical tests, Environmental Innovation and Societal Transitions 1 (1) pp. 101-108
Constanza R, Alperovitz G, Daly HE, Farley J, Franco C, Jackson TD, Kubiszewski I, Schor J, Victor P (2012) Building a sustainable and desirable Economy-in-Society-in-Nature.,In: Report to the United Nations for the 2012 Rio+20 Conference as part of the Sustainable Development in the 21st century (SD21) project implemented by the Division for Sustainable Development of the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs The Division for Sustainable Development of the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs
Peacock A, Banfill P, Turan S, Jenkins D, Ahadzi M, Bowles G, Kane D, Newborough M, Eames P, Singh H, Jackson TD, Berry A (2007) Reducing CO2 Emissions through refurbishment of UK housing. Energy Markets and Sustainability in a Larger Europe. ECEEE.,
Geyer R, Davis J, Ley J, Kwan A, He J, Clift R, Jackson T, Sansom M (2007) Time-dependent material flow analysis of iron and steel in the UK. Part 1: Production and consumption trends 1970-2000, Resources, Conservation and Recycling 51 (1) pp. 101-117
This paper presents a detailed account of the supply chain for iron and steel in the UK, using material flow analysis. Due to the lack of a universally agreed methodology of material flow analysis, we include an explanation of the accounting methodology employed in the study. Data for the supply chain has been collected reaching back three decades, enabling analysis of trends in production and consumption of iron and steel over the years. This first part of a series of two papers quantifies the iron and steel flows through the UK economy including the annual amount of iron and steel embodied in all final goods that enter the use phase in the UK. The second part explores the more elusive flows of scrap generation and recycling. In this first paper we show that the UK no longer has the capacity to recycle the scrap it collects and is increasingly relying on foreign economies to do so. We also observe that trade in iron and steel products and ferrous metal containing final goods has increased dramatically over the years, but remained relatively balanced. Today, one-half of UK's iron and steel production is exported, whereas one-half of the iron and steel entering the UK use phase comes from imported final goods. The efficiency with which the UK iron and steel industry transforms iron ore and scrap into iron and steel products has increased substantially. However, there is no significant downward trend in the absolute level of iron and steel use in the UK. Between 1970 and 1981 the annual amount of steel put to use dropped from 16.4 to 10.7 million metric tonnes but climbed back up to 15 million metric tonnes twice since then 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Jackson TD (2008) Sustainable Consumption and Lifestyle Change., In: Lewis A (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Psychology and Economic Behaviour pp. 335-362 Cambridge University Press
14. Sustainable. consumption. and. lifestyle. change. TIM JACKSON 14.1 Introduction Amongst the mostfirmlyhelddesiderata ofmodernliberal society isthe notion of individual freedom of choice. It seems almost sacrilegious for governments to ...
Evans D, Jackson TD (2007) Towards a Sociology of Sustainable Lifestyles, RESOLVE Working Paper Series 03-07 University of Surrey
Jackson T (2002) Evolutionary psychology in ecological economics: consilience, consumption and contentment,ECOLOGICAL ECONOMICS 41 (2) PII S0921- pp. 289-303 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Jackson TD (2012) Vision?, SOL-Kalender 2012 (Sol Zeitschrift fur Solidarität, Ökologie und Lebensstil).
Druckman A, Jackson T (2008) Measuring resource inequalities: The concepts and methodology for an area-based Gini coefficient,ECOLOGICAL ECONOMICS 65 (2) pp. 242-252 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Jackson TD (2012) RE-modelando Desde El Bien Comon - Tim Jackson Recoloca Paradigmas, 39 pp. 28-31 Opciones
Abdallah S, Knuutila A, Jackson TD, Marks N (2010) The 2009 R-ISEW (Regional Index of Sustainable Economic Well-being) for all the English Regions,
Druckman A, Jackson TD (2009) The delights of data: deficiencies in the quagmire?,
Shaw R, Attree M, Jackson TD, Kay M (2007) Reducing Distribution Losses by Delaying Peak Demand: a case study for domestic (unrestricted)consumers in the United Utilities region. 19th International Conference on Electricity Distribution. CIRED,
Davis J, Geyer R, Ley J, He J, Clift R, Kwan A, Sansom M, Jackson T (2007) Time-dependent material flow analysis of iron and steel in the UK. Part 2. Scrap generation and recycling, Resources, Conservation and Recycling 51 (1) pp. 118-140
This paper presents an analysis of the use of iron and steel in the UK and explores how much of the iron and steel is recycled when it becomes obsolete after use. The first part of this paper series investigated production and consumption trends of iron and steel in the UK, whereas this paper focuses on scrap generation and recycling. Information on the amounts of iron and steel going into different groups of goods, together with values for their estimated lifetimes, have enabled modelling of the annual release of iron and steel from the use phase in the form of end-of-life scrap. This is an application to material flow accounting of the theory of residence time distributions used routinely in chemical reaction engineering. By comparing modelled generation of scrap with actual scrap consumption in the UK, we obtain estimates of loss or accumulation of iron and steel scrap in the UK. The model indicates that as much as 30% of the scrap that was potentially available in 2001 as end-of-life scrap has either been accumulated within the economic system or lost to landfill. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Dresner S, Jackson T, Gilbert N (2006) History and social responses to environmental tax reform in the United Kingdom, ENERGY POLICY 34 (8) pp. 930-939 ELSEVIER SCI LTD
Jackson T (2006) Obituary: Gerald Leach, ENERGY POLICY 34 (1) pp. 1-1
Jackson TD, Victor P, Asjad Naqvi A (2015) Towards a Stock-Flow Consistent Ecological Macroeconomics, PASSAGE
Modern western economies (in the Eurozone and elsewhere) face a number of challenges over the
coming decades. Achieving full employment, meeting climate change and other key environmental
targets, and reducing inequality rank amongst the highest of these. The conventional route to
achieving these goals has been to pursue economic growth. But this route has created two critical
problems for modern economies. The first is that higher growth leads (ceteris parabis) to higher
environmental impact. The second is that fragility in financial balances has accompanied relentless
demand expansion. The prevailing global response to the first problem has been to encourage a decoupling of output
from impacts by investing in green technologies (green growth). But this response runs the risk of
exacerbating problems associated with the over-leveraging of households, firms and governments
and places undue confidence in unproven and imagined technologies. An alternative approach is to
reduce the pace of growth and to restructure economies around green services (post-growth). But
the potential dangers of declining growth rates lie in increased inequality and in rising
unemployment. Some more fundamental arguments have also been made against the feasibility of
interest-bearing debt within a post-growth economy. The work described in this paper was motivated by the need to address these fundamental
dilemmas and to inform the debate that has emerged in recent years about the relative merits of
green growth and post-growth scenarios. In pursuit of this aim we have developed a suite of
macroeconomic models based on the methodology of Post-Keynesian Stock Flow Consistent (SFC)
system dynamics. Taken together these models represent the first steps in constructing a new
macroeconomic synthesis capable of exploring the economic and financial dimensions of an
economy confronting resource or environmental constraints. Such an ecological macroeconomics
includes an account of basic macroeconomic variables such as the GDP, consumption, investment,
saving, public spending, employment, and productivity. It also accounts for the performance of the
economy in terms of financial balances, net lending positions, money supply, distributional equity
and financial stability. This report illustrates the utility of this new approach through a number of specific analyses and
scenario explorations. These include an assessment of the Piketty hypothesis (that slow growth
inc
Peters M, Fudge S, Jackson T (2010) Low carbon communities: Imaginative approaches to combating climate change locally, Low Carbon Communities: Imaginative Approaches to Combating Climate Change Locally
'We are faced with the greatest challenge to public engagement since World War Two, and a new discourse of fear - not military invasion but climate change. At the same time most people cannot grasp the scale of the challenge nor what they are supposed to do about it. Good governance requires an informed citizenry who are much more than consumers and customers, but active participants in a new post-carbon politics. Low Carbon Communities helps to set out the political and cultural agenda for the first half of the twenty-first century and, ultimately, the imaginative approaches that are required now to address climate change.' © Anastassios Gentzoglanis and Anders Henten 2010. All rights reserved.
Druckman A, Jackson TD (2009) The bare necessities: how much carbon do we really need?,
Jackson TD (2012) Prosperite sans croissance : comment faire, 31 Constructif
Bradley P, Thomas C, Druckman A, Jackson T (2009) Accounting for food waste: Comparative analysis within the UK, Proceedings of Institution of Civil Engineers: Waste and Resource Management 162 (1) pp. 5-13
Papathanasopoulou E, Jackson T (2009) Measuring fossil resource inequality-A case study for the UK between 1968 and 2000, ECOLOGICAL ECONOMICS 68 (4) pp. 1213-1225 ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Jackson TD (2013) Developing an Ecological Macroeconomics, Centre for International Governance Innovation
Shaw R, Attree M, Jackson T, Kay M (2009) The value of reducing distribution losses by domestic load-shifting: a network perspective, ENERGY POLICY 37 (8) pp. 3159-3167 ELSEVIER SCI LTD
Jackson TD, Victor P (2015) Credit creation and the ?growth imperative?. A quasi-stationary economy with debt-based money, PASSAGE
This paper addresses the question of whether a capitalist economy with interest-bearing money can ever sustain a ?stationary? (or non-growing) state, or whether, as often claimed, capitalism has an inherent ?growth imperative? which arises from the creation of money as interest-bearing debt. We outline the development of a dedicated system dynamics model for describing Financial Assets and Liabilities in a Stock-Flow consistent Framework (FALSTAFF) and use this model to explore the potential for stationary state outcomes in an economy with balanced trade, debt-based money, and private equity. Contrary to claims in the literature, we find that neither credit creation nor the charging of interest on debt create a ?growth imperative? in and of themselves. We show further that it is possible to move from a growth path towards a stationary state without either crashing the economy or dismantling the system. Our model supports critiques of austerity and underlines the value of countercyclical spending by government. Nonetheless, there remain several good reasons to support the reform of the monetary system.
Bedford T, Burningham K, Cooper G, Green N, Jackson TD (2011) Sustainable leisure: escalations, constraints and implications, RESOLVE Working Paper Series 12-11
Cooper G, Green N, Burningham K, Evans D, Jackson T (2012) Unravelling the threads: discourses of sustainability and consumption in an online forum, Environmental Communication 6 (1) pp. 101-118 Taylor & Francis
This paper analyzes an online discussion that followed an article published by UK environmental activist and journalist George Monbiot (2007) in The Guardian online newspaper. The analysis addresses the ways in which participants in an online forum debate responded to the tensions and contradictions between lifestyle, consumption and sustainability highlighted in the original article. The discursive construction of class, green political orientations and identities, visions of ?the good life?, and appeals to religion and science, are highlighted throughout the analysis ? as are the discursive strategies for positioning self, other and audience in the debate. The argument emphasizes the heterogeneity of discursive positioning, and reflects on the role of social media in the politics of consumption and sustainability, especially given the inherent reflexivity of web forums as online communicative forms.

Keywords: lifestyle; sustainability; consumption; online forums; Web 2.0

Mulugetta Y, Jackson T, van der Horst D (2010) Carbon reduction at community scale, ENERGY POLICY 38 (12) pp. 7541-7545 ELSEVIER SCI LTD
Druckman A, Jackson TD (2009) The carbon footprint of the UK: Exploring its trends and drivers using a quasi-multi-regional input-output model., RSRC Stakeholder Seminar on Accounting for and Modelling the Pollution Content of Trade Flows, Carbon Footprints and other Indicators of Sustainable Development.
Jackson TD (2009) Prosperity Without Growth? The transition to a sustainable economy., In: Prosperity Without Growth? The transition to a sustainable economy.
Jackson TD (2015) Growth is not the answer to inequality, The Guardian
Pepper M, Jackson T, Uzzell D (2010) A Study of Multidimensional Religion Constructs and Values in the United Kingdom,Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 49 (1) pp. 127-146 WILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC
A growing number of studies have systematically examined the relationships between religiousness and value priorities. However, few studies have utilized multidimensional constructs of religiousness or attempted to distinguish among the value priorities of the religious. Using a general public sample and a churchgoer sample in the United Kingdom, this article examines the associations between Schwartz's values, several general religion measures, and conceptualization of God. Religiousness aligns most strongly along the conservation/openness to change value dimension, and spirituality is rotated further toward self-transcendence values. Findings suggest a shift among the religious away from an emphasis on security. God concepts are uniquely related to some value types. Particularly among the churchgoers, for whom God concepts may be especially formative, characteristics attributed to God are reflected in value priorities. These findings support the theoretical assertion that conceptualization of God is a foundational religious belief implicated in more specific values, attitudes, and beliefs.
This paper explores the hypothesis that slow growth rates lead to rising inequality. This case has been made most notably by French economist Thomas Piketty. If true, this hypothesis would pose serious challenges to the project of achieving Prosperity without Growth or meeting the ambitions of those who call for an intentional slowing down of growth on
ecological grounds. The paper describes a simple four-sector, demand-­driven model of Savings, Inequality and Growth in a MAcroeconomic framework
(SIGMA) with exogenous growth and net savings rates. SIGMA is used to examine the evolution of inequality in the context of declining economic growth. Contrary to the general hypothesis, we find that inequality does not necessarily increase as
growth slows down. In fact, there are certain conditions under which inequality can be reduced
significantly, or even entirely eliminated, as growth declines. The paper discusses the implications of this finding for questions of employment, government policy and the politics of de-­growth.
Thomson J, Jackson T (2007) Sustainable procurement in practice: Lessons from local government, JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT 50 (3) pp. 421-444 ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD
Jackson TD (2010) Prosperite sans Croissance - la transition vers une economie durable,
Jackson TD, Drake B, Victor P, Kratena K, Sommer M (2014) Foundations for an Ecological Macroeconomics: literature review and model development., WWWforEurope Workin gPaper no.65
Druckman A, Jackson T (2015) Understanding Households as Drivers of Carbon Emissions,In: Clift R, Druckman A (eds.), Taking Stock of Industrial Ecology Springer
Pepper M, Jackson T, Uzzell D (2011) An Examination of Christianity and Socially Conscious and Frugal Consumer Behaviors, ENVIRONMENT AND BEHAVIOR 43 (2) pp. 274-290 SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC
Pepper M, Jackson T, Uzzell D (2009) An examination of the values that motivate socially conscious and frugal consumer behaviours, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CONSUMER STUDIES 33 (2) pp. 126-136 WILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC
Mulugetta Y, Nhete T, Jackson T (2000) Photovoltaics in Zimbabwe: lessons from the GEF solar project,ENERGY POLICY 28 (14) pp. 1069-1080 ELSEVIER SCI LTD
Jackson TD, Papathanasopoulou E, Bradley P, Druckman A (2007) Attributing UK Carbon Emissions To Functional Consumer Needs: Methodology and Pilot Results, RESOLVE Working Paper Series 01-07 University of Surrey
Kubiszewski I, Costanza R, Franco C, Lawn P, Talberth J, Jackson T, Aylmer C (2013) Beyond GDP: Measuring and achieving global genuine progress, Ecological Economics 93 pp. 57-68
While global Gross Domestic Product (GDP) has increased more than three-fold since 1950, economic welfare, as estimated by the Genuine Progress Indicator (GPI), has actually decreased since 1978. We synthesized estimates of GPI over the 1950-2003 time period for 17 countries for which GPI has been estimated. These 17 countries contain 53% of the global population and 59% of the global GDP. We compared GPI with Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Human Development Index (HDI), Ecological Footprint, Biocapacity, Gini coefficient, and Life Satisfaction scores. Results show a significant variation among these countries, but some major trends. We also estimated a global GPI/capita over the 1950-2003 period. Global GPI/capita peaked in 1978, about the same time that global Ecological Footprint exceeded global Biocapacity. Life Satisfaction in almost all countries has also not improved significantly since 1975. Globally, GPI/capita does not increase beyond a GDP/capita of around $7000/capita. If we distributed income more equitably around the planet, the current world GDP ($67. trillion/yr) could support 9.6. billion people at $7000/capita. While GPI is not the perfect economic welfare indicator, it is a far better approximation than GDP. Development policies need to shift to better account for real welfare and not merely GDP growth. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.
Bedford T, Collingwood P, Darnton A, Evans D, Gatersleben B, Abrahamse W, Jackson TD (2009) Motivations for Pro-Environmental Behaviour., A research report completed for the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Druckman A, Jackson T (2010) The bare necessities: How much household carbon do we really need?, Ecological Economics 69 (9) pp. 1794-1804
The consumption patterns of Western nations are generally deemed to be unsustainable. Yet there is little attempt to restrain either material throughput or income growth. Nonetheless, in the face of the need to make 'deep' cuts in carbon emissions (for instance), consumption restraint may be a perfectly legitimate response. This paper explores the potential for a Reduced Consumption Scenario in the UK constructed by assuming that households achieve a specific 'minimum income standard' which is deemed to provide a decent life for each household type. The minimum income standards are taken from a recent study for the Joseph Rowntree Foundation and include not only subsistence commodities such as food, warmth and shelter but also the means to participate effectively in society. The Joseph Rowntree Foundation study produced detailed household expenditure budgets for these income standards. The paper uses an environmentally extended Quasi-Multi-Regional Input-Output model to estimate the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions required in the production and distribution of all goods and services purchased according to these budgets. Our results show that average household GHG emissions in the UK would be around 37% lower in the Reduced Consumption Scenario than they are currently. We explore several implications of these findings including: the need to change social norms around consumption, the need for investment to improve the thermal performance of homes and the need to develop new transport infrastructures. We also address the potential to reduce emissions below the level achieved in this Scenario and discuss the implications for policy. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.
Jackson TD (2012) Wachstum rettet uns nicht, Der Tagesspiegel
Jackson TD (2009) Beyond the Growth Economy.,Journal of Industrial Ecology 13 (4) pp. 487-490
Uzzell D, Jackson T, Pepper M (2006) Environmentalism in churches: attitudes and behaviours of UK Christians,
Shaw R, Attree M, Jackson T (2010) Developing electricity distribution networks and their regulation to support sustainable energy, ENERGY POLICY 38 (10) pp. 5927-5937 ELSEVIER SCI LTD
Jackson TD (2007) Plane Stupidity? What we think about giving up flying, Britain in 2008 Economic and Social Research Council
Hayward B, Jackson TD, Aoyagri-Usui M (2010) Beyond happiness: understanding freedom, agency and optionality in the sustainable lifestyle visions of young people in Japan, New Zealand and the United Kingdom,
Jackson TD (2008) The Challenge of Sustainable Lifestyles,In: Institute W, Gardner G, Prugh T (eds.), State of the World 2008. Innovations for a Sustainable Economy 4 pp. 45-60 Routledge
Dr. Tim Jackson is Professor of Sustainable Development at the University of Surrey in the ...
Jackson TD (2013) Where is the "Wellbeing Dividend"? Nature, Structure and Consumption Inequalities.,In: Victor P (eds.), The Costs of Economic Growth
Pierre F, Fadeeva Z, Ogbuigwe A, Jackson TD, Mattar H, Pedrina L (2011) Visions for change: recommendations for effective policies on sustainable lifestyles., In: Based on the Global Survey on Sustainable Lifestyles United Nations Environment Programme
Mulugetta Y, Mantajit N, Jackson T (2007) Power sector scenarios for Thailand: An exploratory analysis 2002-2022, ENERGY POLICY 35 (6) pp. 3256-3269 ELSEVIER SCI LTD
Bedford T, Collingwood C, Darnton A, Evans D, Gatersleben B, Abrahamse W, Jackson TD (2010) Motivations for pro-environmental behaviour, DEFRA
Jackson T (2002) Materials matter: Toward a sustainable materials policy,NATURE 415 (6870) pp. 367-368 NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP
Druckman A, Jackson TD (2009) Where does all the carbon go? Mapping carbon lifestyles.,
Bedford T, Burningham K, Cooper G, Green N, Jackson TD (2011) Low Carbon Leisure., Britain in 2012 11 Economic and Social Research Council
Jackson TD (2012) Let's be less productive, New York Times
Fudge S, Peters M, Mulugetta Y, Jackson T (2011) Paradigms, Policy and Governance: The Politics of Energy Regulation in the UK Post-2000, Environmental Policy and Governance 21 (4) pp. 291-302
This paper considers the debate around energy policy and government regulation in the UK, considering Helm's idea that the current period can be conceptualized as a distinct ideological paradigm in the same way that both nationalization and privatization were enmeshed within particular political and economic goals. As he reasons, the first paradigm was based on nationalization and had the purpose of bringing vital services under public ownership and the second paradigm was constructed around the premises of liberalization and privatization. Drawing on the work of Mitchell, the paper explores Helm's observations on the link between ?paradigms and policy? to suggest that the failings of a market-based approach to addressing climate change and energy security argue that a more radical shift in direction and thinking is needed. In particular, it is argued that the UK Government's more recent targets on reducing carbon emissions suggest the need for an energy policy agenda that is more clearly de-linked from the current emphasis on market solutions and associated political thinking. It is argued that such a transition in policy would need to revolve around Kuhn's pre-conditions of a ?gestalt switch? ? as indicated in both previous UK regulatory approaches to energy. We suggest that, in much the same way as the dominant scientific consensus structured Kuhn's original conception of a paradigm, such a shift in policy will involve a ?gestalt switch?, and a politically led shift away from the influence of thinking which currently remains rooted in previous infrastructural and ideological legacies.
Jackson T (2011) Reviewing the research: Report of the commission on the measurement of economic performance and social progress, Environment 53 (1) pp. 38-40
Druckman A, Chitnis M, Jackson T, Sorrell S (2012) Corrigendum to "Missing carbon reductions? Exploring rebound and backfire effects in UK households" [Energy Policy 39 (2011) 3572-3581] (DOI:10.1016/j.enpol.2011.03.058), Energy Policy
Jackson TD (2008) A blatant failure of moral vision., Guardian S2 Environment
Jackson TD (2011) Confronting consumption: challenges for economics and for policy., In: Michie J, Oughton C, Oughton C (eds.), The Political Economy of the Environment: an Interdisciplinary approach. pp. 189-212 Routledge
Druckman A, Bradley P, Papathanasopoulou E, Jackson TD (2007) Measuring progress towards Carbon Reduction in the UK. Paper presented to the International Ecological Footprint Conference.,
Victor P, Jackson TD (2013) Developing a Demographic Sub-Model and Input-Output Structure for the Green Economy Macro-Model and Accounts (GEMMA) Framework, Final report.,In: Output Structure for the Green Economy Macro-Model and Accounts (GEMMA) Framework, Final report. CIGI-INET
Jackson TD, Porritt J, Lees A, Anderson V (2009) A Sustainable New Deal - a fiscal package for economic social and environmental recovery., London: Sustainable Development Comission
Bradley P, Druckman A, Jackson TD (2013) The development of commercial local area resource and emissions modelling - navigating towards new perspectives and applications,Journal of Cleaner Production 42 pp. 241-253 Elsevier
Meeting near future UK greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions targets will require all parts of the UK economy to contribute, and in particular significant changes in business practices are required at the local level. From review it was found that there is a lack of detailed business accounting and reporting of GHG emissions at the local level, especially concerning supply chain impacts and small and medium sized enterprises. This paper presents a framework model to generate detailed benchmark estimates of GHGs (both on site and supply chain related) for individual businesses and all businesses of a sector within an area. The model makes use of available economic and environmental data, and, with similar datasets existing in other parts of the world, such models may be used elsewhere. The framework model is applied to an empirical case study. Estimates from such a framework can be used in a step-by-step approach to move businesses and local areas towards improved accounting, reporting and sustainability (including procurement). The model makes use of two different accounting perspectives: the production perspective (on site GHGs) and the provision perspective (supply chain GHGs attributable to purchased inputs of a business or sectors production). The new provision perspective and its consequences are explored and explained.
Mair Simon, Druckman Angela, Jackson Timothy (2017) Investigating fairness in global supply chains: applying an extension of the living wage to the Western European clothing supply chain,The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment 23 pp. 1862-1873 Springer Verlag
Purpose

This paper explores the issue of fairness in global supply chains. Taking the Western European clothing supply chain as a case study, we demonstrate how applying a normative indicator in Social Life Cycle Assessment (SLCA) can contribute academic and practical insights into debates on fairness. To do so, we develop a new indicator that addresses some of the limitations of the living wage for SLCA.

Methods

We extend the standard form of living wage available for developing countries to include income tax and social security contributions. We call this extension ?living labour compensation?. Using publically available data, we estimate net living wages, gross living wages, and living labour compensation rates for Brazil, Russia, India, and China (BRIC) in 2005. We then integrate living labour compensation rates into an input-output framework, which we use to compare living labour compensation and actual labour compensation in the BRIC countries in the Western European clothing supply chain in 2005.

Results and discussion

We find that in 2005, actual labour compensation in the Western European clothing supply chain was around half of the living labour compensation level, with the greatest difference being in the Agricultural sector. Therefore, we argue that BRIC pay in the Western European clothing supply chain was unfair. Furthermore, our living labour compensation estimates for BRIC in 2005 are ~ 35% higher than standard living wage estimates. Indeed, adding income taxes and employee social security contributions alone increases the living wage by ~ 10%. Consequently, we argue there is a risk that investigations based on living wages are not using a representative measure of fairness from the employee?s perspective and are substantially underestimating the cost of living wages from an employer?s perspective. Finally, we discuss implications for retailers and living wage advocacy groups.

Conclusions

Living labour compensation extends the living wage, maintaining its strengths and addressing key weaknesses. It can be estimated for multiple countries from publically available data and can be applied in an input-output framework. Therefore, it is able to provide a normative assessment of fairness in complex global supply chains. Applying it to the Western European clothing supply chain, we were able to show that pay for workers in Brazil, Russia, India, and China is unfair, and draw substantive conclusions for practice.

Gatersleben Birgitta, White Emma, Abrahamse W, Jackson Timothy, Uzzell David (2010) Values and sustainable lifestyles,Architectural Science Review 53 (1) pp. 37-50 Routledge, Taylor & Francis
With ever-increasing concerns about the consequences of climate change, households are an important focus for change. There is increasing pressure on households to change lifestyles and adopt behaviours that require less energy and natural resources. At the same time, retailers and producers of consumer goods aim to persuade people to consume more through commercial advertisements. Social science research examining sustainable behaviours often fails to examine the relative influence of both environmental concern and materialism simultaneously. Moreover, most of this research focuses on explaining or promoting behaviours with pro-environmental intent, thereby ignoring many consumer behaviours that may have a significant environmental impact. This article aims to address some of these shortcomings by examining the relationships between materialistic and environmental values and different consumer behaviours. Survey data from 194 individuals from 99 households were analysed. The findings show that quite a number of people express both relatively high levels of environmental concern and relatively high levels of materialism simultaneously. Moreover, materialism and environmental concern appear to be related to different types of behaviours. This raises important questions for the promotion of sustainable lifestyles, which may need to address not only environmental concerns but also materialistic concerns.
The Sustainable Development Goals are a high level development plan for a world free of poverty, with decent work for all and less environmentally damaging patterns of production and consumption. This thesis explores whether paying living wages to Brazilian, Russian, Indian and Chinese (BRIC) workers in the Western European clothing supply chain could contribute towards the realisation of the Sustainable Development Goals.

This thesis principally uses two modelling frameworks. A global multi-regional input-output framework, extended to enable assessment of fairness in global supply chains, and a system dynamics model of the Western European clothing supply chain. This allows us to explore both the different ways in which clothing retailers might be able to pay for a living wage in their supply chains and associated sustainability impacts.

Our analysis makes three key contributions. (1) Empirical evidence suggesting that in the Western European clothing supply chain, consumption drives environmental impact, and BRIC wages are ?unfair? and unable to support a ?decent? quality of life. (2) Extension of the limited evidence base on the employment effects of living wages in developing countries. We point to a potentially powerful employment multiplier effect (which may mean that living wages increase employment). However, we also suggest that productivity gains following wage increases could exacerbate job losses. (3) Mixed evidence on the environmental impacts of paying a supply chain living wage. While this is likely to marginally reduce the environmental impacts of affluent country consumption our findings also suggest that global environmental impacts could rise due to increased developing country consumption.

Based on these findings, we argue that paying a living wage to those developing country workers employed in affluent country supply chains could contribute to a more sustainable world by reducing poverty and improving working conditions. We further argue that the risk of increased total environmental damage could be minimised through investment in more sustainable infrastructure in developing countries themselves, and we also highlight the need for additional reductions in the environmental impacts of affluent country consumption, beyond supply chain living wage initiatives. Finally, we suggest that efforts to move to craft based production methods could be used to resist labour productivity growth, minimising the risk of job losses.

Gatersleben Birgitta, Jackson Tim, Meadows Jesse, Soto Elena, Yang Ying (Lily) (2018) Leisure, materialism, wellbeing and the environment,European Review of Applied Psychology / Revue Européenne de Psychologie Appliquée 68 (3) pp. 131-139 Elsevier

Introduction

There are increasing concerns that people in modern societies spend too much of their leisure time on activities such as shopping and watching television and that this undermines human wellbeing and damages the environment.

Objectives

This paper explores the relationships between materialism, environmental values and life satisfaction on the one hand, and different forms of leisure activities on the other. In particular, it addresses the differences between serious or intrinsically motivating leisure activities and casual or extrinsically motivating activities.

Method

Three survey studies were conducted among 16 to 25 year olds in the UK (n = 338), Spain (n = 417) and China (n = 961).

Results

Reading books was negatively related to materialism and positively to environmental values and behaviours. Playing sports was associated with higher wellbeing. Moreover, materialism was negatively associated with environmental values and behaviour. Life satisfaction was higher among those with stronger environmental values and weaker materialism.

Conclusion

The findings suggest that sustainable lifestyles, characterised by higher wellbeing, higher environmental concern and behaviour and lower materialism can be found in each nation. Moreover, such lifestyles are associated with different kinds of leisure engagement. Examining the potentially positive role of reading books rather than being immersed in screen time deserves further attention.

Burningham Kate, Venn Susan, Christie Ian, Jackson Timothy, Gatersleben Birgitta (2014) New motherhood: a moment of change in everyday shopping practices,Young Consumers 15 (3) pp. 211-226 Emerald Publishers
Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to draw on data from 16 interviews (two each with eight women) to explore some of the ways in which everyday shopping may change as women become mothers. The meanings, practices and implications of the transition to motherhood have long been a topic for sociological inquiry. Recently, interest has turned to the opportunities offered by this transition for the adoption of more sustainable lifestyles. Becoming a mother is likely to lead to changes in a variety of aspects of everyday life such as travel, leisure, cooking and purchase of consumer goods, all of which have environmental implications. The environmental impacts associated with such changes are complex, and positive moves toward more sustainable activities in one sphere may be offset by less environmentally positive changes elsewhere.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on data from 16 interviews (two each with eight women) to explore some of the ways in which everyday shopping may change as women become mothers.

Findings

This paper focuses on the ways in which modes and meanings of everyday shopping may shift through the transition to mother, and on indicating any potential sustainability implications. The paper explores the adoption of more structured shopping and of shifting the mode of grocery shopping online or offline. The paper draws attention to the way in which practices are embedded and interrelated and argue that more consideration needs to be given to the influence of all household members.

Originality/value

The question here is not whether women purchase different products or consume more once they have a child, but rather how does the everyday activity of shopping for groceries and the meanings it has change with new motherhood and what sustainability implications might this have? In this context, this paper provides a novel addition to research on new mothers and consumption.

Mair Simon, Druckman Angela, Jackson Tim (2019) Higher Wages for Sustainable Development? Employment and Carbon Effects of Paying a Living Wage in Global Apparel Supply Chains,Ecological Economics 159 pp. 11-23 Elsevier
In this paper we explore how paying a living wage in global supply chains might affect employment and carbon emissions: Sustainable Development Goals 8 and 13. Previous work has advocated using wage increases for poorer workers to increase prices for wealthier consumers, thereby reducing consumption and associated environmental damage. However, the likely effects of such an approach remain unclear. Using an input-output framework extended with income and demand elasticities, we estimate the employment and carbon effects of paying a living wage to Brazilian, Russian, Indian and Chinese (BRIC) workers in the Western European clothing supply chain. We find negligible effects on carbon emissions but a substantial increase in BRIC employment under 3 scenarios of consumer behaviour. Changes in Western European consumption lead to small decreases in global carbon emissions and BRIC employment. However, the increase in BRIC wages increases demand in BRIC. This increased demand increases production which largely cancels out the carbon savings and generates net increases in BRIC employment. We conclude by arguing that paying higher wages in global supply chains represents a good but not sufficient step toward achieving the Sustainable Development Goals.
This dissertation presents a stock-flow consistent (SFC) model with an integrated input-output (IO) model for the study of the economic mechanisms by which capital assets might be stranded in the fossil fuel extraction and energy generation sectors. It assesses the major macroeconomic and financial implications of both capital asset stranding in these sectors and different transitions to a low carbon economy. The model is that of a pure credit economy that consists of three firm sectors, two household sectors and a banking sector. The three firm sectors are a fossil fuel energy sector (the ?brown? sector), a renewable energy sector (the ?green? sector), and a firm sector that produces non-energy goods (the ?other? sector). The two household sectors are an ?ethical? household sector and a ?normal? household sector.
The model is used to investigate a number of claims from the stranded assets literature regarding the effects of different types of transitions to a low carbon economy (slow, fast, anticipated and unanticipated) and different changes in market conditions (due to changes in policy, financing conditions, technology or social norms). The results of the transition simulations support a number of the arguments made in the stranded assets literature, namely that faster transitions and unanticipated transitions are likely to strand more assets and have more disruptive effects on financial markets than slower transitions and anticipated transitions. The results of the market conditions simulations suggest that changes in market conditions that affect the real side of the economy are likely to lead to larger effects on demand and asset stranding than changes in market conditions that primarily affect firms? borrowing costs. In addition, these simulations suggest that changes in market conditions are unlikely to have a large effect on the demand for different types of energy (and therefore on stranding) unless renewable energy becomes a close substitute for fossil fuel energy.
Gatersleben Birgitta, White E, Abrahamse W, Jackson T, Uzzell D (2010) Values and sustainable lifestyles,In: Roaf S (eds.), Transforming Markets in the Built Environment pp. 37-50 Earthscan / James & James
With ever-increasing concerns about the consequences of climate change, households are an important focus for change. There is increasing pressure on households to change lifestyles and adopt behaviours that require less energy and natural resources. At the same time, retailers and producers of consumer goods aim to persuade people to consume more through commercial advertisements. Social science research examining sustainable behaviours often fails to examine the relative influence of both environmental concern and materialism simultaneously. Moreover, most of this research focuses on explaining or promoting behaviours with pro-environmental intent, thereby ignoring many consumer behaviours that may have a significant environmental impact. This article aims to address some of these shortcomings by examining the relationships between materialistic and environmental values and different consumer behaviours. Survey data from 194 individuals from 99 households were analysed. The findings show that quite a number of people express both relatively high levels of environmental concern and relatively high levels of materialism simultaneously. Moreover, materialism and environmental concern appear to be related to different types of behaviours. This raises important questions for the promotion of sustainable lifestyles, which may need to address not only environmental concerns but also materialistic concerns.
Pepper M, Jackson T, Uzzell D (2011) An Examination of Christianity and Socially Conscious and Frugal Consumer behaviors,Environment and Behavior 43 (2) pp. 274-290 Sage Publications
In recent years, the potential of religions for fostering more sustainable consumer behaviors on the part of their adherents has often been invoked. This article provides an overview of research on Christianity and ecologically conscious, socially conscious, and frugal consumer behaviors. Previous research has focused mainly on ecologically conscious consumer behavior, reporting mixed findings, depending on the religion measures that are used. In an extension to this body of work, a U.K.-based survey examining religious influences on socially conscious and frugal consumer behaviors is reported. Weak positive relationships between general religion measures (dispositional religiousness, spirituality, religious service attendance, and Christian identification) and both types of consumer behavior were obtained, suggesting that religion does indeed foster sustainable consumer behaviors, albeit marginally. However, attempts to distinguish among consumer behaviors by means of God concepts were largely unfruitful. Future research needs to investigate the influence of specific religious beliefs about consumerism, wealth, and social justice on consumer behavior. An increased focus on action research would also be valuable.
Loukianov Anastasia, Burningham Kate, Jackson Tim (2019) Living the Good Life on Instagram. An exploration of lay understandings of what it means to live well.,Journal of Consumer Ethics Ethical Consumer Research Association Ltd

While the consumerist approach to what living well can mean permeates traditional media, the extent to which it appears in people?s own depictions of the good life is unclear. As the unsustainability of the consumerist approach is increasingly evidenced, both in terms of environmental and social impacts, looking into which understandings of the good life resonate with people becomes essential. This article uses a sample of posts tagged #goodlife and variants originally collected in 2014-2015 on Instagram (a popular image sharing platform) to explore which understandings of the good life can be found on the platform.

Using multimodal discourse analysis, it highlights two different user generated understandings of the good life: ?working on future goals? and ?appreciating the present moment?. We argue that neither approach is directly or necessarily congruent with the traditional consumer good life. Yet their shared photographic codes with advertisements can contribute to their framing into the consumer good life.

Additionally, the temporalities afforded by the platform and currently in place through social conventions may affect the type of narratives that are mediated. While the understandings derived from the analysis are not straightforward reflections of people?s beliefs about the meaning of the good life, they constitute conversations that at once inform, and are informed by, users? beliefs about living well. The popularity of the platform makes these conversations crucial for anyone interested in desired lifestyles and their sustainability.

Burningham Kate, Venn Susan, Hayward Bronwyn, Nissen Sylvia, Aoyagi Midori, Hasan Mohammad Mehed, Jackson Tim, Jha Vimlendu, Mattar Helio, Schudel Ingrid, Yoshida Aya (2019) Ethics in context: essential flexibility in an international photo-elicitation project with children and young people,International Journal of Social Research Methodology pp. 1-16 Taylor & Francis
Existing literatures have discussed both ethical issues in visual research with young people, and the problems associated with applying ?universal? ethical guidelines across varied cultural contexts. There has been little consideration, however, of specific issues raised in projects where visual research is being conducted with young people simultaneously in multiple national contexts. This paper contributes to knowledge in this area.
We reflect on our experiences of planning and conducting the International CYCLES project involving photo elicitation with young people in Bangladesh, Brazil, India, Japan, New Zealand, South Africa and the UK. While some issues such as varying access to technology for taking and sharing photos and diverse cultural sensitivities around the use of photography were anticipated in advance, others were more unexpected.
Balancing the need for methods to be appropriate, ethical and feasible within each setting with the desire for sufficient consistency across the project is challenging. We argue that an ?ethics in context? approach and an attitude of ?methodological immaturity? is critical in international visual research projects with young people.
Young people?s understandings of living well are informed by shared sociocultural stories of the good life which have social and environmental implications and affect the possibility of sustainable and fair futures. As visual culture and social media gain importance in young people?s lives, they increasingly shape young people?s processes of meaning-making in relation to living well. This thesis aims to progress the search for fairer and more sustainable understandings of the good life by identifying which good life narratives young people use and have access to; speculating on their implications for sustainable and fair living; and exploring the role of visual mediums and social and material infrastructures in shaping these narratives and their availability. Research material is approached through a phenomenological hermeneutic framework. Analysis is based on two studies: a) a filmmaking project with four groups of 10-14 year-olds in which participants created short films about living well and; b) an exploration of the understandings of the good life accessible on Instagram through hashtag #goodlife. Each project identifies three narratives: a) the good life as luxury, as normal life, and as caring life in the filmmaking project; and b) the good life of the affluent entrepreneur, of the world-traveller, and as shared experience on Instagram. Two of these narratives (the good life as caring life and as shared experience) are less common but have more potential to support fair and sustainable futures. Findings suggest that infrastructures, which are disproportionately shaped in favour of less sustainable understandings of living well, are key in making resources available for meaning-making. Considering the theoretical possibilities of a shift in dominant narratives by linking ethics and aesthetics, the thesis concludes by making the case for injunctive normativity in research and beyond in our appraisals of good life narratives.
Mair Simon, Druckman Angela, Jackson Tim (2020) A tale of two utopias: Work in a post-growth world,Ecological Economics 173 106653 Elsevier
In this paper, we aim to contribute to the literature on post-growth futures. Modern imaginings of the future are constrained by the assumptions of growth-based capitalism. To escape these assumptions we turn to utopian fiction. We explore depictions of work in Cokaygne, a utopian tradition dating back to the 12th century, and William Morris's 19th century News from Nowhere. Cokaygne is a land of excessive consumption without work, while in News from Nowhere work is the route to the good life. These competing notions provide inspiration for a post-growth vision of work. We argue that biophysical and social dynamics mean that in a post-growth economy we are likely to have to be less productive and work more. But, this can be a utopian vision. By breaking the link between work and consumption at the level of the individual, we can remove some of the coercion in work. This would free us to do jobs that contribute to the social good, rather than generate exchange value, and empower us to fight for good work. Finally, we draw on eco-feminist analyses of capitalism to argue that by challenging labour productivity growth we can also challenge wider forces of oppression.
Isham Amy, Gatersleben Birgitta, Jackson Tim (2020) Materialism and the Experience of Flow,Journal of Happiness Studies Springer
The need to locate ways of living that can be both beneficial to personal well-being and ecologically sustainable is becoming increasingly important. Flow experiences show promise for the achievement of personal and ecological well-being. However, it is not yet understood how the materialistic values promoted by our consumer cultures may impact our ability to experience flow. A cross-sectional survey of 451 people demonstrated that materialistic values and an individual?s tendency to experience flow were negatively correlated (Study 1). Next we showed that experimentally priming a materialistic mind-set led to poorer quality flow experiences in a sample of students (Study 2) and British adults (Study 3). Our findings add to current understandings of the detrimental consequences of materialistic values and suggest that it is crucial to challenge the materialistic values present within our consumer societies if we are to provide opportunities for experiencing flow.

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