Christine Lundberg

Dr Christine Lundberg


Senior Lecturer, School Director of Communication
PhD
+44 (0)1483 682015
10 AP 02
Please see times on office door 10 AP 02

Biography

Areas of specialism

popular culture tourism; fan tourism and events; film tourism and events; TV show tourism and events; Literature tourism and events; Music tourism and events; retail tourism and events; destination marketing management

University roles and responsibilities

  • School Director of Communication

My qualifications

2014
Associate Professor of Tourism (Docent) in Sweden
Mid Sweden University
2010
PhD in Business Administration, focus on marketing in tourism
School of Business, Economics and Law at Gothenburg University, Sweden
1999
BA in Business Administration in Tourism
Mid Sweden University, Sweden
1999
BA in Human Geography in Tourism
Mid Sweden University, Sweden

Previous roles

2016 - 2016
Programme leader for PG International Event Management
2015 - 2016
Academic lead for student societies

Research

Research interests

Research projects

My teaching

My publications

Highlights

THE ECONOMIC IMPACT OF ON-SCREEN TOURISM: THE CASE OF THE LORD OF THE RINGS AND THE HOBBIT 

The economic impacts of on-screen tourism are particularly interesting, and research in this area can provide useful information to governments making decisions regarding subsidising film production and forming relevant marketing strategies. No reliable and systematic approach for measuring the economic impacts of on-screen tourism currently exists, and this study is the first to evaluate the overall economic impacts of on-screen tourism by comparing the impacts of two series of films, The Lord of the Rings and the Hobbit, both filmed in New Zealand. A new approach combining econometric and computable general equilibrium modelling techniques is used in the assessment. The results show that The Lord of the Rings did not significantly impact on the tourism and economy of New Zealand, while the Hobbit Trilogy had a significant positive impact, which may be due to effective marketing strategies and media convergence.

Li, S.Li, H., Song, H., Lundberg, C. & Shen, S. (2017) The Economic Impact of On-Screen Tourism: The Case of The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit. Tourism Management, 60, pp. 177-187.

 

CONCEPTUALISING ON-SCREEN TOURISM DESTINATION DEVELOPMENT

This article integrates cultural theory and marketing strategy to examine the complex relationship between on-screen popular culture and tourism destination place-making. Its review of the literature results in the development of an interdisciplinary conceptual framework (termed ‘on-screen dollying’) that provides a culturally grounded and contextually driven theorisation of the means by which on-screen popular culture place-making can foster destination development. In developing the conceptual framework, the article classifies the characteristics of on-screen tourism affecting destination development and identifies six strategies for leveraging on-screen tourism. Based on our interdisciplinary analysis, we propose a research agenda that integrates on-screen tourism and destination place-making and which has implications for policy and theory.

 

Lundberg, C., Ziakas, V. & Morgan, N. (2017) Conceptualising On-Screen Tourism Destination Development, Tourist Studies. http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1468797617708511

 

Publications

Lundberg C, Lexhagen M (2014) Bitten by the Twilight Saga: From Pop Culture Consumer to Pop Culture Tourist, In: Sharpley R, Stone P (eds.), Contemporary Tourist Experience Concepts and Consequences Routledge
The book critically explores these experiences from multidisciplinary perspectives and includes case studies from wide range of geographical regions.
Lundberg C, Lexhagen M, Mattsson S (2012) Twication: The Twilight Saga Travel Experience, Jengel Förlag AB
Lundberg C (2010) Challenges in Delivering Services: The Front-Line Hospitality and Tourism Perspective, Intellecta Infolog
Lundberg C, Gudmundsson A, Andersson T (2008) Herzberg?s Two-Factor Theory of Work Motivation Tested Empirically on Seasonal Workers in Hospitality and Tourism, Tourism Management 30 pp. 890-899
Lexhagen M, Larson M, Lundberg C (2013) The Virtual Fan(g) Community: Social Media and Pop Culture Tourism, In: Gyimóthy S, Munar AM, Cai L (eds.), Tourism Social Media: Transformations in Identity, Community and Culture 18 Emerald
Gudmundsson A, Lundberg C (2001) Internal Marketing ? A Way of Improving Service Quality, In: ETOUR Working Papers Series WP 2001:7 ETOUR Mid Sweden University
Lundberg C, Mossberg L (2008) Learning by Sharing: Waiters? and Bartenders? Experiences of Service Encounters, Journal of Foodservice 19 (1) pp. 44-52
Lundberg C, Fredman P (2011) Success Factors and Constraints among Nature-Based Tourism Entrepreneurs, Current Issues in Tourism 15 (7) pp. 649-671
Lundberg C, Gudmundsson A, Andersson T (2001) Work Motivation of Seasonal Employees ? a Study of a Swedish Ski-Resort,
Lundberg C, Lexhagen M (2014) Pop Culture Tourism: A Research Model, In: Chauvel A, Lamerichs N, Seymour J (eds.), Fan Studies: Researching Popular Audiences Inter-Disciplinary Press
Sundström M, Lundberg C, Giannakis S (2011) Tourist Shopping Motivation: Go with the Flow or Follow the Plan, International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences 3 (2) pp. 211-224
Lundberg C, Sundström M (2004) Marketing a Shopping Destination: Three Perspectives on the Core Values of a Destination Brand,
Lundberg C (2005) War Stories from the Front-Line: Seasonal Employees? Experiences of Critical Incidents in Service Encounters,
Lundberg C, Fredman P, Wall-Reinius S (2012) Going for the Green? The Role of Money among Nature-Based Tourism Entrepreneurs, Current Issues in Tourism 17 (4) pp. 373-380
Lundberg C (2010) The Popular Culture Tourism Service System: The Case of Twilight, Impresa Ambiente Management 4 (3) pp. 439-458
Lundberg C, Lexhagen M, Mattsson S (2011) I populärkulturturismens spår: Twilight + Vacation = Twication, Jengel Förlag AB
Lundberg C (2011) Critical Service Encounters in Restaurants: The Personnel?s Perspective, Scandinavian Journal of Hospitality and Tourism 11 (1) pp. 1-19
Sievänen T, Fredman P, Søndergaard Jensen F, Lexhagen M, Lundberg C, Sandell K, Wall Reinius S, Wolf-Watz D (2016) Foresight Outdoor Recreation ? A Discussion Based on Monitoring Experiences in the Nordic Context,
Gudmundsson A, Lundberg C (2001) The Lives and Attitudes of Employees in Tourism ? A Study of Seasonal Workers in a Swedish Ski-Resort, In: ETOUR Working Papers Series 2001:6 ETOUR Mid Sweden University
Lundberg C, Lindström K, Lexhagen M (2014) Broadening the Experience/Servicescape Concepts: Evidence from Popular Culture Destination,
Larson M, Lundberg C, Lexhagen M (2011) The Town of the Living, the City of the Un-Dead: Developing Film Tourism,
Lundberg C (2003) Vocational Education and Training within the Swedish Hotel and Catering Industries,
Müller D, Pettersson R, Fredman P, Lundberg C, Frey B, Hansson M-B, Bederoff D (2001) Tyska turister i Sverige: forskning och studier som ger ökad kunskap om tyska turister och som kan bidra till att svenska turistföretag blir framgångsrika på den tyska resemarknaden, In: ETOUR Science Series ETOUR Mid Sweden University
Lundberg C (2006) A Word-of-Mouth Communication Approach to Informal Information Sharing among Seasonal Front-Line Employees in Tourism,
Larson M, Lundberg C, Lexhagen M (2013) Thirsting for Vampire Tourism: Developing Pop Culture Destinations, . Journal of Destination Marketing & Management 2 (2) pp. 74-84
Lundberg C, Lindström K (2016) The Production of Popular Culture Destination Servicescapes: A Critical Twist,
Lundberg C, Lexhagen M (2015) Mountain visitors, Internet, and social media usage,
Fredman P, Wall-Reinius S, Sandell K, Lexhagen M, Lundberg C, Bodén N, Dahlberg A (2014) Besök och besökare i fjällen: Resultat från en undersökning avseende svenskarnas fritidsaktiviteter i fjällen, besök i olika fjällområden, landskapsrelationer, fjällen i sociala medier, upplevelser av vindkraft och attityder till skyddad natur, In: ETOUR Science Series ETOUR Mid Sweden University
Fredman P, Wolf-Watz D, Sandell K, Wall-Reinius S, Lexhagen M, Lundberg C, Ankre R (2016) Dagens miljömål och framtidens fjällupplevelse ? Iakttagelser av aktivitetsmönster, landskapsrelationer och kommunikationsformer, ETOUR Mid Sweden University
Lundberg C (2008) A Word-of-Mouth Approach to Informal Information Sharing among Part-Time and Short-Term Employed Front-Line Workers in Tourism, Journal of Vacation Marketing 14 (1) pp. 23-39
Lundberg C, Fredman P, Junger E, Gudmundsson A, Emmelin L (2000) Tyskar i fjällen. Resultat från en fältundersökning i Femundsmarka, Rogen och Långfjället, In: ETOUR Working Papers Series WP 2000:3 ETOUR Mid Sweden University
Fredman P, Wall-Reinius S, Lundberg C (2009) Turism i natur: Definitioner, omfattning, statistik, In: ETOUR Science Series 2009:23 ETOUR Mid Sweden University
Gyimóthy S, Lundberg C, Lexhagen M, Larson M, Lindström K (2013) Popculture Tourism: A Research Manifesto,

This handbook provides a comprehensive overview and holistic analysis of the intersection between tourism and popular culture. It examines current debates, questions and controversies of tourism in the wake of popular culture phenomena and explores the relationships between popular culture, globalization, tourism and mobility. In addition, it offers a cross-disciplinary, cutting edge review of the character of popular cultural production and consumption trends, analyzing their consequences for tourism, spatial strategies and destination competitiveness.

The scope of the volume encompasses various expressions of popular culture such as cinema, TV shows, music, literature, sports and heritage. Featuring a mix of theoretical and empirical chapters, the handbook problematizes and conceptualizes the ties and clusters of popular cultural actors, thereby positioning tourism within the wider context of creative economies, cultural planning and multimodal technologies.

Written by an international team of academics with expertise in a range of disciplines, this timely book will be of interest to researchers from a variety of subjects including tourism, events, geography, cultural studies, fandom research, political economy, business, media studies and technology.

Li ShiNa, Li H, Song H, Lundberg Christine, Shen S (2016) The economic impact of on-screen tourism: The case of The Lord of the rings and the Hobbit, Tourism Management 60 pp. 177-187 Elsevier
The economic impacts of on-screen tourism are particularly interesting, and research in this area can provide useful information to governments making decisions regarding subsidising film production and forming relevant marketing strategies. No reliable and systematic approach for measuring the economic impacts of on-screen tourism currently exists, and this study is the first to evaluate the overall economic impacts of on-screen tourism by comparing the impacts of two series of films, The Lord of the Rings and the Hobbit, both filmed in New Zealand. A new approach combining econometric and computable general equilibrium modelling techniques is used in the assessment. The results show that The Lord of the Rings did not significantly impact on the tourism and economy of New Zealand, while the Hobbit Trilogy had a significant positive impact, which may be due to effective marketing strategies and media convergence.
Gyimóthy S, Lundberg C, Lindström K, Lexhagen M, Larson M (2015) Popculture Tourism: A Research Manifesto, In: Chambers D, Rakic T (eds.), Tourism Research Frontiers: Beyond the Boundaries of Knowledge Emerald
Lundberg C, Ziakas V, Morgan N (2017) Conceptualising on-screen tourism destination development, Tourist Studies 18 (1) Sage Publications
This article integrates cultural theory and marketing strategy to examine the complex relationship between on-screen popular culture and tourism destination place-making. Its review of the literature results in the development of an interdisciplinary conceptual framework (termed ?on-screen dollying?) that provides a culturally grounded and contextually driven theorisation of the means by which on-screen popular culture place-making can foster destination development. In developing the conceptual framework, the article classifies the characteristics of on-screen tourism affecting destination development and identifies six strategies for leveraging on-screen tourism. Based on our interdisciplinary analysis, we propose a research agenda that integrates on-screen tourism and destination place-making and which has implications for policy and theory.
Lundberg C, Ziakas V (2018) Fantrepreneurs in the Sharing Economy: Co-Creating Neo-Tribal Events, Event Management 22 (2) pp. 287-301 Cognizant Communication Corporation
The purpose of this article is to explore fan event organizers' (i.e., fantrepreneurs) cocreation processes linked to their fandom and neotribal characteristics as enacted within the sharing economy. In so doing, the article introduces the conceptual frameworks for understanding fantrepreneurs and subsequent cocreation of neotribal events. The article combines conceptual research methods with an analysis of empirical data collected through interviews with fantrepreneurs to enhance the explanatory power of the proposed frameworks. Findings show that there is a strong relationship between the collaborative consumption of fantrepreneurs and their neotribal lifestyle characteristics, which can be leveraged to enhance collaborative and cocreation patterns. This relationship is moderated by the factors of authenticity, nostalgia, autonomy, and anticommercialization that fantrepreneurs exhibit through the cocreation of (and within) neotribal fandom events. This integrated perspective marks fantrepreneurship as an emerging phenomenon within the sharing economy by shedding light on the cocreation patterns, moderating factors, and their interaction effects that explain the relationship between collaborative consumption and neotribalism characterizing the behavior of fantrepreneurs. The article conceptualizes the emergence of fantrepreneurs and cocreation of neotribal events providing an interdisciplinary foundation for future research that integrates literature on fandom, cocreation, and neotribalism. The resulting frameworks contribute to the understanding of fantrepreneurship as a manifestation of the sharing economy, which brings forward new fan patterns and practices in events.