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Prof Simon Taylor


Professor of Ophthalmology
MA MB BChir (Cantab) PhD DIC (Imperial) MEd FRSB FHEA FAcMEd FRCOphth
+44 (0)1483 682814
06 PG 02

Biography

Areas of specialism

Ophthalmology; Immunology

University roles and responsibilities

  • Professor of Ophthalmology

My qualifications

1995
BA
Gonville & Caius College, Cambridge
1998
MB BChir
Gonville & Caius College, Cambridge
2009
PhD
Imperial College London
2001
MA
University of Cambridge
2017
MEd
University of Dundee

Previous roles

2012 - 2015
Senior Clinical Lecturer
Imperial College London
2009 - 2012
Clinical Lecturer
UCL Institute of Ophthalmology & Moorfields Eye Hospital

Affiliations and memberships

FRSB
Fellow of the Royal Society of Biology
FRCOphth
Fellow of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists
FHEA
Fellow of the Higher Education Academy
FAcMedEd
Fellow of the Academy of Medical Educators

Research

Research interests

Indicators of esteem

  • Co-editor, Open Ophthalmology Journal

    Associate Editor, BMC Ophthalmology

    Editorial Board Member, British Journal of Hospital Medicine

    Editorial Board Member, Case Reports in Ophthalmology

Supervision

Postgraduate research supervision

My publications

Publications

Shao EH, Tempest-Roe S, Taylor SR (2015) Increases in markers of renal damage in patients with diabetic maculopathy receiving intravitreal Avastin
Taylor SR, Singh J, Sagoo MS, Lightman SL (2012) Clinical and molecular features associated with cystic visceral lesions in von hippel-lindau disease. The open ophthalmology journal 6 pp. 83-85
Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) is an uncommon oncogenic disorder which occurs as a result of genetic mutations on chromosome 3p. Retinal capillary haemangiomas and CNS haemangioblastomas have been well-characterised in genotypic-phenotypic analyses, but cystic visceral lesions are less common and have been less frequently studied. The aim of this study was to perform genotypic and phenotypic analysis of a cohort of VHL patients that developed cystic visceral lesions to determine whether their genotype differs from that seen in other manifestations of VHL and whether the ocular manifestations differ.This study reports a prospective case series of twenty-one patients identified from the Hammersmith Hospital Genetics Service database as having VHL mutations. Patients underwent regular ocular and systemic screening as well as genotypic analysis. The main outcome measures were the development of VHL lesions, either ocular or systemic.Cystic visceral lesions were detected in six of the 21 patients from the clinic (29%). These included renal cysts in four patients, pancreatic cysts in three patients, and an epididymal cystadenoma in one patient. Renal cysts were not associated with any specific genotype. Pancreatic cysts appeared to occur in association with VHL gene deletions and all developed CNS haemangioblastomas. Only one patient developed ocular manifestations, which occurred in this patient in the form of two retinal capillary haemangiomas.VHL gene deletions appeared to be associated with pancreatic cysts and the development of CNS haemangioblastomas. Ocular manifestations are uncommon in this group of patients.
Taylor SR, Menezo V, Lympany P, Watson D, du Bois RM, Lightman S (2004) Interferon?Gamma Polymorphisms as Genetic Predictors of Uveitis in Sarcoidosis
Talat L, Tomkins-Netzer O, Taylor SRJ, Din NM, Bar A, Isa H, Lightman S (2014) The influence of diabetes mellitus on the management and visual outcome of patients with uveitis ACTA OPHTHALMOLOGICA 92 (4) pp. e329-e330
Taylor SRJ (2010) Ocular Syphilis
Syphilis is still an important cause of eye disease and blindness in the Western world and is being diagnosed with increasing frequency in patients with HIV/AIDS. It is known as the 'great imitator' and can present to ophthalmologists with myriad symptoms and signs. Diagnosis is based on clinical examination and serological testing. The mainstay of treatment remains penicillin, but care needs to be taken that the treatment given is adequate for neurosyphilis.
Manasseh GSL, Shao EH, Taylor SRJ (2015) Treatment of diabetic maculopathy BRITISH JOURNAL OF HOSPITAL MEDICINE 76 (1) pp. 35-40
Joshi L, Lightman S, Taylor SRJ (2011) Ocular vascular involvement in the rheumatic diseases Current Rheumatology Reviews 7 pp. 39-50
Taylor SRJ, Banker A, Schlaen A, Couto C, Matthe E, Joshi L, Menezo V, Ethan N, Tomkins-Netzer O, Bar A, Morarji J, Mccluskey P, Lightman S (2013) INTRAOCULAR METHOTREXATE CAN INDUCE EXTENDED REMISSION IN SOME PATIENTS IN NONINFECTIOUS UVEITIS RETINA-THE JOURNAL OF RETINAL AND VITREOUS DISEASES 33 (10) pp. 2149-2154
Taylor SRJ The P2X7 receptor in immune cells
The P2X7 receptor is a cation channel activated by high concentrations of ATP. Its stimulation is pro-inflammatory, with activation resulting in the release of cytokines (notably IL-1²), changes in plasma membrane lipid distribution, and cell death. A central role for P2X7 in IL-1² secretion via the NALP3 inflammasome has been confirmed in gene-deficient mice generated by GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) and Pfizer. It is abundantly expressed on cells of the immune system and may play a role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease, notable systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Indeed, P2X7 has become an important potential therapeutic target, and antagonists are currently in Phase II clinical trials for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this thesis, I describe my investigation into the role of the P2X7 receptor in immune function, examining in detail the responses of murine T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells to P2X7 stimulation. Investigation of T cell responses reveals a novel form of cell death in which cells initially shrink and then swell, before undergoing catastrophic lysis with release of cellular contents into the surrounding milieu, a process which I have termed aponecrosis as it bears features of both apoptosis and necrosis. In addition, I report a detailed characterisation of immune cells from the GSK P2X7-/- mouse. Functional and mRNA data demonstrate tissue-specific ?leakiness?, such that P2X7 expression is ablated in P2X7-/- macrophages, but not in P2X7-/- T cells. This explains previous paradoxical experimental and immunohistochemical data achieved with P2X7-/- mice without the need to invoke the expression of an additional P2X7-like protein cross-reactive with P2X7 antibodies. Finally, I report the use of a mouse model of antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis to demonstrate that P2X7 plays a key pro-inflammatory role in immune-mediated injury and that this receptor is a possible therapeutic target in vivo.
Taylor SR, Gurbaxani A, Sallam A, Lightman S (2012) Topical prostaglandin analogues and conjunctival inflammation in uveitic glaucoma. The open ophthalmology journal 6 pp. 75-78
A pilot study to determine whether topical prostaglandin analogues alter the expression of conjunctival inflammatory markers in patients with uveitic glaucoma.Prospective, single-masked case series of 20 patients with uveitis and secondary raised intraocular pressure. Participants were divided into four groups of five patients dependent on their use of topical medication: (1) prostaglandin analogues only, (2) corticosteroids only, (3) both prostaglandin analogues and corticosteroids, (4) no topical medication. Conjunctival cells were harvested by impression cytology and were examined for inflammatory markers (CD3, CD54, HLA-DR, CCR4, CCR5) by flow cytometry. A tear fluid sample was also examined for inflammatory cytokines (IL-12p70, IL-2, IL-10, IL-8, IL-6, IL-4, IL-5, IFN-gamma, IL-1beta, IFN-alpha, IFN-beta) by multiplex bead arrays.All groups demonstrated increased markers of conjunctival inflammation. There was no significant difference in levels of any inflammatory markers between the four groups, suggesting that the use of topical prostaglandin analogues does not increase conjunctival levels of inflammation beyond those already seen in uveitis.The use of topical prostaglandins does not appear to induce conjunctival inflammation over that which is already present in patients with uveitic glaucoma. This supports the use of topical prostaglandin analogues in patients with uveitic glaucoma, indicating that their use is unlikely to adversely affect subsequent glaucoma filtration surgery through the induction of chronic conjunctival inflammation.
Tomkins-Netzer O, Taylor SRJ, Bar A, Lula A, Yaganti S, Talat L, Lightman S (2014) Treatment with Repeat Dexamethasone Implants Results in Long-Term Disease Control in Eyes with Noninfectious Uveitis OPHTHALMOLOGY 121 (8) pp. 1649-1654
Shao EH, Karydis A, Gemenetzi M, Taylor SR (2013) Successful corticosteroid-sparing effect of rituximab in the treatment of refractory idiopathic orbital inflammatory disease. Case reports in ophthalmology 4 (3) pp. 216-218
Idiopathic orbital inflammatory disease (IOID) is an idiopathic inflammatory process within the orbit that can result in permanent visual impairment. Although high-dose oral corticosteroids are currently the mainstay of therapy, their long-term usage can cause significant toxicity. We present a case of IOID that was successfully treated with the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab following failed steroid sparing with conventional second-line immunosuppressive agents.
Tan LT, McNab A, Lightman S, Taylor SRJ (2011) Orbital involvement in the rheumatic diseases Current Rheumatology Reviews 7 pp. 51-60
Joshi L, Tomkins-Netzer O, Menezo V, Sallam A, Kirkpatrick N, Lightman S, Taylor SRJ (2013) Dexamethasone implants and neovascular glaucoma in central retinal vein occlusion Acta Ophthalmologica 91 (3) pp. e239-e240
Tempest-Roe S, Tam FW, Taylor SRJ (2013) The duration of LPS priming determines the phenotype of macrophage, but not T cell P2X7 responses Immunology
Tan P, Taylor SRJ, Lightman S (2011) Ocular effects of drugs used in the rheumatic diseases Current Rheumatology Reviews 7 pp. 61-73
Liolios V, Joshi L, Menezo V, McLoone E, Lightman S, Taylor SRJ (2013) Dexamethasone intravitreal implant in paediatric non-infectious intermediate and posterior uveitis
Taylor SRJ, McCluskey P, Lightman S (2006) The ocular manifestations of inflammatory bowel disease CURRENT OPINION IN OPHTHALMOLOGY 17 (6) pp. 538-544
Goni FJ, Stalmans I, Denis P, Nordmann JP, Taylor SRJ, Diestelhorst M, Figueiredo AR, Garway-Heath DF (2016) Elevated Intraocular Pressure After Intravitreal Steroid Injection in Diabetic Macular Edema: Monitoring and Management Ophthalmology and Therapy
Introduction: With the increasing use of intravitreal administration of corticosteroids in macular edema, steroid-induced intraocular
pressure (IOP) rise is becoming an emergent issue. However, for patients in whom intravitreal steroids are indicated, there are no specific recommendations for IOP monitoring and management after intravitreal administration of corticosteroids.
Method: An expert panel of European ophthalmologists reviewed evidence on corticosteroid-induced IOP elevation. The objective of the panel was to propose an algorithm based on available literature and their own experience for the monitoring and management of corticosteroid-induced IOP elevation, with a focus on diabetic patients.
Results: Data from trials including diabetic patients with a rise of IOP after intravitreal steroid administration indicate that IOP-lowering medical treatment is sufficient for a large majority of patients; only a small percentage underwent laser trabeculoplasty or filtering filtration surgery. A 2-step algorithm is proposed that is based on the basal value of IOP and evidence for glaucoma. The first step is a
risk stratification before treatment. Patients normotensive at baseline (IOP B 21 mmHg), do not require additional baseline diagnostic tests.
However, patients with baseline ocular hypertension (OHT) (IOP[21 mmHg) should undergo baseline imaging and visual field
testing. The second step describes monitoring and treatment after steroid administration. During follow-up, patients developing OHT should have baseline and periodical imaging and visual field testing; IOP-lowering treatment is proposed only if IOP is [25 mmHg or if diagnostic tests suggest developing glaucoma. Conclusion: The management and follow-up of OHT following intravitreal corticosteroid
injection is similar to that of primary OHT. If OHT develops, IOP is controlled in a large proportion of patients with standard IOP
treatments. The present algorithm was developed to assist ophthalmologists with guiding principles in the management of corticosteroid-induced IOP elevation.
Taylor SRJ, Gonzalez-Begne M, Dewhurst S, Chimini G, Higgins CF, Melvin JE, Elliott JI (2008) Sequential shrinkage and swelling underlie P2X(7)-stimulated lymphocyte phosphatidylserine exposure and death JOURNAL OF IMMUNOLOGY 180 (1) pp. 300-308
Tan LT, Isa H, Din NM, Tomkins O, Taylor SRJ, Rose G, Pusey CD, Verity D, Lightman S, Luthert P Orbital manifestations of granulomatosis with polyangiitis: Clinical, imaging and histological features
Taylor SR, Lightman SL (2012) Curbside Consultation in Uveitis
Images, diagrams, and references are included to enhance the text and to illustrate clinical diagnoses and treatment plans.
Taylor S, Lightman S (2005) Visual impairment in the elderly BRITISH JOURNAL OF HOSPITAL MEDICINE 66 (12) pp. 662-663
Sallam A, Taylor S (2009) Ocular emergencies 1: traumatic BRITISH JOURNAL OF HOSPITAL MEDICINE 70 (3) pp. M36-M37
Joshi L, Taylor SRJ, Lightman S (2011) The eye and phacomatoses BRITISH JOURNAL OF HOSPITAL MEDICINE 72 (12) pp. 677-681
Isa H (2015) Predictors of Disease Extension and Progression in Patients with Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis (GPA).
Taylor SR, Singh J, Sagoo MS, Lightman SL (2012) Clinical and molecular features associated with cystic visceral lesions in von hippel-lindau disease. Open Ophthalmol J 6 pp. 83-85
BACKGROUND: Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) is an uncommon oncogenic disorder which occurs as a result of genetic mutations on chromosome 3p. Retinal capillary haemangiomas and CNS haemangioblastomas have been well-characterised in genotypic-phenotypic analyses, but cystic visceral lesions are less common and have been less frequently studied. The aim of this study was to perform genotypic and phenotypic analysis of a cohort of VHL patients that developed cystic visceral lesions to determine whether their genotype differs from that seen in other manifestations of VHL and whether the ocular manifestations differ. METHODS: This study reports a prospective case series of twenty-one patients identified from the Hammersmith Hospital Genetics Service database as having VHL mutations. Patients underwent regular ocular and systemic screening as well as genotypic analysis. The main outcome measures were the development of VHL lesions, either ocular or systemic. RESULTS: Cystic visceral lesions were detected in six of the 21 patients from the clinic (29%). These included renal cysts in four patients, pancreatic cysts in three patients, and an epididymal cystadenoma in one patient. Renal cysts were not associated with any specific genotype. Pancreatic cysts appeared to occur in association with VHL gene deletions and all developed CNS haemangioblastomas. Only one patient developed ocular manifestations, which occurred in this patient in the form of two retinal capillary haemangiomas. CONCLUSIONS: VHL gene deletions appeared to be associated with pancreatic cysts and the development of CNS haemangioblastomas. Ocular manifestations are uncommon in this group of patients.
Taylor SRJ, Church J, Aggarwal R (2005) The 1CU Intraocular Accommodative Lens: Experience of 50 cases
Jameel AA, Nouraeinejad A, Yang DS, Jeffs N, Galatowicz G, Calder V, Taylor SRJ, Lightman S (2011) The immunoregulatory effects of interferon-alpha therapy on T-cell responsiveness in ocular Behcet's disease
Md Din S, Isa H, Lightman S, Taylor SRJ (2012) Retinal nerve fibre layer thickness changes in raised Intraocular pressure in uveitis
Tomkins-Netzer O, Talat L, Bar A, Lula A, Taylor SRJ, Joshi L, Lightman S (2014) Long-Term Clinical Outcome and Causes of Vision Loss in Patients with Uveitis OPHTHALMOLOGY 121 (12) pp. 2387-2392
Sen HN, Drye LT, Goldstein DA, Larson TA, Merrill PT, Pavan PR, Sheppard JD, Burke A, Srivastava SK, Jabs DA (2012) Hypotony in Patients with Uveitis: The Multicenter Uveitis Steroid Treatment (MUST) Trial Ocular Immunology and Inflammation 20 (2) pp. 104-112
Din NM (2014) Elevated intraocular pressure in uveitis: effects on the retinal nerve fiber layer, clinical course and surgical outcome in adults and children
Pacheco PA, Taylor SRJ, Miguel CT, Gonzalo DV (2008) Azathioprine in the management of autoimmune uveitis OCULAR IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION 16 (4) pp. 161-165
Tan LT, Isa H, Lightman S, Taylor SRJ (2012) Prevalence and causes of phthisis bulbi in a uveitis clinic ACTA OPHTHALMOLOGICA 90 (5) pp. e417-e418
Joshi L, Shirodkhar A, Taylor SRJ, Lightman S (2011) A novel integration of an ophthalmoscopy teaching mdel with simulated patients - its role in providing contextual feedback
Shirodkhar A, Lightman S, Taylor SRJ (2012) Retinal vein occlusions in uveitis
Lau CH, Taylor SRJ, Lightman S (2003) The eye in malignant disease British Journal of Hospital Medicine 3 (64) pp. 177-179
Taylor SRJ, Salama AD, Joshi L, Pusey CD, Lightman SL (2009) Rituximab Is Effective in the Treatment of Refractory Ophthalmic Wegener's Granulomatosis ARTHRITIS AND RHEUMATISM 60 (5) pp. 1540-1547
Taylor SR, Tomkins-Netzer O, Lightman SL (2012) New Treatments in Noninfectious Uveitis
Miserocchi E, Pontikaki I, Modorati G, et al: Rituximab for uveitis. Ophthalmology 2011;118: 223?224. Miserocchi E, Pontikaki I, Modorati G, et al: AntiCD20 monoclonal antibody (rituximab) treatment for inflammatory ocular diseases.
Taylor SRJ, Pacheco P, Habot-Wilner Z, Lightman S (2012) Intraocular methotrexate in uveitis
Taylor SRJ, Tomkins-Netzer O, Joshi L, Morarji J, McLoone E, Lightman S (2012) Dexamethasone Implant in Pediatric Uveitis OPHTHALMOLOGY 119 (11) pp. 2412-+
Hooper CY, Lightman SL, Pacheco P, Tam PM, Khan A, Taylor SR (2012) Adjunctive antibiotics in the treatment of acute bacterial endophthalmitis following cataract surgery. Acta Ophthalmol 90 (7) pp. e572-e573
Kabasele P (2011) Causes of visual loss in patients with uveitis
Taylor SRJ, Gonzalez-Begne M, Sojka DK, Richardson JC, Sheardown SA, Harrison SM, Pusey CD, Tam FWK, Elliott JI (2009) Lymphocytes from P2X(7)-deficient mice exhibit enhanced P2X(7) responses JOURNAL OF LEUKOCYTE BIOLOGY 85 (6) pp. 978-986
Joshi L (2011) Evaluating Novel and Established Therapies for Uveitis
Frick KD, Drye LT, Kempen JH, Dunn JP, Holland GN, Latkany P, Rao NA, Sen HN, Sugar EA, Thorne JE, Wang RC, Holbrook JT (2012) Associations among Visual Acuity and Vision- and Health-Related Quality of Life among Patients in the Multicenter Uveitis Steroid Treatment Trial Investigative Opthalmology & Visual Science 53 (3) pp. 1169-1169
Harris F, Chalkiadakis S, Taylor SRJ (2016) The role of inflammation in the pathophysiology of DMO Eye News Feb/Mar2016 pp. 19-23
Diabetic macular oedema (DMO) is a major cause of visual loss in diabetes, with a complex multifactorial pathogenesis. In the UK
alone it is estimated that there are nearly 2.5 million diabetic patients aged over 12 years. Approximately 65,000 of these have clinically significant DMO that affects their visual acuity in at least one eye [1]. In DMO, the final common pathway is disruption of the blood-retinal
barrier (BRB), resulting in leakage of fluid into the retinal layers, but causation is complicated, with many factors
contributing to the process. Nevertheless, evidence is mounting that inflammation is implicated in BRB breakdown, together
with hypoxia, alterations in blood flow and retinal ischaemia.
Md Din S, Isa H, Taylor SRJ, Barton K, Lightman S (2012) Raised intraocular pressure in uveitis Expert Review of Ophthalmology 1 (7) pp. 45-59
Taylor S, Yang D, Galatowicz G, Nouraeinejad A, Calder V, Lightman S (2010) IMMUNOMODULATORY MECHANISMS INDUCED BY IFN ALPHA 2B CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RHEUMATOLOGY 28 (4) pp. S128-S128
Bar A, Tomkins-Netzer O, Taylor SRJ, Lightman S (2012) Visual outcomes in uveitis
Taylor SRJ, Lightman S (2008) When and how to use periocular and intraocular corticosteroid injections
Taylor SRJ, Lightman S (2011) Hot Topic: The Eye in Rheumatological Disease Current Rheumatology Reviews (1) pp. 2-2
Taylor SRJ, Salama AD, Joshi L, Pusey CD, Lightman SL (2009) Rituximab Is Effective in the Treatment of Refractory Ophthalmic Wegener's Granulomatosis ARTHRITIS AND RHEUMATISM 60 (5) pp. 1540-1547
Joshi L, Tanna A, McAdoo SP, Medjeral-Thomas N, Taylor SRJ, Sandhu G, Tarzi RM, Pusey CD, Lightman S (2015) Long-term Outcomes of Rituximab Therapy in Ocular Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis Impact on Localized and Nonlocalized Disease OPHTHALMOLOGY 122 (6) pp. 1262-1268
Menezo V, Taylor SRJ (2016) Choroidopathy Punctate Inner
Punctate inner choroidopathy is an uncommon posterior multifocal chorioretinopathy first
described by Watzke et al. (1984). It is character ized by the presence of small, focal, yellow
lesions at the posterior pole occurring at the level of the inner choroid/retinal pigment epithelium in the absence of vitreous inflammation. It usually affects young, myopic females (who may also be fair haired with blue- or light-colored irides). The usual presenting symptoms include blurred vision, scotomata, and/or photopsia.
These usually occur due secondary to inflammatory foci at the time of presentation, but can be
caused by choroidal neovascularization (CNV) complicating the inflammatory focus or by scarring consequent to the inflammation. Despite having such a distinct clinical phenotype, there remains some controversy as to
whether this disease simply represents part of a larger spectrum of chorioretinal disorders of unknown origin, including idiopathic multifocal choroiditis (MFC), the white dot syndrome (WDS) spectrum, and idiopathic or myopia-associated CNV formation.

Although the majority of cases run a self-limited course, up to 69 % of eyes may develop
CNV, and furthermore about half of eyes develop subretinal fibrosis with consequent visual loss
often characterized by enlarging and new scotomata and in some cases further impairment of vision.

Khan OA, Taylor SRJ, Swart M, Jones JG (1997) The effects of low dose isoflurane on inhibition of saccadic generation British Journal of Anaesthesia (79) pp. 576-576
Kabasele P, Lightman S, Taylor SRJ (2012) Visual loss in uveitis: outcomes and causes
Tomkins-Netzer O, Bar A, Taylor SRJ, Lightman S (2012) Long-term outcomes in birdshot chorioretinopathy
de Smet MD, Taylor SRJ, Bodaghi B, Miserocchi E, Murray PI, Pleyer U, Zierhut M, Barisani-Asenbauer T, Phuc L, Lightman S (2011) Understanding uveitis: The impact of research on visual outcomes PROGRESS IN RETINAL AND EYE RESEARCH 30 (6) pp. 452-470
Tan LT, Davagnaman I, Isa H, Taylor SRJ, Rose GE, Verity DH, Pusey CD, Lightman S (2013) Clinical and imaging features predictive of granulomatosis with polyangiitis in orbital inflammation
Tan LT, Davagnanam I, Isa H, Taylor SR, Rose GE, Verity DH, Pusey CD, Lightman S (2014) Clinical and Imaging Features Predictive of Orbital Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis and the Risk of Systemic Involvement OPHTHALMOLOGY 121 (6) pp. 1304-1309
Taylor SR, Elliott JI (2007) The P2X7 Receptor in Ocular Inflammatory Disease Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 48
Tempest-Roe S, Tam FW, Taylor SRJ (2013) The phenotype of dendritic cell, but not macrophage, P2X7 responses is independent of the duration of LPS priming Immunology
Taylor SRJ, Khan OA, Swart M, Jones JG (1997) The effects of low-dose isoflurane on contrast sensitivity in volunteers British Journal of Anaesthesia (79) pp. 576-576
Joshi L, Menezo V, Yaganti S, Talat L, Lightman S, Taylor SRJ (2013) Uveitis refractory to mycophenolate mofetil: value & safety of switching or adding alternative non-biological agents
Taylor SRJ, Salama AD, Pusey CD, Lightman SL (2007) Ocular Manfestations of Wegener's Granulomatosis Expert Review of Ophthalmology 2 (1) pp. 91-103
Muthusamy K, Lightman S, Taylor SRJ (2011) The eye in renal disease BRITISH JOURNAL OF HOSPITAL MEDICINE 72 (12) pp. 686-690
Tomkins-Netzer O, Taylor SRJ, Lightman S (2013) Can Rituximab Induce Long-Term Disease Remission in Patients with Intra-Ocular Non-Infectious Inflammation? OPHTHALMOLOGICA 230 (3) pp. 109-115
Gementzi M, Karydis A, Shao EH, Menezo V, Taylor SR (2014) Intensive intravitreal methotrexate for refractory cystoid macular oedema secondary to intraocular inflammation: a small case series
Taylor SRJ, Tadayoni R, Pearce I, Warburton J, Margaron P, Wright J, Lambrou G (2014) Visual acuity outcomes in patients with retinal vein occlusion treated with ranibizumab according to baseline ischaemic status: an analysis of BRIGHTER and CRUISE
Aim: To evaluate the visual acuity outcomes with ranibizumab (RBZ) according to baseline ischaemic status in patients with macular oedema secondary to branch or central retinal vein occlusion (BRVO and CRVO) Methods: Analysis of 2 multicenter randomized clinical trials (CRUISE and BRIGHTER) Results: Data of 392 CRVO patients randomized in CRUISE and 455 BRVO patients randomized in BRIGHTER were analysed. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) was measured using ETDRS charts at each visit. Presence or absence of retinal ischaemia at baseline was assessed by fluorescein angiography by the central reading centre (CRC). In CRUISE, ischaemia was defined as >30% total capillary loss in the center subfield by area. In BRIGHTER, ischaemia was defined as present if capillary loss was detected and scored as mild, moderate, severe or complete in at least one location of the center, inner or outer subfields. Baseline visual acuity, and change from baseline were reported according to ischaemic status as a post-hoc analysis over 12 months for CRUISE and as a pre-defined exploratory analysis over 6 months for BRIGHTER. In addition, data on injection requirements during the PRN phase of CRUISE (months 7-12) were analysed. Data for RBZ treatment arms (0.3mg and 0.5mg) were combined in the CRUISE analysis. Data were available for 334 patients in CRUISE (ischaemic; RBZ n=15, sham n=4: non-ischaemic; RBZ n=207, sham n=108) and 291 patients in BRIGHTER (ischaemic; RBZ n=87, RBZ + laser n=71, laser n=41: non-ischaemic; RBZ n=35, RBZ+L n=37, laser n=20). In CRUISE, the mean baseline BCVA was substantially lower for ischaemic versus non-ischaemic patients in both RBZ (37.5 vs 49.8 letters) and sham (29.5 vs 49.4 letters) treatment arms respectively. Baseline central retinal thickness and disease duration prior to enrolment were similar for all groups. In BRIGHTER, the mean baseline BCVA was slightly lower for ischaemic versus non-ischaemic patients in the RBZ+L (58.7 vs 60.4 letters) and Laser (55.6 vs 60.6 letters) respectively, but equal for RBZ (60.6 for both groups). In CRUISE and BRIGHTER, patients treated with RBZ achieved significantly greater gains in BCVA compared to the control arms irrespective of ischaemic status. In CRUISE, CRVO patients treated with RBZ achieved substantial gains in BCVA from baseline at month 6 (16.7 vs 14.4 letters) and month 12 (20.1 vs 14.7 letters) for ischaemic vs non-ischaemic patients respectively. The same was true in BRVO patients in BRIGHTER
Taylor SRJ (2008) Malignancies of the Posterior Segment Optometry Today
Tomkins-Netzer O, Bar A, Taylor SRJ, Lightman S (2012) Visual outcome in birdshot chorioretinopathy
Talat L, Tomkins-Netzer O, Taylor SRJ, Din NM, Bar A, Isa H, Lightman S (2014) The influence of diabetes mellitus on the management and visual outcome of patients with uveitis ACTA OPHTHALMOLOGICA 92 (4) pp. e329-e330
Sallam A, Taylor SRJ, Khan A, Mccluskey P, Lynn WA, Manku K, Pacheco PA, Lightman S (2012) FACTORS DETERMINING VISUAL OUTCOME IN ENDOGENOUS CANDIDA ENDOPHTHALMITIS RETINA-THE JOURNAL OF RETINAL AND VITREOUS DISEASES 32 (6) pp. 1129-1134
Brand C, Musadiq M, Yang Y, Taylor SRJ, Gale R, Brittain C, Hamilton R (2013) Baseline characteristics of the UK wet age-related macular degeneration (wAMD) cohort of the LUMINOUS observational study
Khan O, Taylor SJ, Jones JG, Swart M, Hanes DP, Carpenter RHS (1999) Effects of low-dose isoflurane on saccadic eye movement generation ANAESTHESIA 54 (2) pp. 142-145
Taylor SRJ, Khan OA, Swart ML, Lockwood GG, Jones JG (1998) Effects of a low concentration of isoflurane on contrast sensitivity in volunteers BRITISH JOURNAL OF ANAESTHESIA 81 (2) pp. 176-179
Tomkins-Netzer O, Taylor SRJ, Lightman S (2013) Factors Affecting the Long-term Visual Prognosis in Birdshot Chorioretinopathy
Khan OA, Taylor SRJ, Jones JG (2000) Anaesthesia and saccadic eye movements ANAESTHESIA 55 (9) pp. 877-882
Sallam A, Taylor SRJ, Habot-Wilner Z, Elgohary M, Do HH, McCluskey P, Lightman S (2012) Repeat intravitreal triamcinolone acetonide injections in uveitic macular oedema ACTA OPHTHALMOLOGICA 90 (4) pp. E323-E325
Bar A, Tomkins-Netzer O, Taylor SRJ, Lightman S (2012) Visual loss in uveitis
Taylor SRJ, Aylward GW (2005) Endophthalmitis following 25-gauge vitrectomy EYE 19 (11) pp. 1228-1229
Zaheer I, Taylor SRJ, Pearson RV (2007) Phacoemulsification in vitrectomized eyes under topical anesthesia EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF OPHTHALMOLOGY 17 (3) pp. 336-340
Khot A, Dignan F, Taylor S, Potter M, Cubitt D, Treleaven JG (2006) Another case of PORN (bilateral progressive outer retinal necrosis) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION 37 (1) pp. 113-114
Tomkins-Netzer O, Taylor SRJ, Lightman S (2013) Long-term clinical outcomes among patients with birdshot chorioretinopathy
Shao EH, Dong YL, Dave R, Taylor SR, Sivagnanavel V (2014) Rebound increase in VEGF levels following intravitreal injection of bevacizumab in a child
Shirodkar A, Lightman S, Taylor SRJ (2010) Good Medical Practice - Causes of Visual Loss: Data from Population Studies Foundation Years Journal 6 (4) pp. 26-31
Joshi L, Karydis A, Gemenetzi M, Shao EH, Taylor SR (2013) Uveitis as a Result of MAP Kinase Pathway Inhibition. Case reports in ophthalmology 4 (3) pp. 279-282
We report the case of a patient treated with dabrafenib and trametinib (mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway inhibitors) for stage 3b cutaneous melanoma who developed bilateral uveitis. Although there have been reports of ocular side effects with this class of drugs, uveitis has not been previously reported to the best of our knowledge. This case indicates the wide range of side effects that can be seen with the newer targeted biological therapies.
Taylor SR (2013) COMRADE-B trial of Ranibizumab vs. Dexamethasone in Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion: Exploratory Analysis
Joshi L, Lightman SL, Salama AD, Shirodkar AL, Pusey CD, Taylor SRJ (2011) Rituximab in Refractory Ophthalmic Wegener's Granulomatosis PR3 Titers May Predict Relapse, But Repeat Treatment Can Be Effective OPHTHALMOLOGY 118 (12) pp. 2498-2503
Isa H, Pusey CD, Lightman S, Taylor SRJ (2011) Ocular manifestations of Wegener's granulomatosis Expert Review of Ophthalmology 5 (6) pp. 541-555
Menezo V, Taylor SR (2014) Birdshot uveitis: current and emerging treatment options. Clinical ophthalmology (Auckland, N.Z.) 8 pp. 73-81
Birdshot chorioretinopathy is a relatively uncommon subtype of idiopathic posterior uveitis with distinct clinical characteristics and a strong genetic association with the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-A29 allele. The diagnosis remains clinical and is based on the presence of typical clinical features, including multiple, distinctive, hypopigmented choroidal lesions throughout the fundus. The long-term visual prognosis of this disorder, however, remains guarded - central visual acuity can be preserved until late in the disease and it is not uncommon for patients to receive inadequate immunosuppressive treatment, leading to a poor long-term outcome in which peripheral retinal damage eventually leads to visual deterioration. Birdshot chorioretinopathy has proven a particularly attractive area of study within the field of uveitis, as it is a relatively easily defined disease with an associated human leukocyte antigen haplotype. Despite this, however, the immune mechanisms involved in its pathogenesis remain unclear, and some patients continue to lose retinal function despite therapy with corticosteroids and conventional immunosuppressive agents. Laboratory research continues to investigate the underlying mechanisms of disease, and clinical research is now being driven to improve the phenotyping and monitoring of this condition as, in the era of so-called personalized medicine, it is becoming increasingly important to identify patients at risk of visual loss early so that they can be treated more aggressively with targeted therapies such as the newer biological agents. This approach requires the formation of collaborative groups, as the relative rarity of the condition makes it difficult for one center to accumulate enough patients for worthwhile studies. Nevertheless, results obtained with newer therapies, such as biological agents directed against particular cytokines or cell-surface receptors, demonstrate ever improving control of the inflammation in refractory cases, providing hope that the outlook for visual function in this condition can only improve.
Taylor SRJ, Habot-Wilner Z, Pacheco P, Lightman SL (2009) Intraocular Methotrexate in the Treatment of Uveitis and Uveitic Cystoid Macular Edema OPHTHALMOLOGY 116 (4) pp. 797-801
Sallam A, Taylor SRJ, Lightman S (2011) Review and update of intraocular therapy in noninfectious uveitis CURRENT OPINION IN OPHTHALMOLOGY 22 (6) pp. 517-522
Shalchi Z, Lightman SL, Pusey CD, Taylor SRJ (2012) A sore red eye with systemic involvement BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL 344
Singh J, Sallam A, Lightman S, Taylor SRJ (2011) Episcleritis and scleritis in the rheumatic diseases Current Rheumatology Reviews 7 pp. 24-30
Yang DSF, Taylor SRJ, Lightman SL (2008) Interferon-alpha in the management of patients with Behcet's disease BRITISH JOURNAL OF HOSPITAL MEDICINE 69 (10) pp. 575-+
Taylor SRJ (2010) Multifocal Choroiditis
Multifocal choroiditis forms a subset of the white-dot syndromes in which inflammation is focussed on the choroid. Multifocal choroiditis with panuveitis (MCP), punctate inner choroidopathy (PIC) and birdshot chorioretinopathy (BCR) have been distinguished, although some consider PIC to be a variant of MCP. The aetiology is largely unknown and treatment is with local or systemic corticosteroids as well as immunosuppressive agents. Visual prognosis depends on the adverse effects of uveitis.
Shalchi Z, Taylor SRJ, Lightman S (2011) The eye in haematological disease BRITISH JOURNAL OF HOSPITAL MEDICINE 72 (12) pp. 691-697
Din NM, Tomkins-Netzer O, Talat L, Taylor SR, Isa H, Bar A, Lightman S (2016) Raised Intraocular Pressure in Nonjuvenile Idiopathic Arthritis-Uveitis Children: Risk Factors and Effect on Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer. Journal of glaucoma 25 (7) pp. 598-604
Purpose: To determine risk factors for intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation and glaucoma in children with nonjuvenile idiopathic arthritis?related uveitis and any IOP-related changes in the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness.

Patients and Methods: Clinical data were collected from children attending a tertiary referral uveitis clinic between May 2010 and October 2012. We assigned 206 eyes of 103 children into 32 normal eyes, 108 normotensive uveitics (NU), 41 hypertensive uveitics (HU: raised IOP without glaucomatous disc), and 25 glaucomatous uveitics (GU: raised IOP with glaucomatous disc). Risk factors for raised IOP, glaucoma and steroid response (SR) were evaluated and RNFL thickness across groups was compared with determine changes related to raised IOP.

Results: IOP elevation occurred in 40 patients (38.8%) or 66/174 eyes with uveitis (37.9%); and SR occurred in 35.1% of all corticosteroid-treated eyes. Chronic uveitis was a significant risk factor for raised IOP [odds ratio (OR)=9.28, P=0.001], glaucoma, and SR (OR=8.4, P15 mm Hg from baseline), associated with younger age and corticosteroid injections. Although no significant RNFL thinning was detected between HU and NU eyes, significant thinning was detected in the inferior quadrant of GU (121.3±28.9 ¼m) compared with NU eyes (142.1±32.0 ¼m, P=0.043).

Conclusions: Children with chronic uveitis are at higher risk of raised IOP and glaucoma. Thinning of the inferior RNFL quadrant may suggest glaucomatous changes in uveitic children with raised IOP.

Kabasele PMB, Taylor SR, Lightman SL (2010) INCIDENCE OF UVEITIS DUE TO BEHCET DISEASE AND COMPLICATIONS CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RHEUMATOLOGY 28 (4) pp. S146-S146
Tomkins-Netzer O, Taylor SRJ, Lightman S (2014) Long-term Clinical and Anatomic Outcome of Birdshot Chorioretinopathy JAMA OPHTHALMOLOGY 132 (1) pp. 57-62
Hamilton R, Taylor SRJ, Warburton J, Johnstone R, Patel P, Burton B, Brand C (2014) Clinical outcomes in the UK for 866 patients with wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) treated with ranibizumab for 1 year using an individualised patient treatment approach- LUMINOUS UK interim 1 year results
Purpose: The efficacy and safety profile of ranibizumab is well described based on randomized controlled trials involving >10,000 patients across five indications. However, real-world long term safety and effectiveness have not been widely documented in large populations across diverse regions. The LUMINOUS study (NCT01318941) is designed to assess the long-term safety, effectiveness, treatment-patterns and health-related quality of life associated with ranibizumab treatment in a real-world setting. Here, we present data from the wet age-related macular degeneration (wAMD) cohort from the planned first year interim analyses of the LUMINOUS study Setting: LUMINOUS is an ongoing observational, non-interventional, open-label, multicenter study currently conducted in over 30 countries. Patients treated with ranibizumab for any approved indication in the local product label are recruited Methods: The LUMINOUS study aims to enrol 30,000 patients from 600 sites in 41 countries. Consenting adult patients (treatment naïve or previously treated with ranibizumab or other ocular treatment) were enrolled. Exclusion criteria were simultaneous participation in another investigational study, or systemic/ocular vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitor administration other than ranibizumab in the 90 days prior to study enrolment. Of the 2163 patients recruited up to March 2012, 97.7% had wAMD, 1.7% had diabetic macular edema and 0.6% had retinal vein occlusion. Here, we present the one-year follow up data from the wAMD cohort. In this wAMD cohort (n=2112), 275 (13.0%) were treatment naive (T1), 1829 (86.6%) had previous ranibizumab treatment (T2) and eight (0.4%) had previously received other ocular treatments (T3). Pre-treatment status was defined by the primary-treated eye Results: At baseline, mean age was 79.2 years, 61.8% were female, and 93.7% were Caucasian. The baseline mean visual acuity (VA, ETDRS letter score) was 52.4 and 60.3 for T1 and T2, respectively. The median time from diagnosis to first treatment was 0.04 years (2 weeks) for T1 and the median time from diagnosis to study entry was 1.70 years for T2. Pre-treatment with ranibizumab (T2) was associated with higher VA (60.3/52.4 letters) and lower central retinal thickness (CRT; 255.0/339.7µm) at baseline than the treatment naïve group (T1). At 12 months, patients in T1 gained 4.1 letters, whilst T2 patients generally maintained their higher level of baseline VA (-1.1 letters). Both T1 and T2 grou
Manasseh G, Donovan D, Shao EH, Taylor SR (2014) Bilateral sequential non-arteritic anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy following repeat influenza vaccination. Case reports in ophthalmology 5 (2) pp. 267-269
A 68-year-old man developed bilateral sequential non-arteritic anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy, each episode occurring with a close temporal relationship to influenza vaccination.
Isa H, Tan LT, Lightman S, Taylor SRJ (2012) Histological features on orbital biopsy predictive of outcome in Wegener's granulomatosis
Singh J, Taylor SRJ, Stanford M, Lightman S (2011) Visual loss in Behcet's disease
Joshi L, Hamour S, Salama AD, Pusey CD, Lightman S, Taylor SR (2009) Renal & ocular targets for therapy in Wegener's granulomatosis. Inflammation & allergy drug targets 8 (1) pp. 70-79
Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) is a multisystem small-vessel vasculitis which is characterised by granulomatous inflammation. Respiratory tract involvement is most commonly seen, affecting up to 85% of patients, closely followed by the renal system in up to 75% of patients; ocular involvement in WG is estimated to occur in 50-60% of patients. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the renal and ocular manifestations of WG and discuss the rationale behind the therapeutic approach. In particular, we will focus on how understanding the disease processes in both of these organs has led to more targeted therapy. The mechanism of action of the various immunosuppressive medications in both systemic and ocular inflammation and the evidence available for their use will also be discussed.
Taylor S, Lightman S (2004) Recurrent anterior uveitis in patients with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome ARCHIVES OF OPHTHALMOLOGY 122 (6) pp. 922-923
Din NM, Taylor SRJ, Isa H, Tomkins-Netzer O, Bar A, Talat L, Lightman S (2014) Evaluation of Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Eyes With Hypertensive Uveitis JAMA OPHTHALMOLOGY 132 (7) pp. 859-865
Taylor SRJ, Sallam A, Khan A, McCluskey P, Lynn WA, Manku K, Pacheco PA, Lightman S (2013) Untitled Reply RETINA-THE JOURNAL OF RETINAL AND VITREOUS DISEASES 33 (2) pp. 454-456
Shao E, Atkins K, Tam FW, Taylor SRJ VEGF changes in diabetic macular oedema treated with intravitreal anti-VEGF injections
Taylor SRJ, Singh J, Menezo V, Wakefield D, McCluskey P, Lightman S (2011) Behcet Disease: Visual Prognosis and Factors Influencing the Development of Visual Loss AMERICAN JOURNAL OF OPHTHALMOLOGY 152 (6) pp. 1059-1066
Tempest-Roe S, Shao EH, McDaid J, Taylor SR (2014) P2X7 deficiency protects against experimental autoimmune uveitis
Sallam A, Taylor S (2009) Ocular emergencies 2: non-traumatic. Br J Hosp Med (Lond) 70 (4) pp. M54-M58
Joshi L, Tomkins-Netzer O, Menezo V, Sallam A, Kirkpatrick N, Lightman S, Taylor SRJ (2013) Dexamethasone implants and neovascular glaucoma in central retinal vein occlusion ACTA OPHTHALMOLOGICA 91 (3) pp. E239-E240
Taylor SRJ, Pacheco PA, Lightman S (2011) Dry eye in the rheumatic diseases Current Rheumatology Reviews 7 pp. 15-23
Tomkins-Netzer O, Taylor SR, Lightman S (2012) Corticosteroid-sparing agents: new treatment options. Developments in ophthalmology 51 pp. 47-56
Corticosteroids form the cornerstone of treatment for noninfectious uveitis, but their safety profile and adverse effects render their use a double-edged sword. As a result, the local benefits of treating ocular inflammation may be outweighed by systemic adverse effects, and it is mainly for this reason that steroid-sparing agents are used. Most of these systemic immunomodulatory drugs used in ophthalmology have been adopted from other specialties, such as rheumatology and, while their safety profiles make them valid alternatives to long-term high-dose corticosteroids, systemic side effects still prove problematic for a significant proportion of patients. The desire to avoid these systemic side effects has driven the continuing search for effective agents with an improved safety profile, but also the increasing use of local drug administration, which avoids systemic side-effects, but may lead to ocular complications. Here we review both approaches and discuss the possible risks and benefits of each.
Tempest-Roe S, Tam FW, Taylor SRJ The P2X7 receptor is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of Uveitis
Shao EH, Menezo V, Taylor SRJ (2014) Birdshot chorioretinopathy CURRENT OPINION IN OPHTHALMOLOGY 25 (6) pp. 488-494
Taylor SRJ, Isa H, Joshi L, Lightman S (2010) New Developments in Corticosteroid Therapy for Uveitis OPHTHALMOLOGICA 224 pp. 46-53
Karydis A, Shao EH, Gemenetzi M, Taylor SR (2014) Intravitreal bevacizumab results in greater functional improvements in visual acuity compared to intravitreal ozurdex at 3 months in retinal vein occlusions
Gangaputra SS, Altaweel MM, Peng Q, Friedman DS, Rao PK, Foster CS, Kim RY, Reed SB, Srivastava SK, Wong IG, Kempen JH (2011) Morphologic Assessment for Glaucoma in the Multicenter Uveitis Steroid Treatment (MUST) Trial Ocular Immunology and Inflammation 19 (4) pp. 267-274
Isa H, Luthert P, Rose G, Verity D, Pusey C, Tomkins-Netzer O, Din NM, Teak TL, Taylor S, Lightman S (2015) Tissue Interleukin-17 and Interleukin-23 as Biomarkers for Orbital Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis OPHTHALMOLOGY 122 (10) pp. 2140-2142
Joshi L, Yaganti S, Gemenetzi M, Lightman S, Lindfield D, Liolios V, Menezo V, Shao E, Taylor SRJ (2013) Dexamethasone implants in retinal vein occlusion: 12-month clinical effectiveness using repeat injections as-needed BRITISH JOURNAL OF OPHTHALMOLOGY 97 (8) pp. 1040-1044
Taylor SR, Lightman SL Intraocular methotrexate in uveitis
Joshi L, Talat L, Yaganti S, Sandhu S, Taylor SRJ, Wakefield D, McCluskey P, Lightman S (2014) Outcomes of Changing Immunosuppressive Therapy after Treatment Failure in Patients with Noninfectious Uveitis OPHTHALMOLOGY 121 (5) pp. 1119-1124
Taylor SRJ, Lightman SL, Sugar EA, Jaffe GJ, Freeman WR, Altaweel MM, Kozak I, Holbrook JT, Jabs DA, Kempen JH (2012) The Impact of Macular Edema on Visual Function in Intermediate, Posterior, and Panuveitis OCULAR IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION 20 (3) pp. 171-181
Taylor SRJ, Lim R (2015) Evaluation of a modified graft-free technique of Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) implantation
Title: Evaluation of a modified graft-free technique of Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) implantation Purpose: To determine the outcome of AGV implanted via a scleral tunnel, without using any patch grafts. Method: Retrospective case series of 18 consecutive patients undergoing AGV via scleral tunnels in a single hospital from 2011-2015. Results: The mean follow-up was 1.7 ± 1.4 years. The mean age of the patients at the time of surgery was 73.4 ± 9.2 years old. The cases include 72% neovascular glaucoma, 11% primary open angle glaucoma, 6% posner schlossman, 6% pseudoexfoliation and 6% uveitic glaucoma. Mean intraocular pressures (IOPs) before and after AGV implant were 40.8 ± 11.9mmHg and 15.9 ± 7.9mmHg respectively. Median visual acuity before and after AGV implant were both counting fingers. There was no tube erosion noted, although 2 patients (11%) had end-plate erosion, requiring explantation of the AGV. Other post-operative complications (occurring at any point) include hyphaemas >1mm (33%), choroidal effusions (22%), shallow AC requiring healon injection (6%), tenon?s cyst requiring excision (6%) and fibrosed bleb requiring needling (6%). All hyphaemas and choroidal effusions resolved without intervention. Success at final follow-up (IOP between 5 and 21mm Hg with least 20% reduction from baseline IOP, without additional glaucoma surgery nor loss of light perception) was 72%. Conclusion: In this graft-free technique of AGV implantation, there were no tube erosions but 2 patients (11%) had end-plate exposure. This end-plate exposure rate is comparable to the range reported in traditional AGV implant using patch-grafts.
Hooper CY, Taylor SRJ, Lightman S (2011) Uveitis in the rheumatic diseases Current Rheumatology Reviews 7 pp. 31-38
Tempest-Roe S, Joshi L, Dick AD, Taylor SR (2013) Local therapies for inflammatory eye disease in translation: past, present and future. BMC Ophthalmol 13 (1)
Despite their side-effects and the advent of systemic immunosuppressives and biologics, the use of corticosteroids remains in the management of patients with uveitis, particularly when inflammation is associated with systemic disease or when bilateral ocular disease is present. The use of topical corticosteroids as local therapy for anterior uveitis is well-established, but periocular injections of corticosteroid can also be used to control mild or moderate intraocular inflammation. More recently, intraocular corticosteroids such as triamcinolone and steroid-loaded vitreal inserts and implants have been found to be effective, including in refractory cases. Additional benefits are noted when ocular inflammation is unilateral or asymmetric, when local therapy may preclude the need to increase the systemic medication.Implants in particular have gained prominence with evidence of efficacy including both dexamethasone and fluocinolone loaded devices. However, an appealing avenue of research lies in the development of non-corticosteroid drugs in order to avoid the side-effects that limit the appeal of injected corticosteroids. Several existing drugs are being assessed, including anti-VEGF compounds such as ranibizumab and bevacizumab, anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha antibodies such as infliximab, as well as older cytotoxic medications such as methotrexate and cyclosporine, with varying degrees of success. Intravitreal sirolimus is currently undergoing phase 3 trials in uveitis and other inflammatory pathways have also been proposed as suitable therapeutic targets. Furthermore, the advent of biotechnology is seeing advances in generation of new therapeutic molecules such as high affinity binding peptides or modified high affinity or bivalent single chain Fab fragments, offering higher specificity and possibility of topical delivery.
Shirodkhar A-L, Lightman S, Taylor SRJ (2012) Management of branch retinal vein occlusion BRITISH JOURNAL OF HOSPITAL MEDICINE 73 (1) pp. 20-23
Joshi L, Taylor SRJ, Large O, Yacoub S, Lightman S (2009) A Case of Optic Neuropathy after Short-Term Linezolid Use in a Patient with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia CLINICAL INFECTIOUS DISEASES 48 (7) pp. e73-e74
Taylor SRJ, Lightman S (2003) The eye in cardiac and cardiovascular disease British Journal of Hospital Medicine 5 (64) pp. 299-302
Lightman S, Taylor SRJ, Bunce C, Longhurst H, Lynn W, Moots R, Stanford M, Tomkins-Netzer O, Yang D, Calder VL, Haskard DO (2015) Pegylated interferon-alpha-2b reduces corticosteroid requirement in patients with Behcet's disease with upregulation of circulating regulatory T cells and reduction of Th17 ANNALS OF THE RHEUMATIC DISEASES 74 (6) pp. 1138-1144
Tempest-Roe S Novel therapeutic mechanisms in uveitis
Taylor SRJ, Hamilton R, Hooper CY, Joshi L, Morarji J, Gupta N, Lightman SL (2012) Valacyclovir in the treatment of acute retinal necrosis BMC OPHTHALMOLOGY 12 (ARTN 48)
Background: To report the outcome of oral valacyclovir as the sole antiviral therapy for patients with acute retinal
necrosis (ARN).
Methods: This study reports a retrospective, interventional case series of nine consecutive patients with ten eyes with
newly diagnosed ARN treated with oral valacyclovir as the sole antiviral agent. Eight patients received oral valacyclovir 2 g
tid (Valtrex, GlaxoSmithKline) and one patient with impaired renal function received oral 1 g tid. The main outcome
measures were response to treatment, time to initial response to treatment, time to complete resolution of retinitis, best
corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at final follow-up, retinal detachment and development of recurrent or second eye disease.
Results: Retinitis resolved in ten of ten (100%) affected eyes. The median time to initial detectable response was seven
days and the median time to complete resolution was 21 days. A final BCVA of 20/40 or better was achieved in 6/10
(60%) of eyes. 3/10 eyes (30%) developed a retinal detachment. No patients developed either disease reactivation or
second eye involvement over the course of the study (mean follow up 31 weeks, range 7 to 104 weeks).
Conclusions: Treatment with oral valacyclovir as the sole antiviral therapy resulted in complete resolution of retinitis.
Final BCVA and retinal detachment rate were comparable with previously reported outcomes for intravenous acyclovir
Morarji J, Joshi L, Tomkins-Netzer O, Lightman S, Taylor SR (2012) Combined infliximab and rituximab in necrotising scleritis. Case reports in ophthalmology 3 (3) pp. 286-290
We report a patient with necrotising scleritis in whom infliximab was used for short-term steroid-sparing while rituximab took effect. This enabled disease control without requiring an extended period of high-dose corticosteroid administration or the concurrent use of cyclophosphamide.
Isa H, Lightman S, Luthert PJ, Rose GE, Verity DH, Taylor SRJ (2012) Histopathological features predictive of a clinical diagnosis of ophthalmic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL PATHOLOGY 5 (7) pp. 684-689
Joshi L, Shirodkhar A, Taylor SRJ, Lightman S (2011) The ocular features of TB infection
Taylor SR, Zaheer I, Patel PJ, Karia N (2005) Spontaneous Resolution of Vitreomacular Traction in Young Patients Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 46
Taylor SRJ, Turner CM, Elliott JI, McDaid J, Hewitt R, Smith J, Pickering MC, Whitehouse DL, Cook HT, Burnstock G, Pusey CD, Unwin RJ, Tam FWK (2009) P2X(7) Deficiency Attenuates Renal Injury in Experimental Glomerulonephritis JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF NEPHROLOGY 20 (6) pp. 1275-1281
Shao EH, Sivagnanavel V, Dabbagh A, Dave R, Tempest-Roe S, Tam FWK, Taylor SR (2015) Multiphasic changes in systemic VEGF following intravitreal injections of ranibizumab in a child EYE 29 (4) pp. 569-573
Joshi L, Singh J, Tan LT, Taylor SRJ, Lightman S (2011) Developing an electronic virtual patient in ophthalmology for medical undergraduates
Joshi L, Morarji J, Tomkins-Netzer O, Lightman S, Taylor SR (2012) Rhizobium radiobacter Endophthalmitis following Intravitreal Ranibizumab Injection. Case reports in ophthalmology 3 (3) pp. 283-285
We present the first reported case of acute endophthalmitis due to Rhizobium radiobacter after an intravitreal injection of ranibizumab for neovascular age-related macular degeneration.
Joshi L, Taylor SR, Lightman S (2009) Uveitis in Ankylosing Spondylitis
Patient Information Leaflet
Morarji J, Lightman S, Taylor SRJ (2011) The eye in rheumatology BRITISH JOURNAL OF HOSPITAL MEDICINE 72 (12) pp. 682-685
Taylor SRJ, Joshi L, Lightman S (2011) Rituximab in ocular disease
Joshi L, Taylor SRJ, Large O, Lightman S (2009) Optic Neuropathy following Linezolid Use in a Patient with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Reply CLINICAL INFECTIOUS DISEASES 49 (4) pp. 646-646
Taylor SRJ, Lightman S, Sugar EA, Jaffe GJ, Altaweel MA, Kozak I, Holbrook JT, Jabs DA, Kempen JH (2012) The impact of macular edema on visual function in uveitis
Joshi L, Lightman S, Taylor SRJ (2012) PR3 titres predict relapse following rituximab therapy in Wegener's granulomatosis
Robins J, Lightman S, Taylor SRJ (2011) The eye in virology BRITISH JOURNAL OF HOSPITAL MEDICINE 72 (12) pp. 672-676
Taylor SRJ, Alexander DR, Cooper JC, Higgins CF, Elliott JI (2007) Regulatory T cells are resistant to apoptosis via TCR but not P2X(7) JOURNAL OF IMMUNOLOGY 178 (6) pp. 3474-3482
Hattenbach LO, Hoerauf H, Feltgen N, Lang G, Taylor S, Schmitz-Valckenberg S, Wolf A, Knorr T (2014) Efficacy and Safety of 0.5 mg Ranibizumab Administered as Intravitreal Injections PRN Compared with Intravitreal Implant Containing 0.7 mg Dexamethasone in Patients with Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion Over 6 Months: The COMRADE-B Study OPHTHALMOLOGICA 232 pp. 90-90
Taylor SRJ, Menezo V, Lympany PA, Watson D, du Bois RM, Lightman S (2004) Interferon-Gamma polymorphisms as genetic predictors of uveitis in sarcoidosis INVESTIGATIVE OPHTHALMOLOGY & VISUAL SCIENCE 45 pp. U199-U199
Taylor SRJ (2016) Biologic Therapy in Uveitis European Ophthalmic Review 10 (1) pp. 17-18
The treatment of uveitis is undergoing significant change as a result of the development of new therapeutic approaches, of which the biologic agents form a major part. These targeted therapies have shown great promise for the treatment of refractory disease and some have now undergone systematic evaluation through prospective clinical trials, unlike many of their predecessor drugs.
Chalkiadakis S, Parikakis E, Taylor SRJ (2016) Sutureless 25-Gauge Pars Plana Vitrectomy Combined with Retropupillary Fixation of an Iris-Claw Intraocular Lens Case Reports in Ophthalmology 7 pp. 155-161
Background: The surgical case of a dropped intraocular lens inside the vitreous cavity constitutes a real challenge for the operating surgeon. Herein, we describe a case series where an alternative optical rehabilitation technique for late intraocular lens-bag complex dislocation has been used. Methods: A modern vitrectomy device was used to remove the capsule with the dropped intraocular lens using sutureless 25-gauge pars plana vitrectomy. To ensure a better aesthetic result, with faster patient recovery and a reduced number of operations, the whole procedure was performed during the same operating session; an iris-claw intraocular lens for aphakia was selected for implantation. The implant was passed behind the constricted iris with the concave surface facing it. The lens was grasped with the manufacturer?s holding forceps and fixed onto the posterior surface of the iris using the special enclavation needles. Results: We have operated 12 eyes in two different clinical centres successfully, with minimal intra- and/or postoperative complications. Conclusion: We believe that this is a viable solution for the visual rehabilitation of patients, who would otherwise need more than one operation for a lens exchange
Hattenbach L, Feltgen N, Bertelmann T, Schmitz-Valckenberg S, Berk H, Eter N, Lang G, Rehak M, Taylor S, Wolf A, Weiss C, Paulus E, Pielen A, Hoerauf H (2017) Head-to-head comparison of ranibizumab PRN versus single-dose dexamethasone for branch retinal vein occlusion (COMRADE-B) Acta Ophthalmologica 96 (1) pp. e10-e18
Purpose: To compare the efficacy and safety of ranibizumab 0.5 mg versus dexamethasone 0.7 mg according to their European labels in macular oedema secondary to branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) in a 6-month, phase IIIb, randomized trial. Methods: Patients received eithermonthly ranibizumabfor 3 months followed byPro re nata (PRN) treatment (n = 126) or a sustained-release dexamethasone implant followedbyPRNshaminjections (n = 118).Mainoutcomesweremeanaveragechange in best-corrected visual acuity(BCVA)frombaseline tomonth1throughmonth6,mean changes inBCVAand foveal centre point thickness (FCPT), and adverse events (AEs). Results: There was no difference in BCVA gains between the treatments prior to month 3. Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) gain with dexamethasone declined thereafter. From month 3 to month 6, mean BCVA change from baseline was significantly higher with ranibizumab than with dexamethasone [raw means (standard deviation):+16.2 ( 11) letters versus+9.3 ( 10.1) letters].Atmonth 6, the difference in BCVA gains from baseline was +17.3 letters in the ranibizumab versus +9.2 letters in the dexamethasone group. Patients in the ranibizumab group received a mean of 2.94 loading injections and 1.74 PRN retreatment injections, while those in the dexamethasone group received a single loading injection. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and AEs were more frequent with dexamethasone than ranibizumab treatment. Conclusion: Ranibizumab PRN resulted in greater visual acuity (VA) gains in macular oedema following BRVO compared with single-dose dexamethasone over a 6-month study period, observed from month 3, when administered according to their European label. In clinical practice, retreatment with dexamethasone may be required prior to this point.
Srivastava S, Banker A, Sharma S, Taylor S (2017) Chronic NonInfectious Uveitis of the Posterior Segment: Current and Future Approaches to Individualize Management
Uveitis involving the posterior segment is a sight-threatening condition that can
be associated with multiple underlying ocular and systemic diseases. Accurate
diagnosis is the foundation for selecting treatment that can preserve vision and
is guided by the findings of a thorough history, clinical examination, laboratory
testing, and imaging. Evaluation and management of posterior uveitis varies
globally, however, because of geographic/ethnic variation in its causes, differences
in local practices, and varying access to diagnostic modalities and treatments.

This case-based program captures the highlights of a roundtable discussion,
in which an international panel of uveitis subspecialists provides their expert
perspectives on the diagnosis and management of uveitis involving the posterior
segment, including the role of emerging diagnostic techniques and new and
emerging therapies. The cases are from the files of Sunil K. Srivastava, MD.

Ansari S, de Lusignan S, Hinton W, Munro N, Taylor S, Mcgovern A (2018) Understanding the relationship between diabetes, retinopathy, glycaemic control, acute uveitis, and scleritis or episcleritis: A cohort database study Journal of Diabetes and Its Complications